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Speaking to the Interface

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Abstract

Canada is experiencing two dramatic changes in its population profile: (a) an increase in the proportion of Canadians 65 years of age and older and (b) a rapid increase in the ethnic diversification of its population of seniors. These trends are particularly significant in British Columbia, where the proportion of ethnic minority seniors is higher than the rest of Canada. Ethnic minority seniors face unique challenges navigating the interface between their communities and the health care system. In acknowledgment of this phenomenon, Fraser Health Authority in collaboration with the BC Home and Community Care Research Network (HCCRN) held a symposium on Access to Health Care for Ethnic Minority Seniors in April 2007. This two-day event brought together a diverse group of stakeholders to share information and identify gaps in our knowledge around this important topic. The stated objectives of the symposium were to: • Learn about current research on access to health care for ethnic minority seniors, • Explore issues around barriers to access for ethnic minority seniors, and • Facilitate knowledge translation and further collaborative research on this topic
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