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Conservación de la Nutria Gigante (Pteronura brasiliensis) en la reserva Bojonawi y río Orinoco (Vichada,COlombia)

Authors:
  • IBiCo - Instituto de Biología de la Conservación, Madrid, España

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Estado poblacional, ecología, actividades impactantes y estrategias de manejo para la especie Pteronura brasilensis en la reserva Bojonawi y aárea de influencia.
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The giant otter Pteronura brasiliensis , categorized as Endangered on the IUCN Red List, was once widely distributed throughout South America. By the middle of the 20th century the giant otter had become locally extinct along the main rivers of the Orinoco basin. Although some populations seem to have recovered, the paucity of information available does not permit a full evaluation of the species' conservation status. The objective of this study was to estimate the abundance and density of the giant otter population along the Orinoco river in the municipality of Puerto Carreño, Vichada, Colombia, where there is important commercial and recreational fishing. Thirty-nine linear km were surveyed, repeatedly, with a total of 315 km of surveys. Population size was estimated by direct counts of individuals. All individuals detected were photographed and identified individually from their throat pelage patterns. In total, 30 otters were identified, giving a minimum density of 0.77 individuals per km, one of the highest reported for the species in Colombia. Given the high density in this well-developed area, our results highlight the importance of this population for the conservation of the species.
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