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Psicometría aplicada. Guía para el análisis de datos y escalas con jamovi

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... The value of Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO = 0.863) and Bartlett's test (Bartlett's statistic (435) = 5597.2; p < 0.001) obtained indicated that the correlation matrix was adequate for the factor analysis [24]. The exploratory factor analysis classified the items in two subscales: 1) compassion satisfaction (CS), and 2) compassion fatigue (CF). ...
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A must-have resource for researchers, practitioners, and advanced students interested or involved in psychometric testing. Over the past hundred years, psychometric testing has proved to be a valuable tool for measuring personality, mental ability, attitudes, and much more. The word 'psychometrics' can be translated as 'mental measurement'; however, the implication that psychometrics as a field is confined to psychology is highly misleading. Scientists and practitioners from virtually every conceivable discipline now use and analyze data collected from questionnaires, scales, and tests developed from psychometric principles, and the field is vibrant with new and useful methods and approaches. This handbook brings together contributions from leading psychometricians in a diverse array of fields around the globe. Each provides accessible and practical information about their specialist area in a three-step format covering historical and standard approaches, innovative issues and techniques, and practical guidance on how to apply the methods discussed. Throughout, real-world examples help to illustrate and clarify key aspects of the topics covered. The aim is to fill a gap for information about psychometric testing that is neither too basic nor too technical and specialized, and will enable researchers, practitioners, and graduate students to expand their knowledge and skills in the area. Provides comprehensive coverage of the field of psychometric testing, from designing a test through writing items to constructing and evaluating scales. Takes a practical approach, addressing real issues faced by practitioners and researchers. Provides basic and accessible mathematical and statistical foundations of all psychometric techniques discussed. Provides example software code to help readers implement the analyses discussed.