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Do School Ownership and Incentive Mechanisms Affect Learning Outcomes? An Analysis from Rural India

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Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of enrollment in a private school and incentive mechanisms on the learning outcome (writing skills) in rural India. It adds to the extant research by adopting an instrumental variables approach. The findings reveal a significantly higher likelihood of superior learning outcomes for students studying in private schools and the no positive spill-over effect of incentives to enroll in government schools on the learning outcomes of their students. The empirical investigation addresses the issue of endogeneity using instrumental variables and control for district location, household- and individual-level factors. The findings are insightful for improving the learning outcomes of children in rural India.

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