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A POSITIVE JOURNEY BEYOND THE COMFORT ZONE

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The paper discusses the challenges of the planetary (climate, biodiversity) crises we are facing. Science has given us one wake-up call after the other. Planetary boundaries have been overstepped. We are starting to feel the bite of climate disruption worldwide. Extreme weather events are multiplying. The conditions necessary for human settlements and food production are deteriorating across the planet. The sixth mass extinction is decimating our wildlife. The fabric of society is increasingly fragile. Together, these challenges threaten our ways of life, our prosperity and the future of our children. Recent outcomes from science are calling for unprecedented and rapid transformation. This discussion paper puts forward a systemic analysis and offers perspectives on unprecedented change and its possible implications for Europe. To illustrate ways forward, the authors have worked on twelve key levers for unprecedented change with high systemic impact and the potential to catalyse positive transformation. They cover a broad range of transformative change processes concerning behaviours, governance, values and technologies. In summary, the twelve levers are energy, mobility, food, carbon removal, regeneration, resilience and preparedness, climate justice, finance, trade, prosperity, social values and democracy. The European Union has the opportunity of catalysing the change needed to turn away from our current path. The EU has the capacity to host a new conversation and orchestrate the necessary change with all actors. It needs to team up with citizens, young people, business and others willing and able to effect change. This discussion paper is intended as a possible input into this effort. DISCLAIMER: The information and views set out in this publication are those of the authors and do not reflect the official opinion of the institutions where they work. Neither the European Union institutions and bodies, nor any person acting on their behalf, may be held responsible for the use which may be made of the information contained therein.
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