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Comics and Hyperreality

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Abstract

The first chapter of the book serves as the introduction where various strands of thought are weaved together to show why the reading and creating of comics is a good fit for teaching citizenship in the present age. The first chapter forms the foundation and inspiration for all the activities in the later chapters.

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Chapter
Introduction In the educational arena, comics have crossed a route from absolute demonization to jubilant acceptance and actual creative uses. Today, comics are attracting the interest of the education community. More than ever, comics have been explored, analyzed, criticised, and consequently they have broaden their perspectives. Comics are not only about graphic art but also about literary art. Although there is some skepticism on whether or not comics are “true” literature, undoubtedly both literary and artistic characteristics of comics are in the core of this medium’s essence (Groensteen, 2006; Morgan 2003). In this paper, we will deal with the Doxiadis et al. (2009) graphic novel Logicomix. The purpose is to use Logicomix in the classroom, as a case study through which to teach some of the important theoretical concepts in literary studies. We will focus on biography as literary genre, and metafiction and intertextuality as literary techniques...........
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It has become an axiom in comic studies that "comics is a language, not a genre." But what exactly does that mean, and how is discourse on the form both aided and hindered by thinking of it in linguistic terms? In Comics and Language, Hannah Miodrag challenges many of the key assumptions about the "grammar" and formal characteristics of comics, and offers a more nuanced, theoretical framework that she argues will better serve the field by offering a consistent means for communicating critical theory in the scholarship. Through engaging close readings and an accessible use of theory, this book exposes the problems embedded in the ways critics have used ideas of language, literature, structuralism, and semiotics, and sets out a new and more theoretically sound way of understanding how comics communicate. Comics and Language argues against the critical tendency to flatten the distinctions between language and images and to discuss literature purely in terms of story content. It closely examines the original critical theories that such arguments purport to draw on and shows how they in fact point away from the conclusions they are commonly used to prove. The book improves the use the field makes of existing scholarly disciplines and furthers the ongoing sophistication of the field. It provides animated and insightful analyses of a range of different texts and takes an interdisciplinary approach. Comics and Language will appeal to the general comics reader and will prove crucial for specialized scholars in the fields of comics, literature, cultural studies, art history, and visual studies. It also provides a valuable summary of the current state of formalist criticism within comics studies and so presents the ideal text for those interested in exploring this growing area of research. © 2013 by University Press of Mississippi. All rights reserved.
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The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
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One of the most salient features of our culture is that there is so much bullshit. Everyone knows this. Each of us contributes his share. But we tend to take the situation for granted. Most people are rather confident of their ability to recognize bullshit and to avoid being taken in by it. So the phenomenon has not aroused much deliberate concern. We have no clear understanding of what bullshit is, why there is so much of it, or what functions it serves. And we lack a conscientiously developed appreciation of what it means to us. In other words, as Harry Frankfurt writes, "we have no theory." Frankfurt, one of the world's most influential moral philosophers, attempts to build such a theory here. With his characteristic combination of philosophical acuity, psychological insight, and wry humor, Frankfurt proceeds by exploring how bullshit and the related concept of humbug are distinct from lying. He argues that bullshitters misrepresent themselves to their audience not as liars do, that is, by deliberately making false claims about what is true. In fact, bullshit need not be untrue at all. Rather, bullshitters seek to convey a certain impression of themselves without being concerned about whether anything at all is true. They quietly change the rules governing their end of the conversation so that claims about truth and falsity are irrelevant. Frankfurt concludes that although bullshit can take many innocent forms, excessive indulgence in it can eventually undermine the practitioner's capacity to tell the truth in a way that lying does not. Liars at least acknowledge that it matters what is true. By virtue of this, Frankfurt writes, bullshit is a greater enemy of the truth than lies are.
Book
Contents: Preface Introduction Chapter 1: Superheroes for the Common Man: The Birth of the Comic Book Industry, 1933-1941 Chapter 2: Race, Politics, and Propaganda: Comic Books Go to War, 1939-1945 Chapter 3: Confronting Success: Comic Books and Postwar America, 1945-1956 Chapter 4: Youth Crisis: Comic Books and Controversy, 1947-1950 Chapter 5: Reds, Romance, and Renegades: Comic Books and the Culture of the Cold War, 1947-1954 Chapter 6: Turning Point: Comic Books in Crisis, 1954-1955 Chapter 7: Great Power and Great Responsibility: Superheroes in a Superpower, 1956-1967 Chapter 8: Questioning Authority: Comic Books and Cultural Change, 1968-1979 Chapter 9: Direct to the Fans: The Comic Book Industry since 1980 Epilogue: The Death of Superman or, Must There Be a Comic Book Industry? Spider-Man at Ground Zero: A 9-11 Postscript
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Graphic novels are stand-alone stories told in comic book format. In contrast to superhero comic books, graphic novels are more serious, often nonfiction, full-length, sequential art novels that explore the issues of race, social justice, global conflict, and war with intelligence and humor. The visual component of graphic novels supports text comprehension, making the stories accessible to readers at all levels. Graphic novels are extremely popular with teenagers, and using a few selections in the social studies classroom is an enjoyable way to stimulate critical conversations about their world. The author summarizes and suggests discussion questions for nine graphic novels that richly describe political and social conflicts in Bosnia, Palestine, Iran, Sudan, and Holocaust Germany.
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