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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment: PROFESSIONAL USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY - BASED SOLUTIONS FOR SOCIAL INTEGRATION

Authors:

Abstract

The publication contains the first report of the Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment - Exchange of Good Practices, ERASMUS+ project number 2019-1-PL01-KA204- 065689. The first report presents a desk research about “PROFESSIONAL USE OF ICT- BASED SOLUTIONS FOR SOCIAL INTEGRATION” carried out by ASIDE consortium and contains: Introduction Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration: The Polish case Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration: The Czech Republic case Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration: The Spanish case Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration: The Turkish case Conclusion: How to use ICT for social integration
Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment
Exchange of Good Practices
2019-1-PL01-KA204- 065689
PROFESSIONAL USE OF INFORMATION
AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY
- BASED SOLUTIONS FOR SOCIAL
INTEGRATION
November 2019
February 2020
REPORT I
__________________________________________________________________________
Project information
Project: Erasmus+
Project title: Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment
Acronym: ASIDE
Project No.: 2019-1-PL01-KA204- 065689
Project coordinator: Research and Innovation in Education Institute, [INBIE], Poland
Project partners:
The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents
which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made
of the information contained therein.
Content
PROFESSIONAL USE OF ICT- BASED SOLUTIONS FOR SOCIAL INTEGRATION............................. 4
Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 4
1. Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration: The Polish case
[Responsible: Renata Ochoa-Daderska, Agnieszka Chęcińska-Kopiec, Luis Ochoa
Siguencia, INBIE] ............................................................................................................. 5
2. Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration: The Czech Republic
case [Responsible: Emil VELINOV - ITC International] ................................................... 7
3. Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration: The Spanish case
[Responsible: Javier SANCHEZ GARCIA - EuroFUE-UJI] .................................................. 9
4. Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration: The Turkish case
[Responsible: Yeliz NUR AKARÇAY, Saricam Halk Egitimi Merkezi].............................. 14
5. Conclusion: How to use ICT for social integration ........................................................ 18
Bibliography .............................................................................................................................. 19
List of authors ........................................................................................................................... 20
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
PROFESSIONAL USE OF ICT- BASED SOLUTIONS FOR SOCIAL
INTEGRATION
Responsible: Instytut Badań i Innowacji w Edukacji - INBIE
Introduction
In the era of ubiquitous modern information and communication technologies (ICT), these
tools and methods cannot be missing in the process of adult education. Modern adult
education is moving away from teaching encyclopaedism in favour of combining traditional
lecture methods with the use of Information and Communication Technology, with active
group work methods, workshops, trainings and moderation methods.
Modern adult education is one in which the educator does not have the "one right" role and
the only effective method of education. In return, as a trainer, facilitator or moderator, he/she
uses the personal interests, experience and internal motivation of adults to learn. By creating
a positive and supportive learning environment, it motivates an adult student to learn
independently, inspires and strengthens learning processes. The learner, thanks to such
activities of the educator, independently manages the process of learning and development,
strengthens self-esteem, and therefore self-esteem
1
.
Adult education in the 21st century faces many new challenges that result from the growing
possibilities of using and integrating ICT in every aspect of both professional and personal
life. The great potential lies in the development of ICT integration in the professional
environment and the activation of professional life and adult education.
An important and key element of adult education is strengthening education to adapt it to
local conditions with the possibility of global use and modelling effective practices. In the
digital age, the competences of adult educators in the field of ICT enjoy great research interest
because adult educators play a key role in promoting the use of ICT by adults in a variety of
situations.
The aim of the study is to consider, based on literature and four case studies, the use and
assessment of practices using ICT in Poland as a lever for educational change and innovation.
With each case study, we include suggestions for more effective linking research and practice
based on international analyses carried out covering the following countries: Poland, Spain,
The Czech Republic and Turkey.
