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Reading Comics for Citizenship

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Abstract

This chapter offers assignments which center on reading comics. These assignments are meant to help students read comics in light of ideas and concepts related to citizenship and the social studies.

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Instructional Strategies for Middle and High School is an accessible, practical, and engaging methods textbook that introduces pre-service teachers to various instructional strategies and helps them to decide how and when to use these methods in the classroom. Classrooms are comprised of diverse learners, and aspiring teachers will face complex decisions about the assessment of student learning and classroom management. Instructional Strategies for Middle and High School equips pre-service teachers with the methodological tools to promote understanding, conceptual awareness, and learning for every child in the classroom. Features include: clear, step-by-step descriptions of seven instructional techniques that pre-service teachers can realistically implement within the classroom setting practical suggestions for ways to integrate effective classroom management and valid assessment techniques with each instructional strategy concrete examples to illustrate each concept or teaching method described guidelines for deciding which instructional methods are most appropriate to different classroom situations and for diverse learners guides for creating lesson plans access to a comprehensive companion website that provides additional resources and further ways to engage with the material presented in the chapters. http://www.routledge.com/textbooks/instructionalstrategies.
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This article examines the canonical texts of early Buddhism and canvasses recent scholarly literature to explore whether early Buddhism contains a political theory, and if so, what it is. The article concludes that the early texts do express a normative preference for enlightened monarchy as the best form of lay government. However, it also concludes that early Buddhism saw politics as being relatively unimportant among human concerns. Further, it argues that this theory of politics should be of interest to political theorists today due to three unusual elements: its deflationary estimate of the importance of politics, its denial of the existence of the self, and its naturalistic theory of ethics.
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Young adult literature (YAL) of the late 20th and early 21st century is exploring hybrid forms with growing regularity by embracing textual conventions from sequential art, video games, film, and more. As well, Web-based technologies have given those who consume YAL more immediate access to authors, their metacognitive creative processes, and their works or works-in-progress than ever before. This article examines the intersections among young adult texts, particularly graphic novels and Web comics, the Internet, and multiple literacies/types of reading to illustrate how embracing these trends can help educators teach about process and product when considering young adult texts.
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