Conference PaperPDF Available
A preview of the PDF is not available
... Walking is well known to increase worker health and wellbeing [16,38,62], and enables users to simultaneously conduct a productive task. However, walking meetings also pose a number of challenges [25,33], particularly difficulties in taking notes. Consequently, there is a need to investigate interactive technologies to support note-taking during walking meetings. ...
... At the moment, walking meetings are only seen as appropriate for early brainstorming or informal meetings where note-taking requirements are minimal [25,33]. Our work is motivated by a desire to make a wider range of meetings feasible to be conducted as walking meetings through technology support. ...
... From these prior works, we can see that there is a need for technology to be developed that provides increased support for walking meetings. While the existing positive aspects of walking and talking outside are known to users, the lack of ability to take notes during walking meetings is highlighted consistently in prior work [2,25,33]. Thus, the inability to effectively take notes emerges as a key hindrance to participating in walking meetings that go beyond brainstorming meetings or open discussions. How best to support users in this task remains an open research question, which we aim to investigate in this work. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
While walking meetings offer a healthy alternative to sit-down meetings, they also pose practical challenges. Taking notes is difficult while walking, which limits the potential of walking meetings. To address this, we designed the Walking Talking Stick -- a tangible device with integrated voice recording, transcription, and a physical highlighting button to facilitate note-taking during walking meetings. We investigated our system in a three-condition between-subjects user study with thirty pairs of participants ($N$=60) who conducted 15-minute outdoor walking meetings. Participants either used clip-on microphones, the prototype without the button, or the prototype with the highlighting button. We found that the tangible device increased task focus, and the physical highlighting button facilitated turn-taking and resulted in more useful notes. Our work demonstrates how interactive artifacts can incentivize users to hold meetings in motion and enhance conversation dynamics. We contribute insights for future systems which support conducting work tasks in mobile environments.
... Several works have been conducted in the fields of technology and computerhuman interactions (Damen et al. 2021, Ahtinen et al. 2017, Hirano et al., 2013, thus exploring how technology and design can encourage physical activity in the workplace. However, according to the scoping review by Damen et al. (2020), these fields have generally approached physical activity as a break from work, rather than exploring how this can be incorporated into the working practice. Two workplace walking meeting interventions conducted with office workers before COVID-19 (Danquah and Tolstrup, 2020;Kling et al. 2021) reported moderate success of walking meetings in increasing physical activity. ...
... It was reported that being outdoors and on-themove made it easier to 'connect on a more personal level', as being away from the office gave more chances to share personal experiences. This was also partially due to the fact that walking gave a more 'relaxed' and 'informal' atmosphere to the walking meeting, and meetings ended up being less structured -thus reflecting findings by Damen et al. (2020). Because of this, interviewees agreed that walking meetings can be particularly effective for brainstorming, to discuss initial research or business ideas; to discuss dissertation ideas with students; and to catch up and 'foster a relationship' with a colleague or partner or to make a new connection (cf. ...
... In this regard, some participants reported that for them it is important to plan ahead in terms of route length and facilities, with 30 minutes to 1 hour being identified as the ideal duration for a walking meeting. In this sense, pre-set walking routes aided by meeting point signs and booking system could overcome perceived barriers of planning and facilitate use (see Damen et al. 2020Damen et al. , 2021. ...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has revolutionised the way we experience the city, and working from home has become the norm for millions of workers. In parallel, the pandemic has created momentum for active travel modes in cities, including for walking. This essay illustrates the concept of the walking meeting as a potential trend for post-COVID-19 cities, and presents a pilot qualitative study with university workers exploring ideas, experiences, and perceptions related to walking meetings. Results suggest that walking meetings can contribute to physical and psychological health and promote creative thinking and socialisation, thus fighting potential isolation and low motivation of remote working. Quiet, nature, and traffic-free spaces were identified as ideal settings for walking meetings. The practice can contribute to healthy and sustainable post-COVID-19 cities.