Luis Ochoa Siguencia
1
Mikołajczyk Katarzyna, „Nowe trendy w kształceniu dorosłych”, Ośrodek Rozwoju Edukacji maj 2019,
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/333339666_Katarzyna_Mikolajczyk_Nowe_trendy_w_ksztalceniu_d
oroslych Accessed 13.01.2020
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
1. Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration:
The Polish case [Responsible: Renata Ochoa-Daderska, Agnieszka
Chęcińska-Kopiec, Luis Ochoa Siguencia, INBIE]
Adult education in the area of ICT and new technologies brings several challenges, especially
relevant to seniors. For the broader context of the selection of the age group of seniors, it is
worth considering, in addition to age, additional social and economic elements, such as place
of residence, education or purchasing power, which may affect the real needs of this group; it
is worth, if possible, reaching for e.g. psychographic aspects to build a more complete picture
of the senior based on the way of spending free time, interests, personality type or even more
detailed aspects such as attitude to technical innovations.
Thanks to these elements, it is possible to more accurately distinguish subgroups and better
identify the needs of seniors in order to more accurately adjust both the educational offer and
the strategy of using the opportunities that the contemporary market of digital products and
services brings (both 60-year-olds and people in their nineties participated in the activities).
Efficiency in searching for effective solutions increases thanks to participatory design (co-
design). It is particularly important when designing services and products based on new
technologies, addressed to seniors. The second important issue is the intergenerational aspect
and the related breaking of intergroup and generational stereotypes. In this context, one
should also remember about the other side of interaction, i.e. young people.
These include a variety of people from volunteers skilled in ICT to entrepreneurs,
programmers and designers creating digital solutions. They often see the potential inherent in
the silver economy, but equally often they are victims of stereotypical thinking about seniors
by offering them services that they believe are needed by seniors.
For example, in one of the research activities a group of young programmers and designers
emerged who had difficulty seeing more than just the end customer in the senior group; these
teams have prepared cliché solutions based on stereotypical thinking about seniors and their
needs. On the other hand, some young teams were able to break through and apply an open
enough approach to see the elderly as a potential partner that allows them to better penetrate
into the essence of real problems that the target group is facing.
Thanks to joint action not only the inter-group stereotypes were broken, but real needs were
discovered and better solutions were proposed. The intergenerational participatory approach
enables direct interaction between solution developers and potential recipients, providing
benefits to both parties.
Thanks to the unconventional approach, seniors have completely new possibilities of contact
with the latest technologies, which go far beyond standard forms of adult education
dominating in relation to seniors. For example, seniors have repeatedly participated in tasks
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
related to the co-creation of new ICT solutions, from developing the content of courses,
through co-creating mobile applications with young programmers to applying the latest trends
such as virtual and augmented reality (VR, AR) and voice assistants (VA).
In conclusion, Living Lab's activity is an example of unconventional educational activities for
seniors, based on an active participatory approach to new technologies and the silver
economy. Remember to consider seniors not only as recipients, but also as potential partners
who can contribute to the solution.
On the other hand, this approach requires the inclusion of young /adult entrepreneurs,
designers and programmers, or even volunteers as young enthusiasts of new technologies,
who also need support to more widely use the potential of seniors. Such a comprehensive
approach can effectively overcome inter-group stereotypes by referring to specific desires,
needs and aspirations that this target group has, just like other age groups
2
.
Picture 1: EPALE, Adult learning EU, Jul 20, 2015
[https://twitter.com/epale_eu/status/623151647984893952]
2
Kopeć Wiesław, NOWE FORMY WSPARCIA I EDUKACJI ICT SENIORÓW. 01.07.2019,
https://kometa.edu.pl/artykuly/228,nowe-formy-wsparcia-i-edukacji-ict-seniorow Accessed 13.01.2020
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
2. Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration:
The Czech Republic case [Responsible: Emil VELINOV - ITC
International]
The Ministry of Education in the Czech Republic did not set and standardize the key skills of
pupils in the field of information and communication technologies (ICT) even after five years
from the approval of the digital education strategy. This follows from a review of the
Supreme Audit Office (SAO), which examined measures and projects that were to support the
development of digitalization of education at primary and secondary schools in 20112018.
