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Personas desaparecidas. Un estudio piloto de casos.

Authors:
  • Ministerio del Interior - Secretaría de Estado de Seguridad

Abstract

En España, cualquier tipo de desaparición con independencia de la motivación subyacente, es objeto de atención policial, por lo que se considera muy importante ayudar a las FCS a priorizar sus actuaciones sobre aquellos casos más graves: aquellas en las que la persona resulta lesionada o herida y, en la peor de las situaciones, fallecida. Para abordar estos retos, desde el Ministerio del Interior, se están llevando a cabo diferentes iniciativas. Una de éstas ha consistido en la contratación del Instituto de Ciencias Forenses y de la Seguridad (ICFS) de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, como entidad académica y científica, para la recopilación de la documentación policial (atestados) de una muestra numerosa de casos reales, a nivel nacional, esclarecidos, y el posterior vaciado y análisis estadístico univariante, bivariante, y multivariante de los datos, en una iniciativa pionera hasta el momento en España.
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... Some findings suggest that adults and elderly people are more likely to suffer fatal outcomes (Hayden and Shalev-Greene, 2018;Newiss, 2006). In Spain, García-Barceló et al. (2020a) found that being located in a good state of health was present in a higher proportion of minors, whereas being located harmed or deceased was present in a higher proportion of adults. ...
... Some findings suggest that adults and elderly people are more likely to suffer fatal outcomes (Hayden and Shalev-Greene, 2018;Newiss, 2006). In Spain, García-Barceló et al. (2020a) found that being located in a good state of health was present in a higher proportion of minors, whereas being located harmed or deceased was present in a higher proportion of adults. ...
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