... However, for many individuals, walking meetings are only seen as a viable replacement for specific categories of meetings. Early brainstorming and ideation sessions or informal meetings where minimal note-taking is required are commonly viewed as meetings that are appropriate for walking meetings [27]. While the benefits of walking meetings are apparent and technologies exist that could be used for meetings in motion (e.g. ...
... They also investigated additional infrastructure support in the form of "Hubs" to facilitate periodic note-taking and presentation of visuals during walking meetings [26]. Further, Damen and colleagues abstracted drivers and barriers for walking meetings from experiences conducting meetings on their marked walking path [27]. The drivers and barriers paper uncovered valuable qualitative insights on walking meetings related to their "WorkWalk" infrastructure. ...
... There is an unexplored opportunity to harness technology to support users in overcoming some limitations inherent to meetings in motion. For example, the lack of ability to take notes and use visuals is mentioned by users in multiple studies as a drawback of the walking meeting format [1,26,27]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional meetings involve extensive sitting, which negatively impacts the health of attendees. Understanding how technology can facilitate integrating physical activity into the workplace, such as in walking meetings, is vital to improving workplace wellbeing. To that end, we applied a mixed-method approach to explore requirements and opportunities for walking meetings. We conducted an online questionnaire and a series of interviews with early adopters of walking meetings and created design fictions based on their feedback. We evaluated the design fictions with a second questionnaire and garnered additional feedback from the original early adopters. Based on our findings, we derived four dimensions associated with walking meetings: practical, environmental, social, and cognitive facets. We define attributes, challenges, and opportunities within these dimensions which are important for designing systems that support walking meetings. Our work identifies key considerations for developing systems that integrate physical activity into communication activities.
... Previous work did research position changes through modular meeting furniture [15] or strongly emphasized the potential of walking meetings [1-3, 13, 16]. Ahtinen et al. [1][2][3] developed and researched the use of mobile technology to mediate walking meetings, whereas Damen et al. [13,17] implemented a service design for walking meetings called the WorkWalk [13,17]. Both research teams gained users insights on the barriers and drivers of walking meetings and provided some design recommendations [1,17]. ...
... Previous work did research position changes through modular meeting furniture [15] or strongly emphasized the potential of walking meetings [1-3, 13, 16]. Ahtinen et al. [1][2][3] developed and researched the use of mobile technology to mediate walking meetings, whereas Damen et al. [13,17] implemented a service design for walking meetings called the WorkWalk [13,17]. Both research teams gained users insights on the barriers and drivers of walking meetings and provided some design recommendations [1,17]. ...
... Ahtinen et al. [1][2][3] developed and researched the use of mobile technology to mediate walking meetings, whereas Damen et al. [13,17] implemented a service design for walking meetings called the WorkWalk [13,17]. Both research teams gained users insights on the barriers and drivers of walking meetings and provided some design recommendations [1,17]. What remains however underexplored is how technology can support the practice of walking meetings in order to overcome barriers and strengthen opportunities for users. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
As an active form of meeting, walking meetings can be beneficial for office workers who often have a sedentary work routine. Despite their substantial benefits in terms of health, social interactions, and creativity, walking meetings are not yet widely adopted. Some key barriers limiting their social acceptance and wider adoption, for instance, the difficulty to present files or take notes, might be addressed by technology. Using the Hubs - a network of stand-up meeting stations - as a design exemplar, we conducted a scenario-based survey (N = 186) to provide insights into how technological solutions can support the practice of walking meetings. Focusing on the size of the group and type of meetings, we identify scenarios of use and discuss design implications for the development of future technologies and service design components to support walking meetings.
... Digital transformations have contributed to eliminating physical movement in the workplace (Choi et al., 2016;Cambo et al., 2017;Brombacher et al., 2020;Damen et al., 2020) through enhancing connectivity between remote workers (Haliburton and Schmidt, 2020), and intensifying technologymediated collaboration (Deloitte LLP, 2018;Haliburton and Schmidt, 2020). The use of such collaborating technologies does not mediate the benefits of informal, face-to-face interaction, as well as physical activity for the wellbeing of the remote workers (Haliburton and Schmidt, 2020). ...
