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Enacting metaphors to explore relations and interactions with automated driving systems

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Abstract

Conventional interaction design methodologies cannot fully encompass the redefined relationships between humans and increasingly intelligent technology. New methods are necessary to address interaction at early stages in the design process. Both design metaphors and enactment techniques have been suggested, and this paper explores whether a combination of these can support the design of future interactions. Across three workshops, 27 participants utilised the combination to design the interaction with an automated driving system. Analysis shows that the method combination supported imagining and designing; metaphors aided the creation of a joint conceptual vision of the relationship, and the enactment created tangible experiences and contextualisation of the design concepts. Jointly the methods brought together multi-disciplinary teams in a shared vision, by acting as a shared language and enacted representations of insights that could be engaged with and experienced together.

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... Hence, new design methods, such as metaphors and enactment techniques, might be needed to support MaaS co-creation processes (cf. Strömberg et al., 2020). Furthermore, what is best for (and thus requested by) users is not necessarily what is best for society (Sochor et al., 2015b). ...
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