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Ten times the first year Reflections on ten years of the European First Year Experience Conference

Authors:
  • Artevelde University of Applied Sciences
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Ten times the first year Reflections on ten years of the European First Year Experience Conference

Abstract and Figures

The collection of chapters in this book has been brought together to celebrate 10 years of the European First Year Experience (EFYE) Conference. The chapters provide a taste of some of the key ideas and discussion points raised during EFYE events held in a number of countries across Europe between 2006 and 2016. A number of key writers on the first year experience are represented here, with chapters by established writers and researchers, such as Yorke and Tinto, alongside newer authors in this field. The collection provides a useful resource for anyone interested in better understanding students’ first year experiences. The chapters represent both research about these experiences and examples of practices to enhance them, and would be of interest to lecturers, support staff, managers, researchers and students
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