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The Physics of Subatomic Particles and their Behavior Modeled with Classical Laws

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Abstract and Figures

Using the physics of sound waves as a foundation, subatomic particles and their behaviors are modeled with classical mechanics to calculate the Planck energy, the electron's energy and the energy levels of the first two atoms: hydrogen and helium. Five different methods are used to calculate energies, including spring-mass systems and wave systems, and all five are found to be equal in their calculations.
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1
The Physics of Subatomic Particles
and their Behavior Modeled with Classical Laws
Jeff Yee & Lori Gardi
∗#jeffsyee@gmail.com/
†#lori.anne.gardi@gmail.com
January 12, 2020
Abstract: Using the physics of sound waves as a foundation, subatomic particles and their behaviors are modeled
with classical mechanics to calculate the Planck energy, the electron’s energy and the energy levels of the first two
atoms: hydrogen and helium. Five different methods are used to calculate energies, including spring-mass systems
and wave systems, and all five are found to be equal in their calculations.
Summary of Results
Energies of particles and atoms are calculated using five methods to demonstrate that the laws of classical mechanics
can be applied to subatomic particles. The following methods, each with its own section in this paper detailing its
equations, are used to calculate energy values found in Table 1:
1. Planck Energy Ratio A ratio of energy decreasing from a center object of Planck mass and radius of Planck length
2. Spring (1D) The energy of a spring-mass system with a single mass in one dimension
3. Spring (1D Series) – The energy of multiple masses connected in series in a spring-mass system in one dimension
4. Wave (1D) The energy of a wave in one dimension
5. Wave (3D) – The energy of a wave calculated spherically from a center in three dimensions
Energy values for each method were calculated at four distances, including a hypothetical particle with radius of
Planck length, the electron particle using the electron’s classical radius and two atoms: hydrogen and helium. Energy
(E) values found in this table, and throughout this paper are measured in joules (kg * m2/s2). All other units are
specified in their respective equations. The values and units for all constants in this paper are found in the Appendix.
Planck Energy Ratio
Spring (1D)
Spring (1D Series)
Wave (1D)
Wave (3D)
Planck length
1.96 x 109
1.96 x 109
1.96 x 109
1.96 x 109
N/A
Electron radiusa
8.19 x 10-14
8.19 x 10-14
8.19 x 10-14
8.19 x 10-14
8.19 x 10-14
Hydrogen radiusa,b
4.36 x 10-18
4.36 x 10-18
4.36 x 10-18
4.36 x 10-18
4.36 x 10-18
Helium radiusa,b
7.69 x 10-18
7.69 x 10-18
7.69 x 10-18
7.69 x 10-18
7.69 x 10-18
a – Energy based on electron uses elementary charge amplitude (square of Planck charge and fine structure constant)
bEnergy of atom at radius from nucleus; photon energy is half of the value
Table 1Calculated energies at various distances using classical equations. All calculations in joules (kg*m2/s2).
The energy values using each method were found to be equal. The energy at the Planck length is found to be the
Planck energy (1.96 x 109 joules) [
1
]. The energy at the electron’s radius is found to be the electron’s known rest
energy (8.19 x 10-14 joules). The energy for hydrogen is found to be the Hartree energy (4.36 x 10-18 joules). And the
2
energies for hydrogen and helium atoms are the Coulomb energies at a distance, which can be derived as a force
between two particles. Note that the energy values for hydrogen and helium are exactly twice the energy of their
photons. Specifically, the photon energy in hydrogen 1s ionization is 2.18 x 10-18 joules (half of 4.36 x 10-18), and for
helium 1s ionization it is 2.3 MJ/mol, or 3.8 x 10-18 joules (half of 7.69 x 10-18).
In Table 1, one calculation was not possible. The method used to derive the energy values using the equations in
Section 5, Wave (3D), is based on the electron and not used to calculate the Planck energy. It is listed as N/A.
It is not surprising that these equations for various spring-mass systems and waves are equivalent. In fact, the energy
of sound can be modeled as the conservation of energy of a loudspeaker vibrating as a spring-mass system, creating
sound waves in air. There are known classical mechanics equations to model the behavior of sound energy. What is
surprising, however, is that these same equations have not been applied to subatomic particles and their behavior.