The Ministry has made number of steps have been taken in the area of the Digital Education
Strategy up to 2019. For example, Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic created a
framework of digital competences of teachers, where it plans to intensively support teacher
education in the area of digital technologies. A number of tutorials and workshops have been
created for school ICT coordinators and the modernization of the ICT education area for the
period 2015-2019. Accordingly, International Training Centre (ITC)-Prague has put lots of
efforts to develop ICT courses in its portfolio for the last 4-5 years. ITC is adult education
institution for in-service teacher training, established by the Czech Ministry of Education and
listed in the school registry.
ITC is active on the adult education market from 1996 and has a seventeen years long
experience in the education field with specialization on the innovative teaching methods for
teachers and education specialist from whole EU.
ITC is a modern and dynamic company with a long tradition and professional organizational
background. The mission of ITC is to provide good quality language education together with
other courses in various fields. Our main goal is to provide complex services on a professional
level ensuring our clients’ satisfaction.
At the moment the training centre provides the following trainings to teachers, students,
seniors and minority groups as follows: Going Digital, Using Tablets in the Class, ICT for
Education, Social Media and Entrepreneurship, Agile Project Management, STEM, Virtual
Reality and Human Resource Management and Digitalization. ICT aims at the following
milestones:
define a basic competences portfolio specifically targeted for social inclusion
create comprehensive list of topics and practices essential for digital social inclusion
initiatives/activities
to create a network active in digital social inclusion
improve competencies in digital social inclusion of social educators and volunteers
improve social inclusions through digital innovation practices, innovative ICT based
methods and pedagogies, online participatory models
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
ITC sheds a light on developing digital skills and competencies among teachers, principals
and educators, who are possessing different professional background and their ages differ
quite a lot. There is certain percentage of third age people, who attend ITC trainings and
courses in order to keep intact with the current ICT development and in order to stay in the
professional circle of educators, who are fully aware of basic ICT enhancement on the job.
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
3. Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration:
The Spanish case [Responsible: Javier SANCHEZ GARCIA - EuroFUE-
UJI]
Digital Agenda for Spain
On February 15, 2013, the Council of Ministers approved the Digital Agenda for Spain as the
Government's strategy to develop the digital economy and society. This strategy was
configured as the umbrella for all the Government's actions in the area of
Telecommunications and the Information Society. The Agenda was jointly led by the Ministry
of Energy, Tourism and the Digital Agenda and by the Ministry of Finance and Public
Function.
The Agenda set out the roadmap for Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and
e-Government to meet the objectives of the Digital Agenda for Europe in 2015 and 2020, and
incorporated specific objectives for the development of the digital economy and society in
Spain.
To this end, the Digital Agenda for Spain was designed as an agile instrument that, in addition
to addressing these objectives, could be adapted to the rapid technological development that
characterises the ICT sector.
Objectives
Initially the Digital Agenda for Spain contained 106 lines of action structured around six
major objectives:
1. To promote the deployment of networks and services to guarantee digital connectivity.
2. Develop the digital economy for the growth, competitiveness and internationalisation
of Spanish companies.
3. Improve e-government and digital public services.
4. Strengthen confidence in the digital environment.
5. Promote R&D&I in the industries of the future.
6. Promote inclusion and digital literacy and the training of new ICT professionals.
This sixth objective try to achieve an inclusive Information Society in which citizens and
professionals are well prepared to reap the benefits of intensive use of ICTs. To this end, the
Agenda proposes two fundamental areas of work: promoting inclusion and digital literacy and
adapting training systems for digital training and the training of new ICT professionals.
An advanced digital society requires that many of its citizens have regular access to the
Internet and benefit from the opportunities it provides. To this end, the Digital Agenda for
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
Spain establishes the development of a Digital Inclusion and Employability Plan through
public-private collaboration and with the participation of civil society.
