Preprint

Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI): Challenges and opportunities for the implementation of research programs based on the 4E approach to cognition

Authors:
To read the file of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Recent developments in psychology and neuroscience have greatly advanced our understanding of cognition. But while classical laboratory experiments have been crucial to informing models of brain functioning, these types of experiments generally do not capture the experiences of the real world and therefore lack ecological validity. Due to the nature of study designs, an understanding of the dynamics of the brain/body system in action in the world has been missing. However, new epistemological and methodological approaches promise a radical solution to this problem.This paper begins by briefly presenting the target theoretical framework for this special edition, which matches the theoretical needs of recent technological advancements in the field of Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI). We provide empirical evidence to justify the paradigmatic change and review the technological developments which made it possible. Finally, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for research programs based on this paradigm. PrePrint: https://psyarxiv.com/cnjr4/

No file available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the file of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... EEG impedances were adjusted and the eyetracker was calibrated following standardized manufacturer's instructions. However, final recordings were not included in our analysis, due to large artefactual signals and extended periods of missing data (Parada, Grasso-Cladera, Rossi, Costa-Cordella, & Fuchs, 2020). Eye-tracker calibration consisted of staring at a manufacturer-provided calibration card held in front of the participant until the calibration was successful. ...
... El equipo de adquisición de datos consistió en (1) una pequeña mochila que contenía el ordenador para la grabación, (2) un rastreador ocular de gafas Tobii 2, (3) un sistema de posicionamiento global (GPS), y (4) un electroencefalograma (EEG) ENOBIO 8. Las impedancias del EEG fueron reguladas y el rastreador ocular fue calibrado según las instrucciones estandarizadas del fabricante. No obstante, las grabaciones finales no se incluyeron en nuestro análisis debido a las intensas señales emitidas por los artefactos y a los extensos periodos de datos perdidos (Parada, Grasso-Cladera, Rossi, Costa-Cordella, & Fuchs, 2020). La calibración del rastreador ocular consistió en mirar una tarjeta de calibración proporcionada por el fabricante, sostenida frente al participante hasta que se consiguió la calibración adecuada. ...
Preprint
Urban environments are increasing worldwide, providing access to public facilities. Nevertheless, specific city features such as environmental noise have been related to health detriments. Deleterious effects of noise in health might depend on socioeconomic and demographic factors. The present mixed-method exploratory study examines the relationship between first-person experience while walking through neighborhoods in Santiago, Chile. Geo-referenced mobile eye-tracking measured first-person audio-visual perceptual experience while interviewed. Logistic regression was used to study the relationship between environmental noise, socioeconomic status, and specific ‘positive’ and ‘negative’ self-reported experiences during walking.Our results suggest that reporting negative experiences depends on environmental noise levels for higher and middle-income neighborhoods. However, in lower-income neighborhoods, higher environmental noise was associated with positive experiences, while lower noise was reported as negative.We interpret these results considering that access to public facilities (e.g. supermarkets, banks) is usually concentrated along main, noisy streets and, in lower-income neighborhoods, this meant benefits of urbanicity (i.e. access to services and facilities, green areas). Furthermore, our results suggest an impact of urban planning and development on socio-economic inequality.
... EEG impedances were adjusted and the eyetracker was calibrated following standardized manufacturer's instructions. However, final recordings were not included in our analysis, due to large artefactual signals and extended periods of missing data (Parada, Grasso-Cladera, Rossi, Costa-Cordella, & Fuchs, 2020). Eye-tracker calibration consisted of staring at a manufacturer-provided calibration card held in front of the participant until the calibration was successful. ...
... El equipo de adquisición de datos consistió en (1) una pequeña mochila que contenía el ordenador para la grabación, (2) un rastreador ocular de gafas Tobii 2, (3) un sistema de posicionamiento global (GPS), y (4) un electroencefalograma (EEG) ENOBIO 8. Las impedancias del EEG fueron reguladas y el rastreador ocular fue calibrado según las instrucciones estandarizadas del fabricante. No obstante, las grabaciones finales no se incluyeron en nuestro análisis debido a las intensas señales emitidas por los artefactos y a los extensos periodos de datos perdidos (Parada, Grasso-Cladera, Rossi, Costa-Cordella, & Fuchs, 2020). La calibración del rastreador ocular consistió en mirar una tarjeta de calibración proporcionada por el fabricante, sostenida frente al participante hasta que se consiguió la calibración adecuada. ...
Article
Full-text available
Specific city features such as environmental noise have been related to psychological distress. The effects of noise — as a health risk variable — might depend on socioeconomic and demographic factors. However, this has not been fully tested yet. The present work explored the relationship between pedestrians’ first-person experience in the presence of natural urban environmental noise while walking through neighbourhoods in Santiago, Chile. Participants completed a predetermined guided walk. Geo-referenced mobile eye-tracking measured first-person audio-visual perceptual experience while being interviewed in situ. Results show the likelihood of reporting negative experiences is higher when environmental noise increases, while the likelihood of reporting positive experiences is reduced when environmental noise decreases. However, when socioeconomic status is considered as regressor, lower-income neighbourhoods report the inverse effect. We interpret these findings taking into account accessibility to green areas, public safety and access to public facilities that noisy environments afford. We hypothesize that the augmentation of environmental noise in lower-income neighbourhoods is associated with urbanicity benefits. Our results document the phenomenological impact of inequality in urban planning and development.
... When examining cognition, neuroscientists traditionally try to isolate cognitive processes in order to exclude disturbing influences. Advances in neuroscientific technology enable us to transfer the knowledge gained in the laboratory into more ecologically valid settings and to investigate to what extent these neuronal processes occur under less controlled circumstances (Ladouce et al., 2016;Parada et al., 2020). ...
Article
Full-text available
Laboratory electroencephalography (EEG) studies have already provided important insights into the neuronal mechanisms of performance monitoring. However, to our knowledge no study so far has examined neuronal correlates of performance monitoring using an ecologically valid task outside a typical laboratory setting. Therefore, we examined midfrontal theta and the feedback-related negativity (FRN) using mobile EEG in a physical shooting task within an ecologically valid environment with highly dynamical visual feedback. Participants shot a target using a toy gun while moving and looking around freely. Shots that missed the target evoked stronger midfrontal theta activity than hits, and this response was rather phase-unlocked. There was no difference between misses and hits in the FRN. The results raise the question whether the absence of certain ERP components like the FRN could be due to methodological reasons or to the fact that partially different neuronal processes may be activated in the laboratory as compared to more ecologically valid tasks. Overall, our results indicate that crucial neurocognitive processes of performance monitoring can be assessed in highly dynamic and ecologically valid settings by mobile EEG.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.