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Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives

Authors:
  • Digital Equity Research Center

Abstract

Presentation to the Developing Broadband Leadership Webinar Series hosted by University of Illinois Extension Local Government Education Program, Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity Illinois Office of Broadband, and Benton Institute for Broadband & Society on June 3, 2020.
Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
Developing Broadband Leadership Webinar
June 3, 2020
Digital Inclusion and
Meaningful Broadband
Adoption Initiatives
LIS 421 Social Informatics, Fall 2019 | Module 6: Digital Equity
Research Problem & Context (2015)
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
Only 67% of Americans had
broadband at home (down from 70%
in 2013).
Low-income people face significant
barriers to broadband adoption.
Only 41% of people with an annual
household income of less than $20K
have broadband at home (down
from 46% in 2013).
-Pew Research Center (2015)
https://www.flickr.com/
photos/sitcdetroit/9411
924894
-https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/lifeline-support-affordable-communications
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
What are the key characteristics of
low-cost Internet and digital literacy
training programs for vulnerable
populations?
What indicators do broadband adoption
programs use to measure the success of
their programs?
Research Questions
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
https://bit.ly/benton
report
Community-Based Organizations
LIS 410 – Fall 2019 | Module 2: Power, Privilege, and Oppression
Austin, TX | Cleveland, OH | Kansas City, KS/MO | Los
Angeles, CA | Machias, ME | Portland, OR |
St. Paul, MN
Four-Part Digital Inclusion Strategy
1. Providing low-cost broadband
2. Connecting digital literacy training
with relevant content and services
3. Making low-cost computers
available
4. Operating public access computing
centers
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
https://bit.ly/benton
report
Four-Part Digital Inclusion Strategy
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
Four-Part Digital Inclusion Strategy
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
https://bit.ly/benton
report
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
https://bit.ly/benton
report
https://www.bento
n.org/sites/default/
files/broadbandincl
usion.pdf
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
Four-Part Digital Inclusion Strategy
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
https://bit.ly/benton
report
Ashbury Senior Computer Community Center
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
Four-Part Digital Inclusion Strategy
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
https://bit.ly/benton
report
LIS 421 Social Informatics, Fall 2019 | Module 6: Digital Equity
LIS 421 Social Informatics, Fall 2019 | Module 6: Digital Equity
Four-Part Digital Inclusion Strategy
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
https://bit.ly/benton
report
LIS 421 Social Informatics, Fall 2019 | Module 6: Digital Equity
Meaningful Broadband Adoption
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
“When we talk about meaningful
broadband adoption, we imply an
ecology of supportinstitutions,
organizations, and even informal
groups that serve to welcome new
users into broadband worlds; share
social norms, practices, and
processes related to using these
technologies.
-Gangadharan & Byrum (2012)
https://bit.ly/benton
report
Meaningful Broadband Adoption
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
https://bit.ly/benton
report
Implications for COVID-19 and Beyond
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
Rather than focusing on the human-to-
computer interactions, meaningful
broadband adoption emphasizes the
human-to-human interactions in
community contexts that are most
helpful to individuals and families.
https://bit.ly/benton
report
To Promo te Digi tal Equi ty, We Mu st . . .
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
https://www.flickr.com/
photos/sitcdetroit/9411
924894
To Promo te Digi tal Equi ty, We Mu st . . .
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
Acknowledge that digital inequality is
a social, not a technological problem.
https://www.flickr.com/
photos/sitcdetroit/9411
924894
To Promo te Digi tal Equi ty, We Mu st . . .
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
Acknowledge that digital inequality is a
social, not a technological problem.
Understand how a culture of poverty
impacts people’s ability to access and
use technology.
https://www.flickr.com/
photos/sitcdetroit/9411
924894
To Promo te Digi tal Equi ty, We Mu st . . .
Digital Inclusion and Meaningful Broadband Adoption Initiatives | Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
Acknowledge that digital inequality is a
social, not a technological problem.
Understand how a culture of poverty
impacts peoples ability to access and
use technology.
Listen to those most impacted by the
digital divide those closest to the
problem most often have answers to
the problem.
https://www.flickr.com/
photos/sitcdetroit/9411
924894
Colin Rhinesmith, Ph.D.
http://crhinesmith.com
@crhinesmith on Twitter
Thank you!
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