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A Formula for the Start of a New Sunspot Cycle

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It is known that the solar radio flux is strongly correlated to the sunspot cycle and that the flux is nearly the same at every minimum. If 64 sfu is taken as the baseline for all cycles, then we can calculate the proxy sunspot number from the flux, and vice versa. Furthermore, we find that the fitted adjusted flux divided by the fitted sunspot number gives a strong marker for the start of Solar Cycle 25 in October 2019. The high resolution 2K (based on 2048x2048 pixels SDO images) sunspot number currently indicates a start in June 2019.
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