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Abstract

Next‐generation cloud data centers are based on software‐defined data center infrastructures that promote flexibility, automation, optimization, and scalability. The Redfish standard and the Intel Rack Scale Design technology enable software‐defined infrastructure and disaggregate bare‐metal compute, storage, and networking resources into virtual pools to dynamically compose resources and create virtual performance‐optimized data centers (vPODs) tailored to workload‐specific demands. This article proposes four chassis design configurations based on Distributed Management Task Force's Redfish industry standard applied to compose vPOD systems, namely, a fully shared design, partially shared homogeneous design, partially shared heterogeneous design, and not shared design; their main difference is based on the used hardware disaggregation level. Furthermore, we propose models that combine reliability block diagram and stochastic Petri net modeling approaches to represent the complexity of the relationship between the pool of disaggregated hardware resources and their power and cooling sources in a vPOD. These four proposed design configurations were analyzed and compared in terms of availability and component's sensitivity indexes by scaling their configurations considering different data center infrastructure. From the obtained results, we can state that, in general, when one increases the hardware disaggregation, availability is improved. However, after a given point, the availability level of the fully shared, partially shared homogeneous, and partially shared heterogeneous configurations remain almost equal, while the not shared configuration is still able to improve its availability.

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... 2. Failover, which is responsible for moving resource groups to a secondary node. Depending on the failure type, a supporting utilities such as UPS, power distribution unit (PDU) [48], cloud operating systems [49], and backup infrastructure redundancy by multiple sites, and redundant data centre equipment, such as UPS and fault tolerance for components, HA for the individual data centre components [29,50] no ...
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... In this section, a dynamic method for modeling cloud infrastructure 11,43,44,45 is presented. The presented method applies an algorithm to use a hierarchical modeling approach proposed in Section 4.1. ...
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Solutions for intel rack scale design standards
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