ArticlePDF Available

Biological Potential of Tribulus terrestris

Authors:

Abstract

Plants have a significant role in preserving human health and improving quality of life. gokshura (Tribulus terrestris Linn.) one of such plants, is mentioned in Ayurvedic texts for various therapeutic properties like balya(strengthening), brimhana (nutritive), rasayana(rejuvenator), mootrala(diuretic), shothahara(anti-inflammatory), vajikarana (aphrodisiac) etc. and useful in the management of mutrakrichhra (dysurea), ashmari (renal calculi) etc. It is a perennial plant, grown predominantly in India and Africa. Its extract contains alkaloids, saponins, resins, flavanoids and nitrates. As its therapeutic values, a review has been done to gather information on different aspects of gokshura. Further Ayurvedic references, the present paper also emphasizes on recent researches carried out on this plant for its pharmacological evaluation. Keywords: Tribulus terrestris, Diuretic, Pharmacology
Dighe et al Journal of Drug Delivery & Therapeutics. 2020; 10(3):262-264
ISSN: 2250-1177 [262] CODEN (USA): JDDTAO
Available online on 15.05.2020 at http://jddtonline.info
Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics
Open Access to Pharmaceutical and Medical Research
© 2011-18, publisher and licensee JDDT, This is an Open Access article which permits
unrestricted non-commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited
Open Access Review Article
Biological Potential of Tribulus terrestris
Shantanu U. Dighe*, R.S. Jadhav, D.N. Vikhe
Department of Pharmacognosy, Pravara Rural College of Pharmacy, Pravaranagar, A/P. Loni BK. Tal. Rahata, Dist. A. Nagar, (Maharashtra) India
ABSTRACT
Plants have a significant role in preserving human health and improving quality of life. gokshura (Tribulus terrestris Linn.) one of such plants, is
mentioned in Ayurvedic texts for various therapeutic properties like balya(strengthening), brimhana (nutritive), rasayana(rejuvenator),
mootrala(diuretic), shothahara(anti-inflammatory), vajikarana (aphrodisiac) etc. and useful in the management of mutrakrichhra (dysurea),
ashmari (renal calculi) etc. It is a perennial plant, grown predominantly in India and Africa. Its extract contains alkaloids, saponins, resins,
flavanoids and nitrates. As its therapeutic values, a review has been done to gather information on different aspects of gokshura. Further
Ayurvedic references, the present paper also emphasizes on recent researches carried out on this plant for its pharmacological evaluation.
Keywords: Tribulus terrestris, Diuretic, Pharmacology
Article Info: Received 22 Feb 2020; Review Completed 19 April 2020; Accepted 27 April 2020; Available online 15 May 2020
Cite this article as:
Dighe SU, Jadhav RS, Vikhe DN, Biological Potential of Tribulus terrestris, Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics. 2020;
10(3):262-264 http://dx.doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v10i3.3982
*Address for Correspondence:
Shantanu U. Dighe, Department of Pharmacognosy, Pravara Rural College of Pharmacy, Pravaranagar, A/P. Loni BK. Tal.