Article
Full-text available
As the COVID-19 pandemic has forced many to work remotely from home, collaborating solely through digital technologies, a growing population of remote home workers are faced with profound wellbeing challenges. Passive sensing devices and ambient feedback have great potential to support the wellbeing of the remote workers, but there is a lack of background and understanding of the domestic workplace in terms of physical and affective dimensions and challenges to wellbeing. There are profound research gaps on wellbeing in the domestic workplace, with the current push for remote home and hybrid working making this topic timely. To address these gaps and shape a starting point for an “ambient workspaces” agenda, we conducted an exploratory study to map physical and affective aspects of working from home. The study involved both qualitative and quantitative measures of occupant experience, including sensor wristbands, and a custom web application for self-reporting mood and aspects of the environment. It included 13 participants for a period of 4 weeks, during a period of exclusive home working. Based on quantitative and qualitative analysis, our study addresses wellbeing challenges of the domestic workplace, establishes correlations between mood and physical aspects, and discusses the impact of feedback mechanisms in the domestic workplace on the behavior of remote workers. Insights from these observations are then used to inform a future design agenda for ambient technologies that supports the wellbeing of remote workers; addressing the design opportunities for ambient interventions in domestic workspaces. This work offers three contributions: 1) qualitatively and quantitatively informed understandings of the experiences of home-workers; 2) a future design agenda for “ambient home workspaces”; and 3) we propose three design concepts for ambient feedback and human–AI interactions in the built environment, to illustrate the utility of the design agenda.
Book
Full-text available
La promoción de hábitos de vida saludables y del bienestar integral de la ciudadanía constituye un objetivo sólidamente compartido por las instituciones universitarias en el ejercicio de su responsabilidad social. La Universidad de Burgos (UBu), miembro de la Red Española de Universidades Promotoras de la Salud (REUPS), contribuye, con fuerza incremental al ODS 3 - Salud y Bienestar de la Agenda 2030, dirigido a garantizar una vida sana, y promover el bienestar para todos y todas con independencia de la edad. De acuerdo con el Informe de Responsabilidad Social de la Universidad de Burgos 2021 y las líneas de acción del Aula Campus Saludable de la UBu, este objetivo, extensible a las entidades sanitarias locales, regionales, estatales y globales, se articula en el diseño, ejecución y evaluación de proyectos y programas intencionalmente orientados. En el ejercicio de su responsabilidad en la transferencia del conocimiento e innovación, la presente guía ofrece, de forma pionera, un amplio y selecto conjunto de buenas prácticas para la promoción de hábitos saludables en el contexto universitario iberoamericano, reflejo de la intensa actividad desarrollada en los países participantes en su redacción.
Article
Full-text available
Background: There is increasing interest in the role that technology can play in improving the vitality of knowledge workers. A promising and widely adopted strategy to attain this goal is to reduce sedentary behavior (SB) and increase physical activity (PA). In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art SB and PA interventions using technology in the office environment. By scoping the existing landscape, we identified current gaps and underexplored possibilities. We discuss opportunities for future development and research on SB and PA interventions using technology. Methods: A systematic search was conducted in the Association for Computing Machinery digital library, the interdisciplinary library Scopus, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Xplore Digital Library to locate peer-reviewed scientific articles detailing SB and PA technology interventions in office environments between 2009 and 2019. Results: The initial search identified 1130 articles, of which 45 studies were included in the analysis. Our scoping review focused on the technologies supporting the interventions, which were coded using a grounded approach. Conclusion: Our findings showed that current SB and PA interventions using technology provide limited possibilities for physically active ways of working as opposed to the common strategy of prompting breaks. Interventions are also often offered as additional systems or services, rather than integrated into existing office infrastructures. With this work, we have mapped different types of interventions and provide an increased understanding of the opportunities for future multidisciplinary development and research of technologies to address sedentary behavior and physical activity in the office context.