Spanish plans made in ICT and Information Society
Overview of digital inclusion and employability plans in Spain
The Digital Agenda for Spain establishes the elaboration of Digital Inclusion and
Employability Plans that integrate the largest possible number of agents, serve as an umbrella
for their initiatives, join forces and multiply the effect of the measures adopted. These Plans
are the result of the contributions of multiple actors, public and private, who have joined
forces in the common objective of improving the quality of life of citizens and improving the
competitiveness and positioning of SMEs using ICTs.
Structure of the plans
Axis I: Accessibility
The first axis of the Plans focuses on providing the population in general and certain
disadvantaged groups with access to the use of the Internet and ICT tools to reduce the risk of
digital exclusion.
Axis II: Literacy
The second axis works on the objective of equipping the population with basic digital skills to
offer them a better quality of life, especially for older, less qualified people and those other
social groups that are reluctant to use ICT.
Axis III: Equality
The third axis focuses on reducing the gender gap in the use of and access to new information
technologies. The measures included are directly related to the Actions to promote the
Equality of Women and Men in the Information Society.
Axis IV: Employability
The fourth axis is aimed at improving on-the-job training for new ICT professionals and
professionals from other sectors. It also articulates measures to encourage entrepreneurs,
SMEs and self-employed for the development of new businesses in priority ICT lines and
training in skills for entrepreneurship.
The implementation of the Digital Agenda for Spain has been articulated through the
following specific plans that developed the six objectives of the Digital Agenda for Spain:
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
1. Plan for telecommunications and ultra-fast networks to promote efficient investment in
ultra-fast networks and establish the bases for achieving the European broadband
objectives for 2020.
2. ICT plan in SMEs and e-business to use ICTs to improve SMEs' productivity and
competitiveness and to achieve European e-business targets.
3. Plan to boost the digital economy and digital content to realise the growth potential of
the digital content industry for the digital economy.
4. Plan for the internationalisation of technology companies to increase the visibility and
international presence of Spanish technology-based companies.
5. Plan for confidence in the digital environment to establish a climate of confidence in the
digital environment so that ICTs contribute to the economic and social development of
the country.
6. Plan for development and innovation in the ICT sector to take advantage of the potential
for growth and employment generation in industries of the future.
7. Plan for digital inclusion and employability to ensure that the majority of the population
uses the Internet and to achieve the European objectives of digital inclusion in order to
minimise the digital divide.
8. Digital public services plan to continue promoting the digitalisation of public services to
achieve greater efficiency and structure.
9. National Smart Cities Plan to promote the Smart Cities technology industry in Spain
and to help local entities in the transformation processes towards Smart Cities and
Smart Destinations.
10. Plan to promote Language Technologies to foster the development of natural language
processing and automatic translation in Spanish and co-official languages.
11. National Plan for intelligent territories that is developed based on the experiences and
results derived from the implementation of the National Plan for Intelligent Cities and
the consultation carried out with the different agents in the sector.
To analyse the results of these plans, the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Digital
Transformation of Spain has prepared a report of Outstanding Indicators of the Digital
Economy and Society, with the latest data available (2019), which shows the evolution of the
main indicators on ICT use in Households and Companies in Spain (digital inclusion in
Spain).
The report focuses on two topics: the equipment and use of ICT in households and the use of
ICT and e-commerce in companies, both published by the National Institute of Statistics
(INE). As the results are of great interest both topics are shown.
Firstly, it analyses the indicators related to households.
In 2019, household access to a broadband connection exceeded 90%, 5.1 percentage points
higher than in 2018. On the opposite side, households without an Internet connection cited
lack of need and low awareness as the main reasons (75.5 and 51.3 per cent respectively). The
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
growth in the percentage of households using mobile telephony continues in 2019 with 98.5
%.
In terms of Internet use, the percentage of users who regularly use the Internet continues to
rise with 87.7%, increasing by 5 percentage points compared to 2018. Regarding the devices
used to connect to the Internet, it observes that women make greater use of mobile devices
than men, while men use laptops, tablets and consoles to a greater extent than women. The
specific purposes for which the Internet is used include: sending and receiving e-mail
(72.2%); reading or downloading newspapers (71.1%); listening to music (62.5%); making
video calls (55.1%) and Internet banking (54.9%).