The Physics of Air and Sound
The behavior of subatomic particles begins with a review of the physics of sound, within air, which can be calculated
using classical mechanics [
2
]. Since it will be shown that subatomic particles can be modeled with the same equations,
the sizes of air molecules and distances between molecules have been adjusted to values at the subatomic scale. For
clarity, this paper does not suggest air molecules fill the vacuum of space it is only used to illustrate the similarities
of the physics of wave behavior in molecules and the wave behavior in subatomic particles.
First, imagine a sphere of air with a radius of the Bohr radius (a0), which is referred to in this paper as rh, for the radius
of hydrogen. This sphere of air has a known density (r). Each air molecule has a radius of Planck length (lP), equally
spaced apart with no motion, as shown in Fig. 1. If energy is a measurement of sound energy the motion of air
molecules then the sphere in Fig. 1 would be considered to have no energy.
Fig. 1A sphere of air molecules (with adjusted properties for size)
Next, imagine a speaker is placed in the center of this sphere, creating sound waves as described in the next figure.
The vibrational motion of air molecules creates longitudinal wave patterns which are sound waves, with a defined
wavelength (l) and an amplitude (A) that decreases with distance as molecules spread energy to a greater number of
molecules when waves spread spherically from the center. Now, if sound energy is considered as the measurement
of energy, then the sphere is considered to have energy. Sound exists and it can be detected by measuring tools.
3
Fig. 2Sound moving through air as longitudinal waves with amplitude (A) and wavelength (l).
Wave equations can be used to calculate sound energy, but due to the conservation of energy rule, it becomes simple
to determine the energy of sound waves from the source that produced them. The speaker in the center of Fig. 2
that produces sound vibrates as a spring-mass system as the diaphragm expands and contracts to move air molecules.
The potential energy of a spring is U=½kx2, where k is the spring constant and x is the displacement. In this case,
the maximum displacement is the amplitude, so x is assigned the letter (A) for maximum amplitude. The total energy
(E) is calculated for a diaphragm that expands and contracts, returning to equilibrium, so E=2U. This becomes the
equation to calculate the energy produced by the speaker:
(1)
Now, imagine that the phenomenon known as standing waves occurs near the center of the sphere, but does not
occur throughout the entire sphere. These standing, longitudinal waves are composed of vibrating air molecules
creating sound, as wave motion in opposite directions are equal such that there is no net propagation of energy within
the volume [
3
]. It is considered to be stored energy within this spherical volume of standing waves, where the volume
has a defined radius at the edge of standing waves of length re (for the electron’s classical radius).
Fig. 3 – Standing waves at the center of a sphere (highlighted red) to a distance of re.
This is the physics of sound. Energy exists within the entire sphere, but how does one know that it contains energy?
Imagine three different types of experiments to measure this energy, or what can be derived from energy, at three
points described in the next figure as: 1) motion, 2) light and 3) weight.
4
Fig. 4 – Measuring energy within the sphere using three methods: 1) motion, 2) light and 3) weight.
The first experiment for motion from sound is straightforward. An object, such as a ping pong ball, can be placed at
a distance from the speaker and the force on that object can be calculated based on its acceleration. Energy is force
over a distance (E=Fr), thus energy can be determined knowing the force and distance from the source. Its energy
is found to be greater as amplitude increases or distance decreases.
The second experiment is not as common, but exists in special cases when sound produces light in a process referred
to as sonoluminescence, where a small bubble is acoustically suspended and vibrated at given sound wave frequencies
to create light [
4
]. Light is energy. Its energy, which will be detailed in Section 3, is found to be greater as its frequency
increases (E=hf).
The third experiment is more difficult for sound, but will be shown to occur for particles. Imagine that stored energy
within standing waves is contained in a volume like a balloon, such that an external force like gravity is applied to
determine its energy through measurements like mass and weight. Its energy is found as the relation between mass
and wave speed (E=mc2).
The Physics of Sound with No Air
Sound is possible because of the motion of air molecules. It has a medium for sound waves to propagate.
Nevertheless, imagine a scenario where energies and forces from the three previous experiments needed to be
calculated and their results explained without air molecules. No air. Because human eyes cannot see air molecules,
they are deemed to not exist in this implausible scenario, yet it is still possible to perform calculations and explain the
experiments.
