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Virtual Quality Management in the Era of Industry 4.0

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... Cybernetics is a topic concerned with systems and their regulation (Beer, 2002). As the business environment becomes increasingly reliant on cyber-physical systems, digitization and automation become key for Quality 4.0, and the use of sensors and automation technologies takes a significant part of the discussion (Bodi, 2020;. ...
... However, the SPC can focus on controlling a system from an organizational management perspective as opposed to controlling isolated processes. Moreover, digital solutions which collect information in realtime, provide SPC in real-time (Costantino, Di Gravio, Shaban, & Tronci, 2015;Urban & Landryová, 2015;Bodi, 2020). Automated process optimization in real-time can be achieved by calculating and implementing ideal process parameters to increase efficiency (Oditis & Bicevskis, 2010;D'Addona & Teti, 2013;Bodi, 2020). ...
... Moreover, digital solutions which collect information in realtime, provide SPC in real-time (Costantino, Di Gravio, Shaban, & Tronci, 2015;Urban & Landryová, 2015;Bodi, 2020). Automated process optimization in real-time can be achieved by calculating and implementing ideal process parameters to increase efficiency (Oditis & Bicevskis, 2010;D'Addona & Teti, 2013;Bodi, 2020). ...
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