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Abstract

The Ministry of Ayurveda, Yoga & Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy (AYUSH)-molded in 2014-is designed with developing pedagogy, research, and promulgation of native alternative medicine systems in India. 1 The reformation has ushered some optimistic results in terms of growth of AYUSH hospitals, awareness among masses, and overall push in the direction of a scientific approach in the application of the system. However, it has also revealed the challenges around the principles and global practice of Ayurveda. One of the prime exports/attractions of the system lies in the coveted practice of Panchakarma. This article deals with the challenges and intricacies in the globalization of Panchakarma. Panchakarma Ayurvedic Epistemology: 2 The tenets of Panchakarma rely on a ground-up knowledge that outpours from Ayurveda. Ayurveda epistemology is distant from the rubrics that guide modern philosophy and society. With proper manpower training and a better approach through translated texts, the knowledge of Ayurveda can be propagated on a global scale. This has currently been the approach of the AYUSH ministry and many Ayurveda experts as well. We should also not discount the possibility and challenges of Panchakarma education in the modern setting. The integration in terms of pragmatics and education may be one of the most important reforms towards globalizing Panchakarma. This allows for a scientific as well as pragmatic outcome even in epistemologically Ayurvedic topics adding to the magnitude of globalization. The value of research: Ayurveda interestingly remains-despite its many successes-an uncharted subject. Interestingly, the research presents itself as one of the emerging buzzwords in the field. This positive attitude of core Ayurveda experts allows for a better standing of Ayurveda in terms of global prospects. Though Ayurveda research presents some challenges-like improper funding, lack of clinical trials, lack of expertise-this seems to be rapidly changing and bodes well for the prospects of globalizing Panchakarma. The impact was borne by minimal research activity especially outpours into the field of governance.
EDITORIAL IJATM.2019;1(1):1-2.
International Journal of Ayurveda and Traditional Medicine
Challenges in Globalizing Panchakarma.
Gopesh Mangal1
1Executive Editor, International Journal of Ayurveda and Traditional Medicine, Jaipur, India.
The Ministry of Ayurveda, Yoga & Naturopathy,
Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy (AYUSH)
molded in 2014 is designed with developing
pedagogy, research, and promulgation of native
alternative medicine systems in India.1The
reformation has ushered some optimistic results in
terms of growth of AYUSH hospitals, awareness
among masses, and overall push in the direction of a
scientific approach in the application of the system.
However, it has also revealed the challenges around
the principles and global practice of Ayurveda. One
of the prime exports/attractions of the system lies in
the coveted practice of Panchakarma
. This article
deals with the challenges and intricacies in the
globalization of Panchakarma
.
Panchakarma Ayurvedic Epistemology:2The tenets
of Panchakarma rely on a ground-up knowledge that
outpours from Ayurveda. Ayurveda epistemology is
distant from the rubrics that guide modern
philosophy and society. With proper manpower
training and a better approach through translated
texts, the knowledge of Ayurveda can be propagated
on a global scale. This has currently been the
approach of the AYUSH ministry and many
Ayurveda experts as well.
We should also not discount the possibility and
challenges of Panchakarma education in the modern
setting. The integration in terms of pragmatics and
education may be one of the most important reforms
towards globalizing Panchakarma
. This allows for a
scientific as well as pragmatic outcome even in
epistemologically Ayurvedic topics adding to the
magnitude of globalization.
The value of research: Ayurveda interestingly
remains – despite its many successes – an uncharted
subject. Interestingly, the research presents itself as
one of the emerging buzzwords in the field. This
positive attitude of core Ayurveda experts allows for
a better standing of Ayurveda in terms of global
prospects. Though Ayurveda research presents some
challenges like improper funding, lack of clinical
trials, lack of expertise this seems to be rapidly
changing and bodes well for the prospects of
globalizing Panchakarma
.
The impact was borne by minimal research activity
especially outpours into the field of governance.
Correspondence:Dr. Gopesh Mangal. Department
of Panchakarma, National Institute of Ayurveda,
Jaipur, India. Phone:+91-8619849011, Email:
gmangal108@gmail.com.
IJATM I VOL 1 I ISSUE 1 I DEC 2019
Free Full Text Articles are Available at https://ijatm.org/ 1
Gopesh Mangal.Challenges in Globalizing Panchakarma
.
Some countries only allow for external application
of various Panchakarma techniques but the intake of
Ayurvedic medicines is restricted. Research can act
as a guiding light towards policies that are more
lenient towards a holistic practice of Ayurveda.
Lack of technical personnel: Ayurveda highlights the
need for experienced technical personnel for the
proper treatment of the patient. These requirements
are dubbed as “Chikitsa Chatuspada
3 the four
pillars of treatment. Invariably proper practice of
Panchakarma mandates a qualified Bhishaka
(Physician), patient Paricharaka (~physician help),
unadulterated Ausadha
(~medicines), and Rogi
(~the
patient). The ever-growing popularity of
Panchakarma demands an ever-growing crop of
physicians and physician help which the present
educational scenario doesn’t account for the
scarcity of these might serve as a hindrance to
globalizing Panchakarma
.
The practice of Panchakarma is highly technical and
demands an individualistic approach from the
physician and whosoever comes in contact with the
patient before, during, and after the session of
Panchakarma (be it masseur, pharmacist, nurses,
etc.). It is commendable that several institutes are
conducting training to fulfill this ever-growing
demand of Paricharaka – the scope of which needs
to be expanded for a rapidly globalizing field. The
latitude of M.D. Panchakarma also needs an
augmentation through government funding or
private partnership.
Technical difficulties: These difficulties carry
various shapes and forms. From cutting a
Panchakarma table of right proportions (specific to
countries) to disposal of patient fomites (oil, towels,
sheets specific to a patient), to introducing and
convincing a patient to a treatment like Shirodhara,
Nasya
,Basti
, etc., to assess a patient based on their
all-encompassing environment and culture (Desh
,
Kala
,Bala
) requires a technically sound mind, a
fearless heart, a tolerant ear, and a keen eye. These
need to be accounted and introduced through a
merge between pragmatic Ayurveda practices and
education.
REFERENCES
1. Mallick S. Challenges of mainstreaming: Ayurvedic
practice in Delhi Government health institutions.
Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine.
2016;7(1):57–61.
2. Krishna S, Dinesh KS, Nazeema PK. Globalizing
ayurveda - opportunities and challenges. Int J Health
Sci Res. 2020; 10(3):55-68.
3. Bagde A.B. et.al. Chikitsa Chatushpad - Four Pillars
of Treatment In Ayurveda, Int. J. Ayu. Alt. Med.,
2014; 2(2):7-12
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