To explain the physics of sound with no air in the previous example of a sphere with Bohr radius (rh), all air molecules
are collapsed to be a single molecule in the center of the sphere. To do this, the total number of molecules and the
mass of each one is determined before collapsing to a single mass. From a separate paper on the Geometry of Spacetime
and the Unification of Forces, a structure of granules was proposed due to the relationship of Planck length and Avogadro’s
number in hydrogen [
5
]. The total number (N) and mass (mg) proposed below can be derived from this relationship,
but the importance of these numbers for this paper is not as significant as the density property. The total number
and mass may vary as long as density is maintained.
mggranule mass (1.18936x 10-80 kg)
N – number granules in hydrogen sphere (1.82995 x 1072)
In this scenario, and for illustration only, the number of air molecules from Fig. 1 is assumed to be N, the mass of
each air molecule is mg and the radius of each air molecule is lP. All molecules are collapsed to be a single molecule,
5
still maintaining the same Planck length (lP) size, but now with a significantly higher mass (mP). As a result, only empty
space surrounds the sphere not occupied by the single mass at its center.
Fig. 5An empty sphere with only a single mass at the center of mP and radius lP affecting nearby particles.
After collapsing all mass to the center, the mass of the single air molecule is Planck mass (mP) – 2.1768 x 10-8 kg.
(2)
It is the density property that is important for maintaining calculations for sound waves in air, and also for a single
mass with no air. Adding the collective mass of all air molecules or a single mass at the center is the same. The
density of the Planck mass within this spherical volume of Bohr radius (hydrogen) is a very dense 4 x 1022 kg/m3.
(3)
In the next sections, the physics of sound is applied to subatomic particles, where the same equations can be used to
describe sound without any air molecules for waves. Or, they can be used to describe energies of particles as waves
within a medium in what is currently considered to be empty space. Both scenarios, while seemingly strange, can be
shown to be the same physics and that their energies are equal.
1. The Physics of Particles and the Planck Energy Ratio
The first of five methods used to calculate energies is a single mass at the center of a sphere, radiating energy
throughout empty space, measured by objects at defined distances. In the previous example, air molecules collapse
to a single molecule of Planck mass (mP) and a radius of Planck length (lP). The energy of this mass is known as the
Planck energy (EP), 1.96 x 109 joules.
(1.1)
Energy radiates from the single molecule, declining at a distance r from the center as described in the next figure.
6
Fig. 6Planck energy (EP) radiating from the center of a sphere, decreasing energy (Ex) at each measured distance (rx)
Although there is no explanation for how this energy radiates spherically from the center, it can be calculated with a
simple equation using the Planck energy (EP), and a ratio of the center object’s radius (lP) and measured distance (r).
(1.2)
Eq. 1.2 will be used to demonstrate energies of particles and atoms found in Table 1. Like a sound wave traveling in
space without air, the same is believed of subatomic particles and their forces traveling in the vacuum of space without
a medium.
First, a note about all calculations that are based on the electron particle in this paper. Due to the spin of the electron,
some longitudinal wave energy is lost because it is used for spin. All energy calculations for the electron (Ex) are
reduced by a factor of the fine structure constant (ae), as expressed in the next equation.
(1.3)
Energy is now calculated using the Planck energy ratio method for the four distances found in Table 1. The first
calculation (ElP) uses the ratio from Eq. 1.2, resulting in the Planck energy. The remaining calculations are based on
the electron and use the ratio from Eq. 1.3, resulting in the calculations for the electron’s rest energy (Ee), the energy
at the Bohr radius of hydrogen (Eh) and the energy at the 1s orbital distance of helium (Ehe).
(1.4)
(1.5)
(1.6)
(1.7)
7
As explained in the Summary of Results, the energy values for hydrogen and helium are twice the energies of the
photons found in their ionization. This can be explained by the fact that there are two electrons per lobe in the atom
to complete its energy. Beyond helium, this method can be used, but elements beginning with lithium have additional
electrons at various distances from the nucleus that need to be considered. A separate paper on Atomic Orbitals lays
out the framework to calculate elements with two or more orbitals [
6
]. But the principle remains the same and the
energies of photons can be calculated with classical mechanics.
2. Spring-Mass Energy (1DSingle Mass)
Although the method in the previous section calculates the Planck energy, the electron’s energy and the energies for
the first two elements at their first orbital, it provides no explanation as to how this energy propagates. For example,
if the experiment was measuring sound energy propagating from the speaker at the center of the sphere, able to move
a ping pong ball at a Bohr radius distance from the center, one would question how the ping pong ball moved if there
was only empty space no air.