Rahata, Dist. A. Nagar, (Maharashtra) India
Introduction:
Tribulus terrestris (gokshura) is a procumbent annual herb
and belongs to Zygophyllaceae family.1 It is native to
southern Europe, Africa, temperate and tropical Asia.2
Tribulus terrestris is developed to warm, moderate regions
and is predominant in areas having hot summers and dry
soils. In India, Tribulus terrestris is found primarily on loose
and compact sandy loam soils, and reportedly grows on sand
hills in the desert regions.3
Pharmacological Activity:
Aphrodisiac activity:
Gokshura is highlighted to be a vajikara dravya
(aphrodisiac).4 Studies reported that, furastanolic type of
saponin present in T. terrestris increases the amount of
luteinizing hormone (LH), motivate spermatogenesis and
results in motivation of Testosterone. These activities may
help in civilizing the quality and quantity of sperm
significantly.5 Furostanol saponin extract from T. terrestris
shows positive effect on spermatogenesis of rams during
breeding season with increase in count of spermatozoids,
time of viability and sperm motility.6
Diuretic activity:
The plant is found to be helpful in diuresis. Potassium and
rich amount of nitrates present in the plant may be
responsible for this activity.7
Urolithiatic activity:
Ethanolic extract of the fruits of Tribulus terrestris displayed
significant dose dependent protection against uroliths
induced by glass bead implantation in albino rats.8
Effect on hypertension:
Decreased systolic blood pressure was reported with the
treatment of lyophilized aqueous extractof tribulus fruits.9
gokshura ghana (solid aqueous extract) is reported to be
used in mild to temperate essential hypertension.10
Anti-hyperlipidemic effect:
Methanolic extract of Tribulus terrestris show hypolipidemic
effect.11 Saponins of Tribulus terrestris were found to
significantly lower serum total cholesterol, low density
lipoprotein cholesterol and liver total cholesterol,
triglycerides in diet-induced hyperlipidemia in mice.12
Effect on diabetes mellitus:
Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and significant recovery
of liver was found in treated rats.13 T. terrestris methanolic
extract caused a significant decrease in blood glucose level
and glycosylated haemoglobin.12 In another study,
methanolic extract of T.terrestris showed significant
decrease in blood sugar level.7
Dighe et al Journal of Drug Delivery & Therapeutics. 2020; 10(3):262-264
ISSN: 2250-1177 [263] CODEN (USA): JDDTAO
Cardio-protective effect:
Hydro-alcoholic lyophilized extract of whole plant of
Tribulus terrestris has been reported to have cardio-
protective function. The fraction is reported to attenuate
myocardial infarction in rats.14
Analgesic effect:
Methanolic extract of fruits reported to have analgesic
activity. The extract also found to have smaller gastric
ulcerogenic activity as compared to Indomethacin.15
Antispasmodic activity:
Significant decrease was found in peristaltic movement of
sheep ureter and rabbit jejunum when treated with
liopihilized saponin extract of dried and powered Tribulus
terrestris.16
Anti-microbial activity:
Spirosponin, ethnolic extract of the fruit and leaves of
Tribulus terrestris has activity against E. coli and S. aurue.17
Hexanoic and methanolic extracts of the plant showed
significant activity against bacteria like E. coli,Pseudomonas
aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris and
Staphylococcus aureus.6 Tribulosin andsitosterol glycosides
present in 50% methanolic extract of T.terrestris reported to
possess anti-helminthic properties.17 Steroidal saponins
from T.terrestris Linn. have antifungal action again
stfluconazole-resistant fungi (Candida albicans,Candida
glabrata, Candida parapsilosis,Candida tropicalis, Candida
krusei, andCryptococcus neoformans).18
Cytotoxic effect:
T.terrestris of different regions (Bulgaria, Chinaand India)
and different parts of plants (stem and fruit) shows that only
the spiro compounds exhibit remarkable activity. The
inhibitory effect of saponin mixture from Chinese origin on
Bcap37 breast cancer cell has potent inhibitory effect.19 In
another study, data showed that Tribulus terrestris aqueous
extract blocks proliferation and induces apoptosis in human
liver cancer cells through the inhibition of NF_B signalling
and can be used as an anticancer drug for hepato cellular
carcinoma patients.20 Total extract of the Bulgarian
T.terrestris has a marked dose-dependent inhibitory effect
on viability of breast cancer cells whereas saponin fraction
has increased inhibitory effect compared to the total extract.
Morphologicalchanges and DNA fragmentation were
observed as markers for early and late apoptosis in tumor
cells after treatment. In the mechanisms of antitumor
activity of T.terrestris apoptotic processes are involved.
Apoptotic processes showed selective antitumor activity of
Bulgarian Tribulus terrestris Linn. on human cancer cells in
vitro.21
Wound healing action:
The leaves of Tribulus terrestris are used traditionally in
folklore for the treatment of various kinds of wounds.
Aqueous extract in carbopol at 2.5% and 5% concentrations
showed significant reduction in period of epithelisation and
wound contraction by 50% in excision and burn wound
models. In the incision wound model a significant increase in
the breaking strength was observed.22
Nutritional values:
Tribulus terrestris is found to be rich source of calcium.23
Contraindications:
Use of drug is contraindicated in dehydration24and
pregnancy.25
References:
1 Sharma PC, Yelne MB, Dennis TJ. Database on Medicinal plants
used in Ayurveda and Sidha. New Delhi: CCRAS, Dept. of AYUSH,
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Govt. of India; vol 3.
