ArticleLiterature Review

A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Injury in Crossfit

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

The present study aims to investigate the incidence and pattern of injury in Crossfit. This study used a database search of Crossfit AND Injury for systematic review and metaanalysis. Crossfit seems to be an effective exercise method to decrease weight and BMI while improving function. High intensity interval training improves blood pressure, body fat percentage, lung capacity and pancreas function. Articles meeting inclusion showed that shoulder, back and then knee injuries were the most commonly selfreported in surveys. Incidence of injury is similar to that of other common recreational sports. Some Crossfit movements and participant characteristics may lead to higher incidences of specific injuries and injuries overall. (Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances 29(1):2630, 2020).

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... Injury data, however, was not included in the meta-analytical part of the study, limiting a more detailed and quantified analysis. Gean et al. (2020) reported CrossFit ® injuries to the back, shoulder and knee to be comparable to other forms of weightlifting programs in frequency and occurrence (25). Rodríguez et al. (2021) proposed a similar conclusion regarding injury risk in CrossFit ® , but again without providing pooled data on prevalence and incidence rates (52). ...
Article
This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of injuries in CrossFit® practitioners and the influence of sports practice and demographic characteristics on these injuries. A retrospective cohort study was carried out with 180 CrossFit® practitioners who answered a questionnaire with demographic characteristics (age, body mass, height, and sex), sports characteristics (number of years practicing CrossFit®; training frequency, duration, and training program; and practice of other sports), and presence of any injury suffered and its characteristics (number of injuries, region, and type of injury). The Mann-Whitney U test investigated the difference in continuous variables between those with and without injury history. The chi-square test and Fisher’s exact test investigated the association between categorical variables and the presence or not of injury over the last year. The chi-square goodness-of-fit test investigated if the frequency of injuries per body location and type differed from the expected one. Injury prevalence was 63%. Participants with a history of injury showed a shorter time of CrossFit® practice. The presence of injury history was associated with lesser weekly and daily training frequency, shorter training duration, and Scale training program. The frequency of injuries on leg, knee, lumbar spine, shoulder, and wrist, and the muscle and tendon was greater than expected. The other variables were neither different between groups nor associated with injury presence. Thus, most participants presented injury over the last year, influenced by the sports characteristics but not by demographic characteristics.
Article
Full-text available
ENG: ABSTRACT: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of injuries in CrossFit® practitioners and the influence of sports practice and demographic characteristics on these injuries. A retrospective cohort study was carried out with 180 CrossFit® practitioners who answered a questionnaire with demographic characteristics (age, body mass, height, and sex), sports characteristics(number of years practicing CrossFit®; training frequency, duration, and training program; and practice of other sports), and presence of any injury suffered and its characteristics (number of injuries, region, and type of injury). The Mann-Whitney U test investigated the difference in continuous variables between those with and without injury history. The chi-square test and Fisher’s exact test investigated the association between categorical variables and the presence or not of injury over the last year. The chi-square goodness-of-fit test investigated if the frequency of injuries per body location and type differed from the expected one. Injury prevalence was 63%. Participants with a history of injury showed a shorter time of CrossFit® practice. The presence of injury history was associated with lesser weekly and daily training frequency, shorter training duration, and Scale training program. The frequency of injuries on leg, knee, lumbar spine, shoulder, and wrist, and the muscle and tendon was greater than expected. The other variables were neither different between groups nor associated with injury presence. Thus, most participants presented injury over the last year, influenced by the sports characteristics but not by demographic characteristics / PORT: RESUMO Este estudo teve como objetivo investigar a prevalência de lesões durante um ano em praticantes de CrossFit® e a influência das características da prática esportiva e demográficas nessas lesões. Foi realizado estudo de coorte retrospectivo com 180 praticantes de CrossFit®, que responderam a um questionário sobre: características demográficas (idade, massa corporal, altura e sexo), características da prática esportiva (tempo de prática esportiva, frequência e duração de treino, formação de carga e prática de outro esporte) e ocorrência e características da lesão (quantidade, região lesionada e estrutura acometida). Por meio do teste de Mann-Whitney U, investigou-se a diferença nas variáveis contínuas entre aqueles com e sem histórico de lesão. Utilizando o teste de qui-quadrado e o teste exato de Fisher, avaliou-se a associação entre variáveis categóricas e a presença ou não de lesão. O teste de qui-quadrado goodness-of-fit foi aplicado para investigar se a frequência observada de lesões por região do corpo e por tipo era diferente da esperada. A prevalência de lesão foi de 63%, e aqueles com histórico de lesão tinham menor tempo de prática esportiva. A presença de histórico de lesão foi associada a menor frequência semanal e diária e menor duração de treinos, assim como à formação de carga Scale. A frequência de lesão em perna, joelho, coluna lombar, ombro e punho, assim como do tipo músculo e tendão foi acima da esperada. As demais variáveis não apresentaram diferença entre grupos ou não foram associadas à presença de lesão. Logo, a maioria dos investigados relatou lesão que foi influenciada pelas características da prática esportiva, e não pelas demográficas.
Article
Full-text available
Background: As participants who engage in CrossFit training and competition perform a large volume of high intensity overhead activities, injuries to the shoulder are one of the most common in this sport. Previous research in other sports has indicated that the isokinetic force power profile of the shoulder joint (IPSJ) rotator muscles may assist in the prediction of shoulder injury. Aim: Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the IPSJ in males engaged in CrossFit training at different competitive levels. Methods: In a cross-sectional study design, participants (age, 24.1 ± 2.7 years) classified as 'beginner' (n = 6), 'intermediate' (n = 7) or 'advanced' (n = 9) provided informed consent to participate in this study. The IPSJ assessment involved rotational and diagonal movements, including internal and external shoulder rotator muscles, at both 180°.s-1 and 300°.s-1. The variables analysed were peak torque/body mass (%), mean power (W) and the external/internal peak torque/body mass ratio (%). A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the IPSJ of the three groups, with Dunn's test used for post-hoc analysis. The alpha level was set at p < 0.05. Results: The IPSJ showed greater torque and power values in those who competed at the advanced level as compared to those at a lower competitive level (i.e. intermediate, beginner). This was observed mainly for the internal rotation and internal diagonal movements at both 180°.s-1 and 300°.s-1. However, such differences between competitive levels were, in general, absent for the external rotation and external diagonal movements. Moreover, the participants from the advanced competitive level exhibited an imbalance of peak torque between the muscles responsible for the external-internal rotational and external-internal diagonal movements of the shoulder (i.e. peak torque external/internal ratio <66%), particularly in the dominant shoulder. Conclusion: These findings suggest greater development of the shoulder internal rotators and a higher probability of shoulder injury in CrossFit athletes at the advanced competitive level. Based on these results, participants engaged in CrossFit training and competition may wish to increase the volume of training for the shoulder external rotator muscles to complement the large increases in shoulder internal rotator strength that occur as a part of their regular training regimes.
Chapter
CrossFit, indoor cycling, and aerobic exercises are stimulating actions as they promote rewarding physical and mental well-being. However, even though the athletes and regular sports practitioners train sports movements exhaustively, anatomical and functional issues could play a role in the biomechanical effectiveness of these exercises. Moreover, athletes are prone to injuries when attempting to enhance their performance in order to win a competition or break their personal records. This chapter approaches the most common injuries in fitness exercises, focusing on shoulder, hip, and knee injuries, shin pain, and Achilles tendinopathy, discussing the importance of identifying these factors, taking preventive measures against injuries, and also, making decisions regarding the therapeutic approaches.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.