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Abstract

Finding out methods or ways to improve people's health is always focused. How to have beautiful hair is what both men and women want. In order to achieve that, people used natural ingredients to nourish their hair in addition to modern Western medical therapies. The paper was based on sources of journals, documents as well as the survey results completed by patients and foreigners living in Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam. The research paper once again determines the importance of folk therapies as well as some great herbs in this country.

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Patients presenting with hair loss should be screened by medical history, dietary history and physical exam for risk factors for nutrient deficiency. If warranted, laboratory studies may be performed. In patients with no risk factors, further laboratory evaluation searching for nutritional deficiencies is not warranted. For patients with nutritional deficiencies, it is clear that those deficiencies should be corrected. Further research is required to determine whether any benefit exists for nutrient supplementation in the absence of documented deficiency. At this time, patients must be informed that such research is lacking and that in fact some supplements carry the risk of worsening hair loss or the risk of toxicity.
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Herbal medicine is still the mainstay of about 70-80% of the world population mainly in the developing countries for Primary Health Care because of better cultural acceptability better, compatibility with the human body and lesser medicine or only palliative therapy is available. Even in this era of antibiotics, radiotherapy and strict drug laws, a very large number of herbal products are consumed and marketed throughout the world as health nutrients, food supplements, and curing agents for disease control. It has been observed that a number of herbs and their extract are used for hair growth activities some are described as follow: Petroleum ether extract of aerial parts of Tridax procumbens showed luxurious growth of hair in albino rats. Nearly 70% ethanolic extract of leaves of Ginko biloba was shown to be effective for hair growth activity. Methanolic extract of Potyporus umbellatus has shown excellent hair growth activity in rats. Combined extract Emblica officinalis, Lawsonia inermis, Nardostachys jatamansi, Cyperus rotundus and Corchorus prevent the falling of hairs and enhancement of hair growth activity. Proanthocyanidins from grape seeds promote the proliferation of mouse hair follicle cell in vitro and convert hair cycle in vivo similar to Minoxidil 2% solution which is synthetic and has numbers of side effect. Herbal cosmetics are in vogue these days. Nowadays, people have become aware of using herbal cosmetics. Now a day's cosmetology is a well-defined science based on experiences gathered over centuries. The safety and efficacy of natural herbs could not find any suitable match i.e., cannot be replaced by synthetics. There is once again revival of preference for natural products.
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ABSTRACT Objective: The present study was carried out in order to study the hair growth activity of some traditional herbal medicinal plants. Herbal traditional drugs are used frequently in therapeutics; more often their chief principles are employed in a more specific manner. Method: Centella asiatica, Cyperus rotundus & Emblica officinalis alcoholic and aqueous extract were prepared and evaluated for the hair growth properties using albino rats. The hair growth formulation was formulated as hair oil and applied topically on shaved skin of rats. Primary skin irritation test, hair length, hair density test were performed. The hair growth-promoting efficacies were evaluated at 0 day, 10 days, 15 days, and 20 days after the application through the hair re-growth area significant hair growth was observed and the hair growth was compared with the standard drug used 2% solution of minoxidil. Result: The result revealed that the hair growth activity of each drug was found proportional to the concentration range tested and compared with standard (2% minoxidil ethanolic solution) by an enlargement of follicular size and prolongation of the anagen phase. It holds the promise of potent herbal alternative for minoxidil. Conclusion: Excellent results of hair growth were observed in formulations prepared by cloth pouch decoction method for preparation of hair oils.
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Herbs & herbal drugs are clinically proved good for hair growth. Hair loss problem is of great concern to both males & females & the main problems associated with hair loss are hair fading, dandruff & falling of hair. Various synthetic medicines are available for hair loss which does not treat permanently & also shows severe side effects. The main objective of this work is to develop such an herbal hair oil formulation which can resolve the problem related to hair fall & other hair diseases. Herbal drugs like Emblica officinalis, Bacopa monniera and Cyperus rotundus were selected for the formulations of poly herbal hair oil. The hair oil was prepared individually and in a varying concentration of all three herbs and a mixture of all the three herbs in fixed proportion using coconut oil as base. The formulated oil in varying concentration was evaluated physical, chemical and hair growth properties of formulated oil by applying it topically on shaved skin of albino rats. Primary skin irritation test, hair length test were performed and the hair growth was compared with standard Minoxidil 2% ethanolic solution using healthy albino rats. It was observed that hair oil formulation (HF3) showed the best result among the other formulation evaluated by showing an enlargement of follicular size and prolongation of the anagen phase.
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The purpose of this study was to determine the hair growth effects of lavender oil (LO) in female C57BL/6 mice. The experimental animals were divided into a normal group (N: saline), a vehicle control group (VC: jojoba oil), a positive control group (PC: 3% minoxidil), experimental group 1 (E1: 3% LO), and experimental group 2 (E2: 5% LO). Test compound solutions were topically applied to the backs of the mice (100 μL per application), once per day, 5 times a week, for 4 weeks. The changes in hair follicle number, dermal thickness, and hair follicle depth were observed in skin tissues stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and the number of mast cells was measured in the dermal and hypodermal layers stained with toluidine blue. PC, E1, and E2 groups showed a significantly increased number of hair follicles, deepened hair follicle depth, and thickened dermal layer, along with a significantly decreased number of mast cells compared to the N group. These results indicated that LO has a marked hair growth-promoting effect, as observed morphologically and histologically. There was no significant difference in the weight of the thymus among the groups. However, both absolute and relative weights of the spleen were significantly higher in the PC group than in the N, VC, E1, or E2 group at week 4. Thus, LO could be practically applied as a hair growth-promoting agent.