2000. p.229.
2 Parker KF. An Illustrated Guide to Arizona Weeds. Tucson
(AZ):The University of Arizona Press. 1972, p.338.
3 Pathak, PS. Contributions to the ecology of Tribulus terrestris
Linn. II. Habitat studies, Agra University Journal of Research
Science 1970; 19(2):149-166.
4 Dhanwantari. Dhanvantari Nighantu. Sharma PV, Sharma GP.
editor, reprint edition. Varanasi: Chaukhambha Orientalia, 2008,
p. 34.
5. Abbas A. Al-Amiery MAAH, Al-Mosowy AAH, Abbas AH. Study the
biological activities of Tribulus terrestris extracts . Journal of
Biotechnology Research Center 2010; 4(1):55-60.
6. Kistanova E, Zlatev H, Karcheva V, Kolev A.Effect of plant Tribulus
terrestris extract on reproductive performances of rams.
Biotechnology in Animal Husbandry, 2005; 21(1-2):55-63.
7. Ukani MD, Nanavati DD, Mehta NK. A Review on the Ayurvedic
herb Tribulus terrestris L. Ancient Science of Life 1997;
17(2):144-150. PubMed PMID: 22556836.
8. Anand R, Patnaik GK, Kulshreshtha DK. Dhawan BN, Activity of
certain fractions of Tribulus terrestris fruits against
experimentally induced urolithiasis in rats, Indian journal of
experimental biology. Indian J Exp Biol 1994; 32(8):548-552.
PubMed PMID: 7959935.
9. Sharifi AM. Radbod Darabi, Nasrin Akbarloo, Study of
antihypertensive mechanism of Tribulus terrestris in 2K1C
hypertensive rats. Role of tissue ACE activity, Life sciences
2003; 73(2003):2963-297. PubMed PMID: 14519445.
10. Murthy AR, Dubey SD, Tripathi K. Anti-hypertensive effect of
Gokshura (Tribulus terrestris Linn.) A clinical study, Ancient
Science of Life 2000; XIX(3-4):139-145.
11. EI-Tantawy WH, Hassanin LA. Hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic
effects of alcoholic extracts of Tribulus alatus in streptozotocin-
induced diabetic rats: A comparative study with T. terrestris,
Indian journal of experimental biology 2007; 45:785-90.
12. Shudi C, Weijing Q, Xiufeng P, Bin S. Huang Xiaoqing, Effect of
Saponin from Tribulus terrestris on Hyperlipidemia. Journal of
Chinese Medicinal Material 2003; 26(5):2003-5. PubMed PMID:
14535016.
13. Amin AMR. Mohamed Lotfy, Mohamed Shafiullah, Ernest
Adeghate, The Protective Effect of Tribulus terrestris in
Diabetes. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 2006;
1084(2006):391-40. PubMed PMID: 17151317. doi:
10.1196/annals.1372.005.
14. Ojha SK, Nandave M, Arora S, Narang N, Dinda AK, Arya DS.
Chronic Administration of Tribulus terrestris Linn. extracts
improves cardiac function and Attenuates Myocardial Infarction
in Rats, International Journal of Pharmacology 2008; 4(1):1-10.
15. Heidari MR, Mehrabani M, Pardakhty A, Khazaeli P, Zahedi MJ,
Yakhchali M, et al. The Analgesic Effect of Tribulus terrestris
Extract and Comparison of Gastric Ulcerogenicity of the Extract
with Indomethacine in Animal Experiments. Annals of the New
York Academy of Sciences 2007; 1095(2007):418-427. PubMed
PMID: 17404054. doi: 10.1196/annals.1397.045.
16. Arcasoy HB, Erenmemisoglu A, Tekol Y, Kurucu S, Kartal M.
Effect of Tribulus terrestris L. saponin mixture on some smooth
muscle preparations: a preliminary study.. Boll Chim Farm
1998; 137(11):473-5. PubMed PMID: 10077881.
17.Joshi DD, Uniyal RC. Different chemo types of Gokhru ( Tribulus
terrestris ): A herb used for improving physique and physical
performance. Int J Green Pharm 2008; 2:158-61.