About software skills, there is an increase with respect to 2017 in the percentage of
individuals who have basic or above basic software skills, both in women and men, reaching
57.9 % in women and 60.7 % in men.
Looking at e-commerce, the percentage of people who have bought over the Internet in the
last month was 33.2%. Most individuals spent their purchases on holiday accommodation
(56.1%), sports equipment (55.7%) and tickets for shows (49.2%).
With all this, the degree of confidence in the Internet for this year is considerably higher than
in 2018, with 67.6% of individuals stating that they have a lot or a fair amount of confidence
in the Internet, increasing by almost 9 percentage points compared to the previous year.
Finally, it should be noted that among children aged 10-15, the use of both the computer and
the Internet is very high, with 89.7% and 92.9% of children using the computer and the
Internet respectively. By sex, we observe that girls use new technologies to a greater extent.
For this year, the percentage of girls who have a mobile phone is 67.1 % compared to 65 % of
boys.
Secondly, indicators related to ICT use and e-commerce in enterprises are analysed.
The main form of business Internet access is broadband (fixed or mobile). Most businesses
(43.1%) access with speeds equal to or greater than 100 Mbps.
Half of the enterprises use social media. Of these, 95% use social networks (Facebook,
LinkedIn, Google+, etc) in 95% of cases, half (47%) use websites that share multimedia
content (Youtube, Flickr, etc), and 38% use company blogs or microblogs.
Regarding security, the growing trend in the use of internal security systems continues, with
92.8% of companies having some kind of security system. The main types of internal security
used are: up-to-date software (87.4%); data backup in a separate location (83.6%) and strong
password authentication (70.6%).
Regarding electronic signatures, 80.6% of enterprises with Internet access use digital
signatures, almost 4 percentage points more than in the previous year. The main reason for the
use of signatures is to interact with the public administration (99.3%).
In relation to e-commerce, the percentage of businesses selling over the Internet continues to
grow, reaching 33.9%, compared to 32% in 2018.
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
Finally, with regard to the use of advanced services, 8.31% of companies declared that they
had carried out big data analyses in 2019 and 28% had purchased some cloud computing
service.
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
4. Professional use of ICT- based solutions for social integration:
The Turkish case [Responsible: Yeliz NUR AKARÇAY, Saricam Halk
Egitimi Merkezi]
Technology literacy is the ability to use technology effectively to access, evaluate, integrate,
create and communicate information to improve the learning process through problem solving
and critical thinking. Technology literacy helps a person to communicate, solve problems, and
develop lifelong learning skills to advance.
It can be seen that technology literacy is mainly related to the individual's technology ability
and skills. Emphasis on ability and skill dimension is in line with the studies carried out by
the European Union. Accordingly, technology literacy is defined by the European Union as
the necessary qualifications to achieve digital competence and to use information and
communication technologies safely and critically in business, daily life, learning and
communication with individuals. This 'digital competence' is one of the eight key
qualifications defined in the European Parliament and the European Union Council's Basic
Competences for Lifelong Learning advice, which European citizens must develop in a
community structure surrounded by information and communication technologies. It is stated
these qualifications including digital competence are necessary for the individuals to realize
and develop themselves, to participate in society as an active citizen and to provide
employment. On the other hand, it is widely accepted by the United Nations that technology-
related digital skills can help improve social inclusion, similar to the European Union's
emphasis on participation in life.
While social, cultural, economic and political developments cause individuals and social
needs to change constantly, the content of the literacy phenomenon created socially in the
context of cultural practices also changes in the context of different needs. Literacy appears to
be related to the concept of technology, especially after the latest developments in the field of
information and communication technologies. Technology in every area of daily life greatly
affects the way individuals live and work. In the new order, where information and
communication technologies are decesive, it is important for individuals with different social,
cultural or economic backgrounds to adapt to their new life and environment surrounded by
technology. In order for them to exist as individuals in the society and take advantage of the
opportunities provided by technology, it is inevitable for them to develop their competences
in technology and to become technology literate.
