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Effects of Colors on Cognition and Emotions in Learning

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Abstract

Chang, B. , & Xu, R. (2019). Effects of colors on cognition and emotions in learning. Technology, Instruction, Cognition, Learning, 11 (4), 287–302. The purpose of this review paper was to conduct a literature review on the effects of colors on learners' learning cognition and emotions. Findings of this review could inform practitioners about better color choices they could use to present information and design learning materials in ways that decrease learners' cognitive load, increase their attitudes and motivation, help them process and comprehend learning materials easily, and improve their learning performance. This review could aid in design of future instructional materials, particularly when it comes to the use of specific highlighting colors. It could also provide practitioners color choices that could be used to help learners increase their attention to materials and help practitioners see the connections between colors, emotions, and cognitive learning.

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