18. Zhang Jd. Yong bing Cao, Zheng Xu, Hui Hua Sun, In Vitro and in
Vivo Antifungal Activities of the Eight Steroid Saponins from
Dighe et al Journal of Drug Delivery & Therapeutics. 2020; 10(3):262-264
ISSN: 2250-1177 [264] CODEN (USA): JDDTAO
Tribulus terrestris L. with Potent Activity against Fluconazole-
Resistant Fungal. Biol. Pharm. Bull 2005; 28(12):2211-5.
PubMed PMID: 16327151.
19. Sun B, Qu W, Bai Z. The inhibitory effect of saponins from
Tribulus terrestris on Bcap-37 breast cancer cell line in vitro.
Zhong Yao Cai 2003; 26(2):104-106. PubMed PMID: 12795220.
20. Kim HJ, Kim JC, Min JS, Kim MJ, Kim JA, Kor MH, et. al. Aqueous
extract of Tribulus terrestris Linn. induces cell growth arrest
and apoptosis by down-regulating NF_B signaling in liver cancer
cells, Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 2011;136(1):197-203. doi:
10.1016/j.jep.2011.04.060.
21. Angelova S, Gospodinova Z, Krasteva M, Antov G, Lozanov V,
Markov T, et. al. Antitumor activity of Bulgarian herb Tribulus
terrestris L. on human breast cancer cells, J BioSci Biotech 2013;
2(1):25-32.
22. Wesley JJ, Christina AJM, Chidambaranathan N, Ravikumar K.
Wound healing activity of the leaves of Tribulus terrestris
(Linn.) aqueous extract in rats, Journal of Pharmacy Research
2009; 2(5):841-3.
23. Duhan A, Chauhan BM, Punia D. Nutritional value of some non-
conventional plant foods of India. Plant Foods Hum Nutr. Jul
1992; 42(3):193-200.
24. Frawley D, Lad V. The Yoga Of Herbs: An Ayurvedic Guide to
Herbal Medicine. Santa Fe:Lotus Press; 1986. p.169.
25. Bensky D, Gamble A. Chinese Herbal Medicine Materia Medica.
revised editionSeattle: Eastland Press;1993. p.42.
... The genus Tribulus contains 25 species, various members of which are poisonous to grazing animals (Dighe et al., 2020). According to Boulos (2000) the genus Tribulus is represented by nine species in Egypt. ...
... It can be applied directly or used as the main ingredient in many medicines and food supplements (Hashim et al., 2014). Dighe et al. (2020) stated that the plant is used for healing purposes such as strengthening, nutrition, rejuvenation, diuretic, anti-inflammatory, or aphrodisiac agent, and renal calculi. ...
Article
Full-text available
ETHNO-PHYTOTECHNOLOGY combines ethnobotany and biotechnology. This study evaluated the ethnobotanical role, anticancer potential, and allelopathy of Tribulus terrestris L. The ethnobotanical survey of twenty informants used an open-ended questionnaire. T. terrestris contains steroids, saponins, antioxidants, flavonoids, alkaloids, phenolics, proteins, and amino acids. The study investigated cytotoxic effects using six carcinoma cell lines. Hordeum vulgare and Lepidium sativum were used as recipient species in the allelopathy experiments. We found that 95% of the informants stated that T. terrestris is an aggressive species that injures livestock, reduces biodiversity, leads to soil dryness, consumes large amounts of space during the vegetative season, and affects soil pH and the absorption of minerals. Ethanolic extracts produced a significant effect on the prostate (PC3), breast (MCF 7), lung (A549), and liver (HEP-G2) carcinoma cell lines, with IC50 values of 19, 22, 33, and 33μg/mL, respectively. The intestinal carcinoma cell line (CAco2) had an IC50 60μg/mL. The colon (HCT) carcinoma cell line had an IC50 value of 68 μg/mL. Water extracts inhibited the seed germination, plumule length, radicle growth, and fresh and dry matter production of the recipient species. This study demonstrated that T. terrestris is potentially valuable as an anticancer agent and an herbicide against harmful weeds.
... In recent times, an extensive research work [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] has been carried out to prove biological activities and the pharmacology of fruit extracts. The purpose of this work is to generate a database for further analysis of the identified phytochemical and pharma-cological properties of this plant to facilitate future research. ...