Article
Full-text available
Physical inactivity and chronic stress at work increase the risks of developing metabolic disorders, mental illnesses, and musculoskeletal injuries, threatening office workers’ physical and psychological well-being. Although several guidelines and interventions have been developed to prevent theses subhealth issues, their effectiveness and health benefits are largely limited when they cannot match workday contexts. This paper presents LightSit, a health-promoting system that helps people reduce physically inactive behaviors and manage chronic stress at work. LightSit comprises a sensor mat that can be embedded into an office chair for measuring a user’s sitting posture and heart rate variability and a lighting display that is integrated into a monitor stand to present information unobtrusively, facilitating fitness and relaxation exercises during microbreaks. Following the showroom approach, we evaluated LightSit during a public exhibition at Dutch Design Week 2018. During the eight days of the exhibition, we observed more than 500 sessions of experiences with healthy microbreaks using our prototype. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 50 participants who had office-based jobs and had experienced LightSit. Our qualitative findings indicated the potential benefits of LightSit in facilitating health-promoting behaviors during office work. Based on the insights learned from this study, we discuss the implications for future designs of interactive health-promoting systems.
Article
Full-text available
Background: There is a clear public health need to reduce office workers' sedentary behaviors (SBs), especially in the workplace. Digital technologies are increasingly being deployed in the workplace to measure and modify office workers' SBs. However, knowledge of the range and nature of research on this topic is limited; it also remains unclear to what extent digital interventions have exploited the technological possibilities. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the technological landscape of digital interventions for SB reduction in office workers and to map the research activity in this field. Methods: Terms related to SB, office worker, and digital technology were applied in various combinations to search Cochrane Library, Joanna Briggs Institute Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, Scopus, Association for Computing Machinery Digital Library, Engineering index Compendex, and Google Scholar for the years 2000 to 2017. Data regarding the study and intervention details were extracted. Interventions and studies were categorized into development, feasibility and/piloting, evaluation, or implementation phase based on the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions. A novel framework was developed to classify technological features and annotate technological configurations. A mix of quantitative and qualitative approaches was used to summarize data. Results: We identified 68 articles describing 45 digital interventions designed to intervene with office workers' SB. A total of 6 common technological features had been applied to interventions with various combinations. Configurations such as "information delivery and mediated organizational and social support" and "digital log and automated tailored feedback" were well established in evaluation and implementation studies; in contrast, the integration of passive data collection, connected devices, and ATF or scheduled prompts was mostly present in development and piloting research. Conclusions: This review is the first to map and describe the use of digital technologies in research on SB reduction in office workers. Interdisciplinary collaborations can help to maximize the potential of technologies. As novel modes of delivery that capitalize on embedded computing and electronics, wireless technologies have been developed and piloted in engineering, computing, and design fields, efforts can be directed to move them to the next phase of evaluation with more rigorous study designs. Quality of research may be improved by fostering conversations between different research communities and encouraging researchers to plan, conduct, and report their research under the MRC framework. This review will be particularly informative to those deciding on areas where further research or development is needed and to those looking to locate the relevant expertise, resources, and design inputs when designing their own systems or interventions.
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a field study on using peer-based cooperative fitness tracking (PCFT) to promote workplace fitness. The social bonding achieved through a collective fitness goal and the sharing of fitness data between two co-workers has been explored as a motivational factor that can encourage physical activity. The study involved 10 dyads of co-workers in two groups (a distributed vs. a co-located group) based on their proximity at work. The effectiveness of the proposed PCFT was examined by comparing fitness data over a period of three weeks: the baseline week, the PCFT intervention week, and the post-intervention week. The proximity effects on PCFT were investigated by comparing the fitness data, goal commitment, and interview results between the two groups. The quantitative results showed that the physical activity of participants in the co-located group improved significantly after the PCFT intervention. The qualitative results suggested that PCFT may improve the awareness of being physically active, stimulate exchange of knowledge to support active lifestyles and facilitate including fitness breaks in the daily work routine. Based on these findings, we discuss design implications for the future development of the PCFT-based applications and their potential contribution to increased office vitality.
