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Abstract

Introduction. Following on from work on the European bryophyte Red List, the taxonomically and nomenclaturally updated spreadsheets used for that project have been expanded into a new checklist for the bryophytes of Europe. Methods. A steering group of ten European bryologists was convened, and over the course of a year, the spreadsheets were compared with previous European checklists, and all changes noted. Recent literature was searched extensively. A taxonomic system was agreed, and the advice and expertise of many European bryologists sought. Key results. A new European checklist of bryophytes, comprising hornworts, liverworts and mosses, is presented. Fifteen new combinations are proposed. Conclusions. This checklist provides a snapshot of the current European bryophyte flora in 2019. It will already be out-of-date on publication, and further research, particularly molecular work, can be expected to result in many more changes over the next few years.
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... Gróa Valgerdur Ingimundardóttir (GVI) assisted in the determinations on both occasions. Nomenclature follows the latest checklist for European mosses (Hodgetts et al. 2020), except for Ceratodon heterophyllus where we follow Frey et al. (2006); for details on the nomenclature followed, see the annotated checklist in Appendix A, where we listed all bryophyte species that have been found on Surtsey up until April 2022. Information from specimens in the herbaria (ICEL and AMNH) of the Icelandic Institute of Natural History was also compiled here (Appendix A & B). ...
... The species was registered in 2008 with some doubt. Ceratodon heterophyllus is not included in the European checklist for bryophytes (Hodgetts et al. 2020), but is mentioned in The Liverworts, Mosses and Ferns of Europe as having been described from Spitsbergen (Frey et al. 2006). Morphological variation in the common C. purpureus is large (e.g. ...
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