Experiment Findings

Comparison of Mechanical Characteristics of Commonly Used Vaginal Packing Materials

Authors:
  • Marchand Institute for Minimally Invasive Surgery
  • Marchand OB/GYN
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Abstract

Introduction: Clinically, vaginal packing provides the benefit of hemostasis and is designed to prevent the formation of postoperative hematomas. Despite the common use of vaginal packing in pelvic surgery, there is limited data to indicate which material has the ideal characteristics for vaginal packing. Materials and Methods: Three packing materials were used: DeRoyal ® Fluftex ™ (DeRoyal Industries, Inc., Powell, Tennessee), NHP Surgi-Pak ™ vaginal packing (NHP Industries, Inc., City of Industry, California), and Curad ® Plain Packing Strips (Medline Industries, Inc., Northfield, Illinois). A fluid with similar viscosity to human blood, defibrinated sheep's blood (Remel Laboratories, Nenexa Kansas) was used to saturate the materials. The primary outcome was the amount of fluid absorbance of each product in both the handpacked and unpacked state. The number of drops used to saturate each material were counted and converted to mL/g. Each product was tested three times and the results were measured by counting the number of drops needed to saturate the material in each experiment. Experiment: Three materials were obtained and conducted into two different experiments to test absorbance.

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