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Abstract

This introduction reviews analysis of the dynamics of Technological Innovation Systems and introduces four papers that extend the analysis of dynamic processes in TIS. All four papers employ a system analysis for explaining TIS dynamics: Walrave & Raven and Markard consider the dynamics of the whole TIS. Musiolik et al. and Kieft et al. consider interventions intended to strengthen TIS dynamics. Overall, these papers show that the TIS framework can be extended to include an explicit consideration of how complex dynamic processes of a TIS generate system changes. Methods for the measurement of the TIS functions and empirical assessment of their interactions remain limited. The relationships of TIS functions to actor networks could be explored in greater depth. Research synthesizing insights into TIS dynamics across case studies is still limited.

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... Certainly, these modelling exercises represents the first quantitative approach to consider the whole complexity between TIS structure, functioning and context (Köhler et al. 2020). Using simulated data, they offer a concise understanding of emerging TIS that can be generalised to many research cases. ...
... Similar to the portfolio of methods, it is still unclear which measures and indicators to consider as variables and how they should be prioritised or benchmarked over time. Again, theoretical work is needed to postulate the direction of causal effects and feedback loops between functions and the indicators or measures applicable to capture them (Köhler et al. 2020, Weckowska et al. 2021). ...
Conference Paper
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Qualitative approaches have dominated the analysis of technological innovation systems (TIS). However, considering the limited generalizability and time-consuming nature of qualitative research, scholars suggested quantitative methods as a complement to derive more general explanations about the empirical dynamics of TIS. Nonetheless, quantitative TIS studies are equally criticized for their abstraction of micro-processes and narrow analytical focus, undermining their contribution to empirical research and theory-building. This study contributes to this emerging discussion by embarking on the first dedicated methodological review of quantitative approaches in empirical TIS research. The review comprises 18 dedicated methodological studies applying social network analysis, regression analysis, natural language processing, and system modelling to TIS. Besides describing the key features of these studies, this study suggests possible extensions to strengthen the contribution of the quantitative toolbox of methods in TIS analysis.
... The TIS literature provides a framework for understanding and steering transition processes through radical new technologies, in particular in the context of sustainable development [27,28]. Bergek et al. [25] (p. ...
... Recently, TIS researchers have been focusing more on how to conceptualize, measure, and intervene in a complex TIS that supports or blocks system changes in various temporal and spatial settings [28]. These studies particularly aim to understand how (patterns of) interactions between innovation functions (e.g., in terms of cumulative causation and motors of innovation) trigger complex TIS dynamics. ...
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... Finally, the technological innovation system (TIS) perspective combines many of these aspects and adjusts for some of the shortcomings that other systemic innovation heuristics reveal (J. Köhler, Raven, and Walrave 2020). The TIS focus rests on a single technology and on all features, actors, and interactions in the system that shape that technology's development (Hekkert and Negro 2009). ...
Conference Paper
Governments worldwide increasingly address challenges, such as climate change or sustainability transitions, through mission-oriented innovation policies, i.e. systemic policies that cut across sectors to target a societal problem. Achieving such missions requires socio-technical change and often results in so-called multi-technology innovations: technologies that comprise a set of complex, interacting sub-technologies of diverse characters and cater a multitude of socio-technical purposes. These innovations pose a challenge: They trigger coordination problems across policy domains, across government organisations with different interests, capacities, and mandates, as well as across policy design and implementation. However, although coordination problems are not new to public policy scholars, they remain largely unaddressed in the innovation policy context. Likewise, the innovation studies literature hardly considers the influence of public agencies in innovation systems. Combined, this merits the research question: How do public sector organisations and socio-technical innovation systems mutually shape each other, particularly in the context of mission-oriented policies? This thesis investigates the innovation systems of autonomous vehicles as an example of a multi-technology solution resulting from mission-oriented policies in three highly innovative economies: Singapore, Estonia, and Sweden. Relying on network analyses, semi-structured interviews, and process-tracing, it compares how hierarchical, market-based, and network-oriented policy coordination arrangements shape the public administration’s impact on the innovation system and vice-versa. In conclusion, socio-technical innovations, due to the challenges they trigger, shift policy coordination arrangements towards (intensified) network-oriented approaches. Accordingly, government organisations collaborate to enable the innovation system, rather than controlling it top-down or through market-based arrangements. ‘Networked transitions’, hence, allow systemic feedback loops to integrate policy design and implementation, to mitigate coordination failures, and to accelerate the system’s development towards fulfilling ‘the mission’.
... 3.) [23]. However, the effects of diverse contexts on TIS dynamics and the emergence of innovation systems remain understudied [24]. ...
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Chapter
The purpose of this chapter is to provide a review of the more general empirical findings of the vast number of TIS studies published so far. and, based on that, identify fruitful theoretical and empirical topics to explore in future research in this field. Most attention is given to studies using the functions approach. As part of the review, some conceptual clarifications with regard to the functions framework are also provided.
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