Chapter

Drawing Citizenship

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Abstract

This chapter offers a number of comic creation assignments. Creation is the highest level of Bloom’s revised taxonomy (Krathwohl, 2002). Students utilize the features of the comics medium, such as panel size and sequencing to name a few, to convey ideas related to citizenship in comic form.

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