This research aims to find the basic level of technology literacy and technology use case in
Turkey. For this purpose, answers were sought to the question of the acquisition and use of
computer and internet technology which can be seen as the basis of information and
communication technologies among individuals in our country.
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
According to the results of the research, although there are high usage rates in some
evaluation parameters, computer and internet usage rate among individuals are not sufficient
yet. Compared to other segments of the society, it is observed that individuals who are already
socially, culturally and economically disadvantaged, such as women, elderly, people with low
education level or who are not in the labour force, still use computer and internet technologies
to a limited extent. Therefore, due to the insufficient use of technology, the sector in question
cannot take advantage of the possibilities available in a wide area where technology is used
today. However, the social, cultural and economic development of individuals is taking place
in a technology-related manner and it is accepted as a prerequisite that technology can be used
in many areas. Therefore, not only the technology dimension, but the differentiation in all
areas of life is growing, which creates a deeper gap among individuals every day.
On the other hand, a more hopeless finding is encountered when the results of the research are
evaluated in terms of problem-solving skills in technology intensive environments. According
to the results, individuals between the ages of 16 and 65 appear to have the lowest level of
competences in terms of problem-solving skills in technology-intensive environments (only
0.9% of individuals are included in the upper-level skill class). Turkey received far behind the
OECD average scores in each rating level. Accordingly, it is not possible to talk about a
technology literacy, which is commonly defined in the literature, as an individual who is
aware of the technology, acquires the ability to use technology and develops critical thinking.
The factors affecting digital competence performance of adult people in Turkey:
Formal education background of adult people: Information Technologies and Software
Courses were removed from the list of elective courses and included among compulsory
courses in 2012. When the adult people are evaluated in terms of age, it is possible to say that
most of them did not receive any training on computer skills in formal education since there
was no information and communication technologies course among compulsory courses. Not
having basic computer skills in formal education affects the use of technology negatively.
However, some of the adult people use information technologies in their daily and work lives
with mobile or computer-based tools. However, they may not have received any training for
this use. So, it is possible to say that the use of technology is learned by trying especially in
business life.
Social Prejudices: There are some social barriers like prejudices or dogmas preventing
people from connecting to the internet in terms of digital competences. The wrong belief that
the Internet will teach some wrong behaviours, even if the internet was not used in the formal
education period, not using it afterwards can negatively affect the acquisition and updating of
skills.
Bias against using technological tools: Especially senior adults may be hesitant about using
technological devices. Today, the internet is seen as the shortest way to access information.
However, the limited use of information and communication technologies by adults can lead
to the lack of access to up-to-date information and this situation can affect the ability to use
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
technological tools which is seen as the fastest way to access information. In addition, online
fraud situations cause adults to be cautious about performing certain transactions with
technological tools.
In our country, it is seen that people's perception of old age is earlier than Europe. In countries
like Germany, while people in their fifties are trying to find a second or third job to stay in the
labour force or to be active, the fact that people of the same age group in our country identify
themselves as elderly also affects learning. Studies in the literature have proved that today's
adults who have not been exposed to information technologies since the day they were born
experience difficulties in adapting to this new world from time to time, but this adaptation
was easy for the generation Y who was born between 1980-2000 and has witnessed the
development of technology since childhood.
Psychological barriers:
The belief that learning will slow down as you get older or that it will not be learned after a
while and lack of motivation and self-confidence preventing acquiring new skills are serious
psychological barriers in the use and learning of digital skills.
In addition to the external factors affecting the educational environment, people's hesitant
approach towards the use of technology due to their own habits, lack of self-confidence, fears,
and the fact that lifelong learning could not be internalized emerged as another dimension of
the table. Not having basic skills cause some problems such as not being able to make certain
inferences, not establishing a relationship between events, and not being able to access
information in a world where the information required by daily life is rapidly transferred to
the digital environment.
