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Investigating policy and implementation of English-medium instruction in higher education institutions in China: A report by EMI Oxford Research Group in collaboration with the British Council in China

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Abstract

The internationalisation of Chinese higher education (HE) has accelerated at a rapid pace over the past two decades, spurred by numerous government initiatives. At present, there is a pressing need for an investigation into English medium instruction (EMI) implementation across Chinese universities. In response, this report aims to take stock of the current state of EMI policy implementation in Chinese HE to better understand EMI provision and to inform future EMI growth. It explores multiple levels of policy implementation, alongside an investigation of implementation affordances and challenges. See report here: https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/sites/teacheng/files/K155_Investigating_policy_implementation_EMI_China_web.pdf
Investigating*policy*and*implementation*
of*English-medium*instruction*in*higher*
education*institutions*in*China*
Heath&Rose,&Jim&McKinley,&Xin&Xu,&Sihan&Zhou&
For full open-access report go to:
https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/sites/teacheng/files/K155_Inves
tigating_policy_implementation_EMI_China_web.pdf
... Moreover, the use of English as a medium to impart knowledge in HE is perceived as a key element for internationalizing Chinese HE. In a review article, Rose et al. (2020) identified and documented some prominent discourse that underpinned the formulation of institutional policy regarding EMI. The policy consists of several motivating factors including cultivating student talents, responding to globalization and promoting internationalization, improving the quality of teaching and curricula, all of which inspired the establishment of EMI in HEIs. ...
... There have been multiple models developed for EMI policy implementation in China (Rose et al., 2020). For example, to maintain and consolidate the operation of English, EMI was mandated for 5-10% of the undergraduate courses in 2001, documented in the 2001 policy directives titled 'Opinions on strengthening undergraduate teaching work in HE and improving teaching quality' that intended to spur global competitiveness among local talents (Dang et al., 2021;Macaro et al., 2018). ...
... After that, EMI programs experienced a rapid growth in Chinese HE. By 2006, 132 out of 136 universities in mainland China had programmed EMI courses (Rose et al., 2020). For succeeding EMI programs, the Ministry of Education (MoE), China administered 'Outline of national medium and long-term education reform and development plan [2010][2011][2012][2013][2014][2015][2016][2017][2018][2019][2020]' that further underscored the necessity to ingrain internationalization of HE by introducing and increasing EMI courses (Ministry of Education, as cited in Dang et al., 2021). ...
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