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ScreenPlay : A topic-theory-inspired interactive system

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ScreenPlay : A topic-theory-inspired interactive system

Abstract

ScreenPlay is a unique interactive computer music system (ICMS) that draws upon various computational styles from within the field of human–computer interaction (HCI) in music, allowing it to transcend the socially contextual boundaries that separate different approaches to ICMS design and implementation, as well as the overarching spheres of experimental/academic and popular electronic musics. A key aspect of ScreenPlay ’s design in achieving this is the novel inclusion of topic theory, which also enables ScreenPlay to bridge a gap spanning both time and genre between Classical/Romantic era music and contemporary electronic music; providing new and creative insights into the subject of topic theory and its potential for reappropriation within the sonic arts.
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ScreenPlay: A topic-theory-inspired interactive system
Organised Sound, Volume 25, Issue 1
GEORGE MEIKLE
DOI: 10.1017/S1355771819000499
Published online: 04 March 2020, pp. 89-105
Print publication: April 2020
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Summary
ScreenPlay is a unique interactive computer music system (ICMS) that draws upon various computational styles from
within the field of human–computer interaction (HCI) in music, allowing it to transcend the socially contextual
boundaries that separate different approaches to ICMS design and implementation, as well as the overarching
spheres of experimental/academic and popular electronic musics. A key aspect of ScreenPlay’s design in achieving
this is the novel inclusion of topic theory, which also enables ScreenPlay to bridge a gap spanning both time and
genre between Classical/Romantic era music and contemporary electronic music; providing new and creative
insights into the subject of topic theory and its potential for reappropriation within the sonic arts.
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