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Correction: Generation and Characterisation of Cisplatin-Resistant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Displaying a Stem-Like Signature

Authors:
CORRECTION
Correction: Generation and Characterisation
of Cisplatin-Resistant Non-Small Cell Lung
Cancer Cell Lines Displaying a Stem-Like
Signature
Martin P. Barr, Steven G. Gray, Andreas C. Hoffmann, Ralf A. Hilger, Juergen Thomale,
John D. O’Flaherty, Dean A. Fennell, Derek Richard, John J. O’Leary, Kenneth J. O’Byrne
In Fig 11A of this article [1], the 12h MOR CisR image is duplicated in error as representing
the 4h MOR CisR result. In the revised Fig 11 provided here, the 4h MOR CisR has been
replaced with the correct data from the original experiment. The figure legend has been
updated to clarify methods used to obtain the quantitative results.
The original images underlying the updated Fig 11A are included in S1 and S2 Files of this
notice; S3S6 Files include image and quantitative data supporting the results in Fig 11B. The
original data underlying other results in the article are available upon request from the
authors.
A member of PLOS ONE’s Editorial Board confirmed that the revised version of Fig 11 and
the data provided support the results as reported in the original article.
The authors apologize for the error in the published article.
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OPEN ACCESS
Citation: Barr MP, Gray SG, Hoffmann AC, Hilger
RA, Thomale J, O’Flaherty JD, et al. (2020)
Correction: Generation and Characterisation of
Cisplatin-Resistant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Cell Lines Displaying a Stem-Like Signature. PLoS
ONE 15(5): e0233739. https://doi.org/10.1371/
journal.pone.0233739
Published: May 21, 2020
Copyright: ©2020 Barr et al. This is an open
access article distributed under the terms of the
Creative Commons Attribution License, which
permits unrestricted use, distribution, and
reproduction in any medium, provided the original
author and source are credited.
Fig 11. Cisplatin-DNA adduct formation and immunofluorescence. Lung cancer cell lines were treated with cisplatin for up to
24 h and fixed on Superfrost Gold Slides using ice-cold methanol. Cells were stained overnight at 4˚C using a primary antibody
that specifically recognizes CDDP-GpG DNA adducts (RC-18). Antibody binding was detected using an anti-rat Cy3
1
-labelled
antibody and counterstained using DAPI (1 μg/ml (w/v). Images were acquired on an Axioplan fluorescence microscope (A). The
quantitative data for adduct levels (B) in all cell lines (MOR, H460, A549 and SKMES-1) were measured using the ACAS-6.0 image
analysis system as described in the Materials & Methods section. This CCD camera-based methodology does not deliver
photographic images but directly measures the area of individual nuclei, their DNA content and the levels of Pt adduct-derived
fluorescence signals from automatically selected pixels. This is represented as relative numbers for all three parameters for 100–500
cells. These are then converted into AFU (arbitrary fluorescence units) values representing the relative adduct level of a single
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PLOS ONE | https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0233739 May 21, 2020 2 / 3
Supporting information
S1 File. Powerpoint file showing the original Fig 11A (with error), updated Fig 11A, and
the Cy3, DAPI, and DAPI Cy3 overlay images used in the MOR CisR (4h) panel of the
updated Fig 11A.
(PPT)
S2 File. MOR cells 4h, 12h and 24h (Cy3, DAPI and overlay).
(ZIP)
S3 File. H460 cells 4h, 12h and 24h (Cy3, DAPI and overlay).
(ZIP)
S4 File. A549 cells 4h, 12h and 24h (Cy3, DAPI and overlay).
(ZIP)
S5 File. SKMES-1 cells 4h, 12h and 24h (Cy3, DAPI and overlay).
(ZIP)
S6 File. Quantitative data (Adduct Kinetics).
(XLSX)
Reference
1. Barr MP, Gray SG, Hoffmann AC, Hilger RA, Thomale J, O’Flaherty JD, et al. (2013) Generation and
Characterisation of Cisplatin-Resistant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Displaying a Stem-Like
Signature. PLoS ONE 8(1): e54193. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0054193 PMID: 23349823
nucleus. The graphics represented in Figure 11B show mean values of approximately 200 nuclei per time point ±95% confidence
intervals. In parallel with these analyses, cell images for all cell lines were acquired using Axioplan fluorescence microscopy.
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0233739.g001
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The graphics represented in Figure 11B show mean values of approximately 200 nuclei per time point ±95% confidence intervals. In parallel with these analyses, cell images for all cell lines were acquired using Axioplan fluorescence microscopy
nucleus. The graphics represented in Figure 11B show mean values of approximately 200 nuclei per time point ±95% confidence intervals. In parallel with these analyses, cell images for all cell lines were acquired using Axioplan fluorescence microscopy. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0233739.g001