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A Proposal for the Work Engagement Development Canvas Contributing to the Development of Work Engagement

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Abstract

Employee engagement is positively and significantly related to their productivity, creativity, innovativeness, customer service as well as in-role and extra-role behaviors. The purpose of this study is to propose the Work Engagement Develop Canvas (WEDC), which aims to enhance employee work engagement. The evaluation method of this study is to check outputs where participants described the WEDC as well as to collect two types of questionnaires: A Pre-implementation questionnaire and a post-implementation questionnaire. Additionally, the evaluation is carried out by (1) Checking the output (2) Paired t-test, and (3) Open Coding. The novelty of this study is to focus on enhancing work engagement through the visualization of employees’ own thoughts.

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