Article
Full-text available
The main aim of this work was to analyze through a systematic review the ability of Tribulusterrestris to promote the increase of hormonal levels as a mechanism for the relief of menopausal symptoms. The criteria used for the selection were: studies involving menopausal women and use of Tribulusterrestris as a treatment for sexual dysfunction and / or other menopausal symptoms. The survey of literature shows that women who used Tribulusterrestris had drastic improvement in symptoms such as vaginal lubrication, sensation in the genitals during intercourse and other constructive activities. In this study, we have found a significant increase in bioavailable testosterone after the use of the plant extracts which has great potential in the treatment of sexual intercourse and unique symptoms of menopause.
Article
Full-text available
Diabetes is a predictor of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). There are data suggesting that Tribulus terrestris (TT) saponins act as antidiabetic agents and protect against NAFLD. The effect of saponins may be increased by fermentable fibers such as inulin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of TT saponins and TT saponins plus inulin on the plasma lipid profile and liver fatty acids of rats with induced diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM). The study was performed on 36 male Sprague–Dawley rats divided into two main groups: control and diabetic. Animals of the diabetic (DM) group were fed a high-fat diet and injected with streptozotocin (low doses). Animals of the control group (nDM) were on a regular diet and were injected with buffer. After the injections, the animals were split into subgroups: three non-diabetic (nDM): (i) control (c-C); (ii) saponin-treated rats (C-Sap); (iii) rats treated with saponins + inulin (C-Sap + IN), and three diabetic subgroups (DM): (iv) control (c-DM); (v) saponin-treated rats (DM-Sap); (vi) rats treated with saponins + inulin (DM-Sap + IN). Liver fatty acids were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography, and plasma glucose and lipids were measured. The study showed significant changes in liver morphology, liver fatty acids, plasma lipid profile, and plasma glucose. In summary, supplementation with TT saponins or saponins with inulin for one month decreased the level of steatosis in rats with induced type 2 diabetes. Moreover, there were favorable effects on the plasma lipid profile in the rats. However, additional supplementation with inulin had a negative effect on liver morphology (with a microvesicular type of steatosis) in the non-diabetes group. Moreover, supplementation with inulin had a negative effect on plasma glucose in both diabetic and non-diabetic rats. These data show that a diet enriched with fermentable fibers reveals different effects in different organisms, and not all sources and forms of fiber are beneficial to health.
Article
Full-text available
Tribulus terrestris extract was added to the forage of 8 rams of Pleven Blackhead and Abaci breed once daily in dose l,5g per head for a period of 40 days. Semen parameters and sexual behavior during semen collection were evaluated. It was found that Tribulus terrestris extract improves semen quality of rams: the count of spermatozoids, time of viability and motility of sperms increase. The great number of born lambs after the use of treated rams for insemination confirms high fertility of their semen. All experimental rams manifested a good libido and active sexual behavior.
Article
Full-text available
Gokhshura (Tribulus Linn) of Family Zygophyllaceae is an indigenous plant which has been mentioned in Ayurveda with several clinical properties. The plant finds use in one form or the other in various ayurvedic preparations and this has been made it necessary to review the various studies carried out in its chemistry as well as pharmacology.
Article
In this study the extracts of the Iraqi herb Tribulus terrestris (Al-Hassage or Al-Kutub) was done by using of polar and non polar solvents, then the biological activity of these extractants was studied in two field. First, the antibacterial activity invitro on gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), and gram negative bacteria (E. coli, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aerugiuosa, and Klebsiella pneumonia), all extracts showed considerable activity against all bacteria. Second, the effect of extracts on free serum testosterone level in male mice invivo, the alcoholic, and acetonitrilic extracts showed significant (P < 0.05) increase in free serum testosterone level, and we found that the extracts contained compounds with less genotoxic effects in mice germ cells.