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We report the case of a 41-year-old female showing severe hair loss approximately 90% after the use of a hair dye. These symptoms developed six days after the use of a hair dye containing PPD. A patch test showed a (++) reaction at 48 h to 1% PPD in petrolatum, whereas all metals and white petrolatum were negative. She was therefore diagnosed with contact dermatitis due to PPD, resulting in hair loss. The skin lesions gradually improved after starting treatment with the systemic corticosteroids. The possibility that allergic contact dermatitis from hair dyes may be responsible for telogen effluvium should always be considered in a patient with increased hair loss.
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The literature reveals what little is known about nutritional factors and hair loss. What we do know emanates from studies in protein-energy malnutrition, starvation, and eating disorders. In otherwise healthy individuals, nutritional factors appear to play a role in subjects with persistent increased hair shedding. Hård, 40 years ago, demonstrated the importance of iron supplements in nonanaemic, iron-deficient women with hair loss. Serum ferritin concentrations provide a good assessment of an individual's iron status. Rushton et al. first published data showing that serum ferritin concentrations were a factor in female hair loss and, 10 years later, Kantor et al. confirmed this association. What level of serum ferritin to employ in subjects with increased hair shedding is yet to be definitively established but 70 micro g/L, with a normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate (< 10 mm/h), is recommended. The role of the essential amino acid, l-lysine in hair loss also appears to be important. Double-blind data confirmed the findings of an open study in women with increased hair shedding, where a significant proportion responded to l-lysine and iron therapy. There is no evidence to support the popular view that low serum zinc concentrations cause hair loss. Excessive intakes of nutritional supplements may actually cause hair loss and are not recommended in the absence of a proven deficiency. While nutritional factors affect the hair directly, one should not forget that they also affect the skin. In the management of subjects with hair loss, eliminating scaling problems is important as is good hair care advice and the need to explain fully the hair cycle. Many individuals reduced their shampooing frequency due to fear of losing more hair but this increases the amount seen in subsequent shampoos fuelling their fear of going bald and adversely affecting their quality of life.
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Alopecia is usually treatable and self-limited, but it may be permanent. Careful diagnosis of the type of hair loss will aid in selecting effective treatment. Reassurance is an important component of any treatment regimen.
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The purpose of this paper is to help authors to think about ways to present qualitative research papers in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. It also discusses methods for reviewers to assess the rigour, quality, and usefulness of qualitative research. Examples of different ways to present data from interviews, observations, and focus groups are included. The paper concludes with guidance for publishing qualitative research and a checklist for authors and reviewers.
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Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common form of hair loss in men, and female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is the most common form of hair loss in women. Traditional methods of treating hair loss have included minoxidil, finasteride, and surgical transplantation. Currently there is a myriad of new and experimental treatments. In addition, low-level light therapy (LLLT) has recently been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of hair loss. There are several theories and minimal clinical evidence of the safety and efficacy of LLLT, although most experts agree that it is safe. More in vitro studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanism and effectiveness at the cellular level, and more controlled studies are necessary to assess the role of this new treatment in the general population.
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Unlabelled: Male and female pattern hair loss affects a large percentage of the population, and patients frequently present for treatment of this to their dermatologist. Here we review the many treatments available for hair loss. We review the evidence for each, and outline the most effective treatment strategies for both men and women. Learning objective: At the conclusion of this article, the reader should be able to describe the most effective treatments for hair loss, understand their mechanism(s) of action, and explain which treatments are the best in different settings.
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To describe an organized diagnostic approach for both nonscarring and scarring alopecias to help family physicians establish an accurate in-office diagnosis. To explain when ancillary laboratory workup is necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Current diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for hair loss are based on randomized controlled studies, uncontrolled studies, and case series. MEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to December 1998 with the MeSH words alopecia, hair, and alopecia areata. Articles were selected on the basis of experimental design, with priority given to the most current large multicentre controlled studies. Overall global evidence for therapeutic intervention for hair loss is quite strong. The most common forms of nonscarring alopecias are androgenic alopecia, telogen effluvium, and alopecia areata. Other disorders include trichotillomania, traction alopecia, tinea capitis, and hair shaft abnormalities. Scarring alopecia is caused by trauma, infections, discoid lupus erythematosus, or lichen planus. Key to establishing an accurate diagnosis is a detailed history, including medication use, systemic illnesses, endocrine dysfunction, hair-care practices, and family history. All hair-bearing sites should be examined. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the scalp is useful, particularly to diagnose scarring alopecias. Once a diagnosis has been established, specific therapy can be initiated. Diagnosis and management of hair loss is an interesting challenge for family physicians. An organized approach to recognizing characteristic differential features of hair loss disorders is key to diagnosis and management.
Towards a molecular understanding of hair loss and its treatment
  • G Cotsarelis
  • S E Millar
Cotsarelis G, Millar SE. "Towards a molecular understanding of hair loss and its treatment". Trends in molecular medicine, vol 7, no. 7, pp. 293-301. Jul. 2001.
Method to reduce hair loss and stimulate hair regrowth". United States patent US 6
  • M Schwartz
  • B J Freund
Schwartz M, Freund BJ, inventors. "Method to reduce hair loss and stimulate hair regrowth". United States patent US 6,299,893, Oct. 2001.