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A Model of Brand Cocreation, Brand Immersion, Their Antecedents and Consequences in Café Brand Context

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... Third, several consumer-related outcomes such as satisfaction and loyalty have been studied for their relation to cocreation, while a comprehensive assessment of attitude toward a brand with its cognitive, affective and conative dimensions received scant attention. Acikgoz and Tasci (2020) recently suggested integrating several of these variables; however, their study is conceptual without any empirical results. ...
... Sixth, the outcomes of the sense of brand community, cocreation and brand engagement/immersion are conceptualized from the perspective of brands' well-being or attitude toward a brand. Acikgoz and Tasci (2020) recommend considering the well-being of consumers in relation to cocreation and its correlates. Thus, future studies can also have the consumers' well-being (including social well-being, emotional well-being, etc.) along with the brands' well-being to see if they have any contribution to consumers' well-being as well. ...
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A framework for measuring psychological sense of community for community organizations was presented, and an instrument to measure community organization sense of community was developed. The framework consisted of four components: Relationship to the Organization, Organization as Mediator, Influence of the Community Organization, and Bond to the Community. Two studies examined the dimensionality, reliability, and validity of the instrument. Study 1 (n = 218) was conducted with participants from three community organizations, and it identified four factors, matching the framework, with alpha coefficients from .61 to .85. Study 2 (n = 1,676) was conducted with participants from five community organizations. Study 2 participants were 48% African American, 42% White, 6% Latino/Hispanic, and 3% Other. Also for the Study 2 sample, 69% were female; 31% were male. Study 2 confirmed three factors for the Community Organization Sense of Community scale (COSOC): Relationship to the Organization, Organization as Mediator, Bond to the Community; alpha coefficients ranged from .82 to .87. In three subsamples of Study 2, convergent validity of the instrument was explored by correlating total COSOC scores and subscale scores with two other measures of sense of community, political participation, community involvement, community organization involvement, and perceived safety. The patterns of correlation among the variables indicated, with one exception: strong support for validity of the instrument. Findings are discussed in terms of implications for development of sense of community in community organizations, and community participation. © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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