Article
Tribulus terrestris has been used in traditional medicine for relieving rheumatic pain and as an analgesic plant for a long time. In this investigation the analgesic effect of methanolic extract of this plant on male albino mice was evaluated by formalin and tail flick test. Extraction of the fruits of the plant was done by two different methods (suxheletion and percolation) with methanol 80%. The percolated extract was injected intraperitoneally in mice at 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg/kg. The results showed that a dose of 100 mg/kg of percolated extract had the highest significant analgesic effect compared to the control group (P < 0.01) in formalin and tail flick test. There is no significant difference in the analgesic effect of suxheleted and percolated extract. The analgesic effect of the extract was lower than morphine, 2.5 mg/kg in both tests, and higher than ASA 300 mg/kg in chronic phase of pain in formalin test (P < 0.05). Pretreatment of animal with naloxone did not change the analgesia induced by the plant extract in both tests, therefore the involvement of opioid receptor in the analgesic effect of this plant was excluded. The results of ulcerogenic studies indicate that the gastric ulcerogenecity of plant extract is lower than the indomethacin in the rat's stomach. It can therefore be concluded that T. terrestris extract has a suitable analgesic effect and further studies are required to produce a more effective product of this plant to substitute for conventional analgesic drugs.
Article
A medicinal herb Tribulus terrestris Linn has been used to treat various diseases including hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anticancer activity of Tribulus terrestris Linn (TT) in liver cancer cells. The antitumor activity of aqueous TT extract was analyzed by testing the cytotoxicity and the effect on clonogenecity in HepG2 cells. Apoptosis and cell cycle arrest induced by TT were dissected by flow cytometry and its inhibitory effect on NF-κB activity was determined by analyzing the expression levels of NF-κB/IκB subunit proteins. The suppression of NF-κB-regulated gene expression by TT was assessed by RT-PCR. TT extract repressed clonogenecity and proliferation, induced apoptosis, and enhanced accumulation in the G0/G1 phase of liver cancer cells. It also turned out that TT extract inhibited NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression and NF-κB subunit p50 expression, while it enhanced the cellular level of IκBα by inhibiting the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. In addition, IKK activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, TT extract suppressed the transcription of genes associated with cell cycle regulation, anti-apoptosis, and invasion. These data showed that TT extract blocks proliferation and induces apoptosis in human liver cancer cells through the inhibition of NF-κB signaling. Aqueous TT extract can be used as an anticancer drug for hepatocellular carcinoma patients.
Article
The present study was undertaken to evaluate the cardioprotective potential of hydro-alcoholic extract of Tribulus terrestris Linn. (Family; Zygophyllaceae), a traditional medicine used in Indian and Chinese systems of medicine. Wistar male albino rats weighing 150-200 g were randomly divided into three main experimental groups; sham (saline treated only), isoproterenol (ISP) control (saline and ISP) and Tribulus terrestris treatment groups ( T. terrestris and ISP). Saline or T. terrestris extract 250 mg kg<sup>-1</sup> once daily were orally administered for 30 days. Isoproterenol was administered in rats to induce myocardial infarction. On days 29 and 30, the animals of ISP control and T. terrestris treatment group were administered ISP (85 mg kg<sup>-1</sup>, subcutaneously) at an interval of 24 h. On the day 31, 48 h after first dose of ISP, hemodynamic parameters were recorded. After sacrificing the animals the hearts were excised and subjected to biochemical, histopathological and ultrastructural studies. ISP-administration produced a significant decrease in the activities of endogenous antioxidant defence enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and tissue antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH) along with a concomitant increase in the lipid peroxidation product malonaldehyde (MDA). In addition, a significant decrease in the activities of myocardial injury markers i.e., creatine phosphokinase-MB (CK-MB isoenzyme) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was also observed in the heart of ISP control group as compared to sham control. Cardiac dysfunction was observed as a decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), left ventricular rate of peak positive and negative pressure change {(+) and (-) LV dP/dt} and elevated left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) following ISP administration. These functional alterations were supported by severe modifications in histopathological and ultrastructural assessment. Pretreatment with T. terrestris resulted in the increased activities of SOD, CAT, GSHPx and prevention of depletion of tissue glutathione along with inhibition of lipid peroxidation. In addition treatment with T. terrestris decreased the leakage of CK-MB and LDH enzymes from myocardium, there was a significant improvement in cardiac function as evidenced by correction of MAP, HR, LVEDP and contractility and relaxation. The possible underlying mechanism of the cardioprotective effect of T. terrestris could be due to restoration of endogenous myocardial antioxidant status or free radical scavenging activity along with correction of the altered hemodynamic parameters and preservation of histoarchitectural and ultrastructural alterations.