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Abstract

Objectives To examine associations between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and nutrition factors among Canadian-born and immigrant adults. Methods The sample included participants of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) (n = 27,211; 45–85 years) categorized by ethnicity (native white, native minority, immigrant white, and immigrant minority). PTSD was measured using the Primary Care PTSD tool. Nutrition factors included nutrition status indicators (anthropometrics, body fat %, handgrip strength, nutrition risk, sarcopenia, bone mineral density, and iron deficiency anemia) and dietary intakes (fiber, pulses and nuts, fat, omega-3 fatty acids, fruits and vegetables, fruit juice, calcium/vitamin D, salty snacks, pastries, and chocolate bars). Covariates included socioeconomic and health-related variables. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results Compared to white Canadians born in Canada, immigrant minority groups had a higher likelihood of PTSD (OR = 1.47, 95% CI 1.14–1.90, P < 0.001). Nutrition factors associated with PTSD included high nutrition risk (OR = 1.60, CI 1.41–1.80, P < 0.001), intakes of pulses and nuts (≥ one source; ORs 1.50–1.16, P's-< 0.05), pastries or chocolate (≥ 2/3 of a standard bar) (ORs = 1.35–1.37, P's < 0.05), and fiber (2–3 sources daily; OR = 0.83, CI 0.69–1.00, P < 0.05), as well as high waist-to-height ratio (OR = 0.91, CI 0.69–0.97, P < 0.05). Other factors included income (<C$100,000/yr; ORs 1.39–2.58, P's < 0.001), being widowed, divorced, or separated (OR = 1.35, CI 1.10–1.65, P < 0.05), having multiple chronic conditions (ORs = 1.76–3.34, P's < 0.001), experiencing chronic pain (OR = 1.64, P < 0.001), and smoking (OR = 1.22, P < 0.001). Conclusions Many nutrition-related factors contribute to PTSD in mid-age and older adults suggesting that targeted nutrition interventions within comprehensive programming will likely help prevent or manage PTSD. Funding Sources MITACS and Fulbright Canada.
18 Aging and Chronic Disease
Nutrition Factors Are Associated with Post-Traumatic Stress
Disorder in Immigrant and Canadian-Born Adults: Findings from
the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging
Karen Davison1,ChristinaHyland
2,Shen(Lamson)Lin
2,Hong-
mei Tong3,KarenM.Kobayashi
4,JoseG.Mora-Almanza
1,and
Esme Fuller-Thomson2
1Kwantlen Polytechnic University; 2University of Toronto;
3MacEwan University; and 4University of Victoria
Objectives: To examine associations between post-traumatic stress
disorder (PTSD) and nutrition factors among Canadian-born and
immigrant adults.
Methods: The sample included participants of the Canadian
Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) (n=27,211; 45–85 years)
categorized by ethnicity (native white, native minority, immigrant
white, and immigrant minority). PTSD was measured using the
Primary Care PTSD tool. Nutrition factors included nutrition status
indicators (anthropometrics, body fat %, handgrip strength, nutrition
risk, sarcopenia, bone mineral density, and iron deciency anemia) and
dietary intakes (ber, pulses and nuts, fat, omega-3 fatty acids, fruits
and vegetables, fruit juice, calcium/vitamin D, salty snacks, pastries, and
chocolate bars). Covariates included socioeconomic and health-related
variables. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted.
Results: Compared to white Canadians born in Canada, immigrant
minority groups had a higher likelihood of PTSD (OR =1.47,
95% CI 1.14–1.90, P<0.001). Nutrition factors associated with
PTSD included high nutrition risk (OR =1.60, CI 1.41–1.80,
P<0.001), intakes of pulses and nuts (one source; ORs 1.50–
1.16, P’s-<0.05), pastries or chocolate (2/3 of a standard bar)
(ORs =1.35–1.37, P’s <0.05), and ber (2–3 sources daily; OR =0.83,
CI 0.69–1.00, P<0.05), as well as high waist-to-height ratio
(OR =0.91, CI 0.69–0.97, P<0.05). Other factors included income
(<C$100,000/yr; ORs 1.39–2.58, P’s <0.001), being widowed, divorced,
or separated (OR =1.35, CI 1.10–1.65, P<0.05), having multiple
chronic conditions (ORs =1.76–3.34, P’s <0.001), experiencing
chronic pain (OR =1.64, P<0.001), and smoking (OR =1.22,
P<0.001).
Conclusions: Many nutrition-related factors contribute to PTSD in
mid-age and older adults suggesting that targeted nutrition interven-
tions within comprehensive programming will likely help prevent or
manage PTSD.
Funding Sources: MITACS and Fulbright Canada.
CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN NUTRITION
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