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Action research as praxis: From being to becoming (a keynote address)

Authors:
  • Urban Discovery Schools

Abstract

In the English language, there are two common understandings of the word Ontology, that of being and becoming. Action research is guided by understandings of the past, is grounded in the present, and is solutions orientated towards a more ideal future state. Guided by the literature and contextual knowledge, an action researcher may simultaneously be a disrupter of the status quo, an instrument of data collection, and the navigator of a political environment. This keynote address focuses on action research as a means of systemic improvement for the Friearian notion of praxis towards our first vocation, that of becoming more human. Dr. Loescher will discuss how action research is being used as a means of emancipatory practice in the service of our students and communities.
Action Research
as Praxis:
For Being to Becoming
Doctoral Research Conference
May 2, 2020
Shawn T. Loescher, Ed.D.
shawn.loescher@asu.edu
© 2020 Shawn T. Loescher
Abstract
In the English language, there are two common
understandings of the word Ontology, that of being and
becoming. Action research is guided by understandings of
the past, is grounded in the present, and is solutions
orientated towards a more ideal future state. Guided by the
literature and contextual knowledge, an action researcher
may simultaneously be a disrupter of the status quo, an
instrument of data collection, and the navigator of a
political environment. This keynote address focuses on
action research as a means of systemic improvement for
the Friearian notion of praxis towards our first vocation,
that of becoming more human. Dr. Loescher will discuss
how action research is being used as a means of
emancipatory practice in the service of our students and
communities.
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University
2
Overview
Acknowledgments
Be[com]ing
Context
Praxis
Reconciliation
Dialogue
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University 3
4
Definition
Ontology
BecomingBeing
Be[com]ing
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University 5
Context
Now
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University 6
Now: A Timeline
November
December
January
February
March
April Doctoral Research Conference 2020
7
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Now: A situational analysis
1.Paradigm-shattering event;
2.From risk-averse to risk
immersed;
3.Compounding existing factors;
4.Factors of super wicked problems.
8Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University
Reflection
If you need to be right before you move,
you will never win. Perfection is the enemy
of good… Speed trumps perfection. And the
problem we have in society at the moment
is everyone is afraid of making a mistake. …
The greatest error is to be paralyzed by the
fear of failure.
- Michael Ryan, World Health Organization
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University 9
Questions
What is the purpose of public
education/schools?
What ought to be the purpose
of public education/schools?
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University 10
Philosophically Framed
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University 11
Philosophical Foundations (Crotty, 1998)
Objectivism
Constructionism
Subjectivism
Educational Philosophy (Gutek, 2004)
Essentialism Progressivism
Reconstructivism
Purpose of Education/School (Postman, 1995)
Support
What Is
Suggest
What’s Next
Create
the Future
Praxis: A definition
Action;
Reflection and
informed decisions;
Human well-being;
Search for truth;
Respect for others; Doctoral Research Conference 2020
12
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Action Research as Praxis
1. Cyclical and reflexive;
2. A process of “re-solving;”
3. Connectedness;
4. Transferability;
5. Democratic and participatory;
6. Seeks a more ideal future state;
13 Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University
Questions
What is the purpose of public
education/schools?
What ought to be the purpose
of public education/schools?
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University 14
Philosophically Framed
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University 15
Philosophical Foundations (Crotty, 1998)
Objectivism
Constructionism
Subjectivism
Educational Philosophy (Gutek, 2004)
Essentialism Progressivism
Reconstructivism
Purpose of Education/School (Postman, 1995)
Support
What Is
Suggest
What’s Next
Create
the Future
Qualities of the Action Researcher
1. Scholarly practitioner;
2. The research is the act of praxis;
3. Navigator of a political environment;
4. Disruptor and change agent;
5. An instrument of the research;
6. Seeker of a more ideal future.
16 Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University
A praxis towards what?
Our first true vocation
To become more human
A pedagogy of liberation
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University 17
Action Research as Praxis
“I have argued here that we must engage in a
pedagogy of liberation, hope, and even defiance of
the mainstay factors that may have institutionalized
caste systems of poverty and oppression.
- Loescher, 2018, p. 2000
18
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University
Emancipatory Practice
Wicked problems;
Social context;
Resource distribution;
Purpose of action.
Doctoral Research Conference 2020
19
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
From Is to Ought to Be
Principled innovation;
Futures of learning;
Emergent practice;
Driven by action
research.
Doctoral Research Conference 2020
20
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Action Research as Praxis
“through action research that we may begin
by accepting our current state as being in
order to move us to a praxis (Freire, 2014;
2011) of the becoming.
- Loescher, 2018, p. 4
21
Action Research as Praxis : From Being to Becoming | May 2, 2020
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College | Doctoral Research Conference | Arizona State University
Dialogue on
Action Research
as Praxis:
For Being to Becoming
Doctoral Research Conference
May 2, 2020
Shawn T. Loescher, Ed.D.
shawn.loescher@asu.edu
© 2020 Shawn T. Loescher
23
References
Anyon, J. (2014). Radical possibilities: Public policy, urban education, and a new social movement (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Taylor and Francis
Carr, W. and Kemmis, S. (1986). Becoming critical. Education, knowledge and action research. Philadelphia, PA: Falmer Press.
Carter, P. L., & Welner, K. G. (2013). Closing the opportunity gap: What America must do to give every child an even chance. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
Crotty, M. (1998). The foundations of social research: Meaning and perspective in the research process. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Ltd.
Freire, P. (1970). Cultural action and conscientization. Harvard Education Review 40(3), 452-477.
Freire, P. (2011). Pedagogy of the oppressed (30th anniversary edition). New York, NY: Continuum.
Gutek, G. L. (2004). Philosophical and ideological voices in education. New York, NY: Pearson.
Ivankova, N. V. (2015). Mixed methods applications in action research: From methods to community action. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Ltd.
Kuhn, T. S. (2012). The structure of scientific revolutions (4th ed.). Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.
Levin, K., Cashore, B., Bernstein, S., & Auld, G. (2012). Overcoming the tragedy of super wicked problems: Constraining our future selves to ameliorate global climate change. Policy
Sciences, 45(2), 123-152. doi: 10.1007/s11077-012-9151-0
Loescher, S. T. (2018). Hope as strategy: The effectiveness of an innovation of the mind. Tempe, AZ: Arizona State University. doi: 10.13140/RG.2.2.28900.83844
Loescher, S. T. (2019, July). Embrace ambiguity! Why predictive metrics aren’t helping. A TED-Ed Innovative Educators TED Talk at the TED Summit, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
Mertler, C. A. (2014). Action research: Improving schools and empowering educators (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Ltd.
Mills, G. E. (2011). Action research: A guide for the teacher researcher (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
Postman, N. (1995). The end of education: Redefining the value of school. New York: NY: Vintage Books.
Rittel, H. W., & Webber, M. M. (1973). Dilemmas in a general theory of planning. Policy Sciences, 4(2), 155-169.
Sartre, J. P. (1956). Being and nothingness: A phenomenological essay on ontology (Trans. H. E. Barnes). New York, NY: Kensington Publishing Group.
Stone, D. (2012). Policy paradox: The art of political decision making (3rd ed.). New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Company.
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Thesis
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