NUEVA GUÍA DE LOS MURCIÉLAGOS DE ARGENTINA

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Isbn: 978-987-86-3524-8
Publisher: PCMA (Programa de Conservación de los Murciélagos de Argentina)
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Abstract
En esta guía se actualizan e incrementan las distribuciones de muchas especies, incluyendo extensiones de especies a nuevas provincias, como resultados de un aumento muy significativo de muestreos de campo e incorporación de ejemplares en las colecciones sistemáticas (Barquez et al. 2011 a, b, 2013; Bracamonte y Lutz 2013; Castilla et al. 2010, 2013; Díaz et al. 2017, 2018, 2019 a, b; Gamboa Alurralde et al. 2016, Giménez y Schiaffini 2019; Idoeta et al. 2012, 2015; Lutz et al. 2016; Massa et al. 2014; Montani et al. 2018, Pautasso et al. 2009, Pavé et al. 2017, De Sousa y Pavé 2009, Teta et al. 2009, Udrizar Sauthier et al. 2013). Entendemos que esta guía será una herramienta de utilidad para la identificación de las especies, en el campo y en las colecciones sistemáticas, y no sólo para investigadores, sino también para estudiantes, guardaparques y público en general; al mismo tiempo esperamos que sirva para incentivar el desarrollo de más estudios sobre este grupo en la Argentina.
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