In addition to the traditional definition and meaning of literacy, technology literacy can be
seen as a tool for inclusion in society, taking into account the emphasis made by international
institutions and organizations such as the European Union or the United Nations. In addition
to the inclusion of technology related to this phenomenon and the expansion of the concept
content, the natural consequence of the individual's self-actualization will depend on her/his
ability to use technology today. For this reason, reaching information and communication
technologies in our country, obtaining these technologies, integrating them into life as needed
and being a technology literate are considered valuable for all disadvantaged people in the
society such as the elderly, the disabled, women and individuals with economic or educational
barriers. These people should be included in life socially, culturally and economically without
any discrimination.
Given that young people grew up in a technology-intensive world, they can easily adapt to
changes in technology and use computers and the Internet as an essential part of information
and communication technologies, so it is extremely important to ensure that adults are
technology literate. Before the disadvantages, divisions and gaps arising from the current
conditions reach larger dimensions in our country, it is also of great importance to increase
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
the technology competences of adults, to evaluate regularly the relationship between
technology and technology use, and to implement policies to ensure technology literacy
depending on the results obtained. There is a distinction between people who have and use
information technology and those who do not have or cannot use that technology. This
division can be the biggest obstacle to the development of political and social equality and
democratic society among individuals.
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Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
5. Conclusion: How to use ICT for social integration
Adult education in the 21st century faces many new challenges that result from the growing
possibilities of using and integrating ICT in every aspect of both professional and personal
life. The great potential lies in the development of ICT integration in the professional
environment and the activation of professional life and adult education
Researchers from different countries and backgrounds give some answers on ResearchGate
to this important question.
Technology has begun to impose itself in all aspects of life, one of the most important of these
is the social aspect. [Yousif Yaqoob Yousif, Department of Educational Sciences
psychological, University of Baghdad]
Earlier the teacher had his or her students within reach for oral communication in a
classroom. The students did not normally interact with other than teacher and peers during
class time. That is what for the teacher appeared as his or her class to teach, the learners
within reach, which he used for constructing collaboration in best cases. The social qualities
of interaction varied a lot - we seem to only remember the nice and ideal parts when
comparing to ICT-enabled learning communication.
Today the friction of information is very low indeed, it flows through classroom walls without
problems. But it creates problems for the teacher that want absolute attention. But in some
cases, the teacher may not deserve this absolute attention - and students do their facebooking,
listen to other teachers on the same subject on youtube or communicate with students or
experts in another country - from the classroom, when a lecture is ongoing. This is a conflict -
classroom does not obstruct information flows as before. On the other side, if students and
teacher use these new possibilities, they can be on another level of learning communication.
What says that your peers sitting physically close to you are the most important ones in your
life or for learning this module? And it is clearly unlikely that the teacher is the best one to
explain x to you with a student with his/her special conditions. [Anders Norberg,
Department of Applied Educational Science, Umeå University]
Adults are unique in how they learn and hence the process of using ICT in adult education
needs to integrate such uniqueness and provide latitude in how an adult is able to interact
with others using dvierse ICT platforms. [Ruth W. Mwangi, Department of Psychology,
University of the Witwatersrand]
19
Adult Social Inclusion in a Digital Environment:
Professional use of ICT - based solutions for social integration
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
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List of authors
Renata OCHOA_DADERSKA - Instytut Badań i Innowacji w Edukacji - INBIE
Yeliz NUR AKARÇAY - Saricam Halk Egitimi Merkezi - Turkey
Javier SANCHEZ GARCIA - EuroFUE-UJI
Emil VELINOV - ITC International
Luis OCHOA SIGUENCIA AWF Katowice - Poland
Agnieszka CHĘCIŃSKA KOPIEC - AWF Katowice - Poland
The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents
which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of
the information contained therein.