Article
Full-text available
Background Mobile technologies have great potential to promote an active lifestyle in lower educated working young adults, an underresearched target group at a high risk of low activity levels. Objective The objective of our study was to examine the effect and process evaluation of the newly developed evidence- and theory-based smartphone app “Active Coach” on the objectively measured total daily physical activity; self-reported, context-specific physical activity; and self-reported psychosocial variables among lower educated working young adults. Methods We recruited 130 lower educated working young adults in this 2-group cluster randomized controlled trial and assessed outcomes at baseline, posttest (baseline+9 weeks), and follow-up (posttest+3 months). Intervention participants (n=60) used the Active Coach app (for 9 weeks) combined with a Fitbit activity tracker. Personal goals, practical tips, and educational facts were provided to encourage physical activity. The control group received print-based generic physical activity information. Both groups wore accelerometers for objective measurement of physical activity, and individual interviews were conducted to assess the psychosocial variables and context-specific physical activity. Furthermore, intervention participants were asked process evaluation questions and generalized linear mixed models and descriptive statistics were applied. ResultsNo significant intervention effects were found for objectively measured physical activity, self-reported physical activity, and self-reported psychosocial variables (all P>.05). Intervention participants evaluated the Active Coach app and the combined use with the Fitbit wearable as self-explanatory (36/51, 70.6%), user friendly (40/51, 78.4%), and interesting (34/51, 66.7%). Throughout the intervention, we observed a decrease in the frequency of viewing graphical displays in the app (P
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Extended periods of uninterrupted sedentary behavior are detrimental to long-term health. While prolonged sitting is prevalent among information workers, it is difficult for them to break prolonged sedentary behavior due to the nature of their work. This work aims to understand information workers' intentions & practices around standing or moving breaks. We developed Time for Break, a break prompting system that enables people to set their desired work duration and prompts them to stand up or move. We conducted an exploratory field study (N = 25) with Time for Break to collect participants' work & break intentions and behaviors for three weeks, followed by semi-structured interviews. We examined rich contexts affecting participants' receptiveness to standing or moving breaks, and identified how their habit strength and self-regulation are related to their break-taking intentions & practices. We discuss design implications for interventions to break up periods of prolonged sedentary behavior in workplaces.
Conference Paper
" Prolonged sitting at the workplace is a growing public health concern. In this paper, we propose the activity-focused design framework which provides an overview of recent work in HCI to stimulate physcial activity or to reduce sedentary behavior. Next, based on this framework, we present Stimulight, an intelligent system designed to explore the effect of providing personal and/or social feedback on the activity pattern of office workers. To test the intuitiveness of the feedback modalities of our design, three different feedback conditions were explored in a lab study with 61 participants. Our results show a positive effect of visualizing and sharing physical activity patterns with co-workers. Based on our findings, we present design implications and offer perspectives for future work on how to use social feedback mechanisms to encourage social interaction in the workplace to enhance physically active behavior among office workers.
Article
It turns out that taking care of worker health and well-being is the most effective way to increase engagement and performance. Putting yourself and your health first isn't selfish; it's exactly what we all need to do to make our businesses thrive. It is a minimum requirement for doing your job well, and the perfect New Year's reso.lution. This article offers a comprehensive list of the "don'ts," with suggestions on what to do instead, including strategies that increase movement and exercise, improve sleep and eating habits, reduce stress, improve air quality, and reduce chronic and infectious disease in medical offices. Healthy workers are more productive. The most obvious benefits to the bottom line are the avoidance of healthcare costs, but companies that make investments in employee health and wellbeing also are seeing increases in creativity, engagement, and productivity, and, as a result, business growth.
Conference Paper
Prolonged sitting time in adults has become a major societal issue with far-reaching health, economic, and social consequences. The objective of this study is to reduce sedentary behaviour in office workers by integrating physical activity with work. In this case study, we present Workwalk, a concept to encourage and facilitate office workers to have a walking meeting. This idea arose by merging a traditional health research approach with an iterative design process. With this method, it was possible to integrate behaviour change techniques into an interaction design process effectively.