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Bath Erhebungsinstrument der Subjektiven Lebensqualität bei Demenz (BASQID) Benutzerhandbuch für die deutschsprachige Version 1.0: Anleitung für Nutzerinnen und Nutzer sowie Eigenschaften des Instruments

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Abstract

Zusammenfassung Das BASQID ist ein Instrument zur Erfassung von Lebensqualität. Es wurde für den Einsatz bei Menschen mit leichter bis mittelschwerer Demenz, entsprechend dem Mini-Mental-Status-Test (MMST) [1] mit einer Punktzahl von zwölf oder mehr, entwickelt und validiert. Das BASQID wird in Interviewform erhoben, wobei der oder die Interviewende dem Menschen mit Demenz jede Frage visuell und mündlich präsentiert. Diese Datei umfasst das Benutzerhandbuch für die deutschsprachige BASQID Version 1.0 inklusive der Instruktionen für die Interviewenden und einer Zusammenfassung der Eigenschaften des BASQID. Dateien mit dem Auswertungsbogen und Vorlagen für die Fragen- und Antwortkarten sind ebenfalls erhältlich und befinden sich für die deutschsprachige Version im Anhang. Für die englischsprachige Originalversion sind die Dateien über den folgenden Link erhältlich: https://www.rice.org.uk/basqid
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