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First records of Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann, 1910 (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Coreidae) in Brazil and South Africa

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The first reports of Leptoglossus occidentalis in Brazil and South Africa are presented. The significance of these new records is discussed.
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Bol. Mus. Nac. Hist. Nat. Parag. Vol. 24, nº 1 (Jul. 2020): 10 0-100
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Recibido: Aceptado: Publicado online: 29.v.2020 1.vi.2020 2.vi.2020
2830
First records of Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann, 1910 (Hemiptera: Heteroptera:
Coreidae) in Brazil and South Africa
Primeros registros de Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann, 1910 (Hemiptera:
Heteroptera: Coreidae) en Brasil y Sudáfrica
Torsten van der Heyden1 & Eduardo I. Faúndez2
1Immenweide 83, D-22523 Hamburg, Germany. E-mail: tmvdh@web.de
2Laboratorio de entomología y salud pública, Instituto de la Patagonia, Universidad de Magallanes, Av. Bulnes 01855, Casilla 113-
D, Punta Arenas, Chile. E-mail: ed.faundez@gmail.com
Abstract.- The rst reports of Leptoglossus occidentalis in Brazil and South Africa are presented. The
signicance of these new records is discussed.
Key words: Invasive, Western Conifer Seed Bug, faunistics, new records, citizen science.
Resumen.- Se presentan los primeros reportes de Leptoglossus occidentalis en Brasil y Sudáfrica. Se
discute la signicancia de estos nuevos hallazgos.
Palabras clave: Invasiva, Chinche de las Coníferas Occidental, faunística, nuevos registros, ciencia
ciudadana.
The Western Conifer Seed Bug Leptoglos-
sus occidentalis Heidemann, 1910 is a North
American species of Coreidae widely distributed
in Canada, the United States of America and
Mexico, and one of the few that have become
invasive invading great parts of Europe and
Asia (Brailovsky, 2014; van der Heyden, 2019a,
2020; van der Heyden & Zettel, 2019). This
species feeds on conifers where it causes some
economic damage. Furthermore, it is considered
a nuisance for its aggregations in homes, even
damaging materials and biting people (Faúndez
et al., 2020).
Recently, L. occidentalis was reported from
Chile where it rapidly spreads (Faúndez et al.,
2017; Faúndez & Rocca, 2017; Faúndez et al.,
2019); then it was detected in Argentina (Car-
pintero et al., 2019; Kun & Masciocchi, 2019)
and Uruguay (Faúndez & Silvera, 2019). Thus,
the presence of the species in Brazil has been
expected.
Through citizen science records on the plat-
form iNaturalist plus records the authors were
requested to identify, we found the rst records
of this species in Brazil and South Africa, which
are detailed below.
Brazilian records
On 18.iv.2020, an adult specimen of L. occiden-
talis was photographed by Wellington Souza
(Souza, 2020) in Candiota, located in the state
of Rio Grande do Sul in the southernmost part
of Brazil, near the boundary with Uruguay. On
25.iv.2020 and on 29.v.2020, adult specimens
of L. occidentalis were found by Edson Gas-
perin (Gasperin, 2020) in Esmeralda, located
in Rio Grande do Sul as well. Furthermore,
on 26.iv.2020 a dead and apparently damaged
specimen of L. occidentalis was photographed
by Ricardo Ribeiro Cruz (Ribeiro Cruz, 2020)
in Eldorado do Sul, located in Rio Grande do
Sul, too. In addition, the second author of this
note received a request to identify an adult fe-
male which resulted to be L. occidentalis from
Mogi das Cruzes, São Paulo (south of Brazil)
on 07.vi.2017 (Fig. 1a).
South African records
On, 26.iv.2020, an adult specimen of L. occi-
dentalis was found in Silverglade, Cape Town,
South Africa. A photograph of the specimen was
published in the online database iNaturalist by a
Boletín del Museo nacional de Historia natural del Paraguay Vol. 24, Nº 1 (Julio 2020) 29
First records of Leptoglossus occidentalis in Brazil and South Africa
user with the pseudonym gabsdogmaster (Gabs-
dogmaster, 2020). The photograph is somewhat
blurred, but the specimen is undoubtly identi-
able. One day later, on 27.iv.2020, another adult
specimen of L. occidentalis was photographed
by Carol Mackay (Mackay, 2020; Fig. 1b) in
Somerset West, located in the City of Cape Town
Metropolitan Municipality. Mackay (pers. com.)
indicated that the specimen appeared inside her
home, and that there are a few pine trees around.
Near the house there is a golf course where there
are pine trees, too.
Remarks
As L. occidentalis has neither been reported for
Brazil nor for South Africa in scientic publica-
tions yet, the records reported in this note are
the rst ones for both countries.
In Brazil, the record from 2017 may have
been related to the rst populations arriving
in the country. Almost on the same date the
species was seen in Uruguay for the rst time.
Now, as the sigthings are increasing, it may be
possible that the species is establishing itself
in the country. It is worth to mention that in
Brazil L. occidentalis may result a threat to the
native Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol.) Kuntze
(Araucariaceae).
On the other hand, the records from South
Africa are the rst ones from the sub-Saharan
part of the continent. Previously, L. occidentalis
was only reported from the northernmost part of
Africa, specically from locations in the Medi-
terranean Region (van der Heyden, 2019b). As
one of the specimens was found inside a home,
in an area with several pine trees, it is possible
that a population has been established nearby
and specimens are looking for places for over-
wintering in homes, as it is a common habit of L.
occidentalis worldwide (Faúndez et al., 2020).
Acknowledgments
We thank Vera Lucia de Oliveira for the photo
of gure 1a and Carol Mackay for the photo of
gure 1b and additional information about her
nding.
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Figure 1. Two of the specimens of L. occidentalis recorded
in this paper. a) Specimen from Mogi das Cruzes, Brazil
(photo Vera Lucia de Oliveira). b) Specimen from Somerset
West, South Africa (photo Carol Mackay).
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... En América del Sur se reportó por primera vez en Chile durante 2017 en las ciudades de La Serena y Valparaíso (Faúndez et al., 2018b). Después de su detección experimentó una rápida expansión entre las regiones de Atacama y Bío Bío, y se considera bien establecida desde 2018 Faúndez et al., y Brasil (Faúndez & Silvera, 2019;van der Heyden & Faúndez, 2020). En la Patagonia argentina se detectó por primera vez en la zona de El Bolsón, provincia de Río Negro, en 2017, luego en las localidades de Bariloche y Dina Huapi , y tiempo después en la provincia de Neuquén Carpintero et al., 2019). ...
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Reporte para la provincia de Buenos Aires de tres especies de Heteroptera (Hemiptera) introducidas en Argentina
  • D L Carpintero
  • J L Farina
  • S De Biase
Carpintero, D.L., Farina, J.L. & De Biase, S. (2019). Reporte para la provincia de Buenos Aires de tres especies de Heteroptera (Hemiptera) introducidas en Argentina. Historia Natural, Tercera Serie, 9(1): 63-70.
Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis)
  • C Mackay
Mackay, C. (2020). Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis). [Consulted: 28.v.2020]. <https://www.inaturalist.org/ observations/43971152>.
Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis)
  • W Souza
Souza, W. (2020). Western Conifer Seed Bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis). [Consulted: 30.v.2020]. <https:/www.inaturalist.org/ observations/47848790>. van der Heyden, T. (2019a). Summarized data on the European distribution of Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann (Heteroptera: Coreidae: Coreinae: Anisoscelini). Revista Chilena de Entomología, 45(3): 499-502.