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3737920
Article
Full-text available
W dobie wszechobecnych nowoczesnych technologii informacyjno-komunikacyjnych (ICT) nie powinno ich zabraknąć także w procesie kształcenia dorosłych. Nowoczesna edukacja dorosłych odchodzi od encyklopedyzmu dydaktycznego na rzecz łączenia tradycyjnych metod wykładowych z zastosowaniem ICT, z aktywnymi metodami pracy grupowej, warsztatami, treningami czy metodą moderacji. Nowoczesna edukacja dorosłych, to taka, w której edukator nie ma „jednej słusznej” roli oraz jedynej skutecznej metody kształcenia. W zamian za to jako trener, facylitator czy moderator wykorzystuje osobiste zainteresowania, doświadczenie i wewnętrzną motywację dorosłych do uczenia się. Kreując pozytywne i wpierające środowisko uczenia się, motywuje dorosłego ucznia do samodzielnego zdobywania wiedzy, inspiruje i wzmacnia procesy uczenia się. Uczący się, dzięki takim działaniom edukatora, samodzielnie kieruje procesem uczenia się i rozwoju, wzmacnia poczucie własnego sprawstwa, a przez to i własnej wartości.
Teknoloji Okuryazarlığı ve Türkiye İstatistik Kurumu ile Yetişkin Yeterliliklerinin Uluslararası Değerlendirilmesi Programı Verileri Kapsamında Ülkemizde Teknoloji Kullanım Durumu
  • R Bozer
Bozer, R., (2019) 'Teknoloji Okuryazarlığı ve Türkiye İstatistik Kurumu ile Yetişkin Yeterliliklerinin Uluslararası Değerlendirilmesi Programı Verileri Kapsamında Ülkemizde Teknoloji Kullanım Durumu' Yetişkin Eğitimi Dergisi/Cilt: 2/Sayı: 2-
DIGITAL SOCIAL INNOVATION: A PRELIMINARY PORTFOLIO OF COMPETENCIES FOR SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKERS
  • Gilberto Marzano
  • Joanna Lizut
  • Ochoa Siguencia
Marzano, Gilberto, Lizut, Joanna, Ochoa Siguencia, Luis. (2019). DIGITAL SOCIAL INNOVATION: A PRELIMINARY PORTFOLIO OF COMPETENCIES FOR SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKERS. SOCIETY. INTEGRATION. EDUCATION. Proceedings of the International Scientific Conference. 2. 320. 10.17770/sie2019vol2.3864. 20
Use of ICT in the management of educational institutions: the case of Silesian College of Economics and Administration in Bytom -Poland
  • Ochoa Siguencia
Ochoa Siguencia, Luis (2011). Use of ICT in the management of educational institutions: the case of Silesian College of Economics and Administration in Bytom -Poland. In: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on E-learning in the Workplace -ICELW 2011, New York, June 8th-10th 2011. -New York : Kaleidoscope Learning, p. 54-59
Sonuçları Bağlamında Türkiye'de Temel Eğitim Sorunlarını Yeniden Düşünmek
  • A Yıldız
  • H Dindar
  • D Ünlü
  • N Gökçe
  • Ö Kocakurt
  • A Ve Kıral Özüstün
Yıldız, A., Dindar, H., Ünlü, D., Gökçe, N., Kocakurt, Ö. ve Kıral Özüstün, A. (2018). "Yetişkin Yeterliklerinin Uluslararası Değerlendirilmesi Programı (PIACC)" Sonuçları Bağlamında Türkiye'de Temel Eğitim Sorunlarını Yeniden Düşünmek. Ankara 21
Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de información y comunicación en los hogares
INE (2019), Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de información y comunicación en los hogares, INE, https://www.ine.es/dyngs/INEbase/es/operacion.htm?c=Estadistica_C&cid=1254736176 741&menu=ultiDatos&idp=1254735576692
Encuesta sobre el uso de TIC y comercio electrónico en las empresas
INE (2019), Encuesta sobre el uso de TIC y comercio electrónico en las empresas, INE, https://www.ine.es/dyngs/INEbase/es/operacion.htm?c=Estadistica_C&cid=1254736176 743&menu=ultiDatos&idp=1254735576692