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Abstract

The role of this study was to determine which changes people think they need to make in their home in response to getting older. At an advanced age, the likelihood of different limitations, such as vision impairment, hearing impairment, or physical inability, are increased. At present, when faced with such limitations, tenants are often forced to leave their long-term living spaces, as these spaces cannot serve their “new” individual needs. This transition from the privacy of their home to a new environment is often a painful change. They must leave a well-known environment, as their homes cannot be adapted to their new needs. The aim of this paper is to develop a comprehensive approach for the design of an exterior and interior space which can serve people through all stages of life, particularly in terms of mobility. This means that, even if an unexpected situation incurs changes in an individual's movement abilities or physiological limitations not only by natural aging, but also according to accidents or disabilities their living space can be adapted to the given conditions. The results of a survey conducted in Germany and Slovakia are presented. In the survey, respondents expressed their opinion on what they considered important in creating an adaptive environment, considering various life changes. The results of the survey are statistically processed and analyzed by the ANOVA method, a form of statistical hypothesis testing. The results are processed graphically and presented in tables, along with explanations. The results could be of an interest to the architects and designers of such environments. Based on the results of the survey, studies of possible modifications of flats and houses are developed. These results are analyzed in terms of three age groups: people aged below 35, those aged 35–50, and those aged over 50. People under 35 are considered to be quite young, with different views on life and on the environment. Their priorities typically differ from those of people around 50. People aged 50 more; have been under medical treatment for a consistent amount of time. This group of people is still active; however, they experience different design requirements for their potential home.

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... The research carried out in recent decades on sustainable development has mainly focused on the economic and environmental dimensions, leaving aside the social one [1,2]. The social dimension focuses on well-being and on the development and maintenance of pleasant working and living spaces by understanding the material, social and emotional needs of individuals [3][4][5], beyond economic interest [6]. ...
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Barrier-free environment should be an obvious part of our life. The reality is but different. In non-residential buildings specified for use by the public one can uselessly look for information useful for persons with limited ability of movement and orientation. The question of information boards is very disregarded and often non-dealt with at all. Upon entry into most of the buildings you will not find any optical system for deaf people, acoustic system (voice light) for blind people or information related to barrier-free access for people with movement handicap. Project engineer, upon performing his work has to take into consideration the fact that building being designed shall be used by all groups of citizens. Try to look around with eyes of a person who moves on wheelchair or through a walking stick. You will find missing information and orientation system on possibilities of barrier-free movement inside the building on each and every building.
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Evaluation of Questionnaire Data Views on the Design of Living Space for Different Situations in Life
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Brausch, C., Katunský, D., Katunská, J., 2019. Evaluation of Questionnaire Data Views on the Design of Living Space for Different Situations in Life. https://doi.org/10.20944/ preprints201904.0260v1.
Transitions: Making Sense of life's Changes
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Persons with disabilities: identifying a scenario for the insertion of the occupational therapist in the interior of Rio Grande
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Janner, B., Delboni, M.C.C., Ferreira, T.G., Ponte, A.S., Pommerehn, J., 2018. Persons with disabilities: identifying a scenario for the insertion of the occupational therapist in the interior of Rio Grande. Sul. Revisbrat Interinst. Bras. Ter. Ocup. Rio de Janeiro 2 (1), 68-84.
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