A solution to this problem is the motion of the center mass. In the next figure, the center mass of Planck mass (mP)
is shown to vibrate from the center, colliding with the object at a distance r. If it vibrates and returns to its initial
position, then its harmonic motion can be modeled like a spring-mass system [
7
].
Fig. 7Spring-mass system of a single mass (mP) and a spring constant k.
As explained earlier, the potential energy (U) is ½kx2 for the spring-mass, where the max displacement amplitude is
A, and the energy value is twice the potential energy as it expands and then contracts to equilibrium. Eq. 1 is shown
again in Eq. 2.1. In a spring-mass system, the spring constant (k) is calculated as force (F) divided by distance (r).
(2.1)
(2.2)
The force in the spring constant is already known and was found by Charles-Augustin de Coulomb and is now called
Coulomb’s constant (ke). What Coulomb found is the property of an electric universe that exists between particles,
and can also be represented in a spring-mass system as the spring constant (k) when this force is divided by distance
(Eq. 2.3). Note that despite using the same letter “k”, the units for the spring constant (k) and Coulomb’s constant (ke) are different.
8
(2.3)
(2.4)
Substituting Eq. 2.3 into 2.1 yields the energy equation in Eq. 2.4 – the equation that is used to determine the energy
of a one-dimensional spring-mass system for the second method. For a single particle, wave amplitude (A) is the
Planck charge (qP), which is the maximum displacement distance of the mass. Therefore, Planck charge in SI units is
meters.
Eq. 2.4 is used for all four distances found in Table 1, and once again the values are found to be identical. The Planck
energy (ElP) is found in Eq. 2.5 and the electron’s energy is found in Eq. 2.6. Note that the fine structure constant is
applied again to the amplitude for electron-based calculations. The energies for hydrogen and helium use an identical
method as the electron’s energy, with exception of distance (r), and are not repeated.
(2.5)
(2.6)
For upcoming sections, it is better to expand Coulomb’s constant as the magnetic constant (µ0) to describe waves,
because it is hiding the constant for wave speed (c). The relation of these two is found in Eq. 2.7. Eq. 2.4 is then
rewritten to substitute for the magnetic constant and wave speed.
(2.7)
(2.8)
The magnetic constant can be further derived, showing the properties of the one-dimensional spring-mass with a
mass of Planck mass, a radius of Planck length, and such mass being displaced a distance of Planck charge. The
following is the derivation of the magnetic constant in Planck units.
(2.9)
The units of Eq. 2.9 are of particular importance. A mass times a length, divided by length squared is SI units of
kilogram per meter. This is a linear density. Section 4 will explain this density property in more detail.
9
3. Spring-Mass Energy (1D Series of Connected Masses)
While the mathematics of harmonic motion of a single mass from the previous section work, it is difficult to imagine
that a center mass within a particle vibrates potentially to infinity to affect other particles. It is more likely that it has
a cascading effect, with multiple masses in motion, each vibrating and returning to equilibrium. This can be modeled
like a spring-mass system with masses connected in series such as the next figure.
Fig. 8Spring-mass system of multiple masses connected in series with spring constants (k0, k1, etc).
In a spring series system, the spring constant equivalent (keq) can be found knowing the spring constant values of each
spring in the system [
8
]:
(3.1)
It is assumed that there is uniformity such that the spring constant between each mass is constant. Thus, if each unit
is a spring constant (k0), then the equivalent spring constant is based on the number (n) of springs with this constant:
(3.2)
The spring constant (k0) is now determined for the smallest length, which is the radius of the mass (Planck length
lP). The number of these spring lengths for hydrogen is the Bohr radius divided by Planck length. Then, Eq. 2.3 is
used to determine the equivalent k value for the system, based on Coulomb’s constant. The values from Eqs. 3.3 and
3.4 are then substituted into Eq. 3.2 to yield the value of k0.
(3.3)
(3.4)
(3.5)
Knowing the unit spring constant value (k0), energy values can be calculated if the number of springs (n) in the system
is also known. It can be calculated by dividing measured distance (r) by the Planck length:
10
(3.6)
The equivalent spring constant is now replaced for springs in series:
(3.7)
The final equation for the energy of a series of connected masses becomes:
(3.8)
Eq. 3.8 is used to calculate the energies at the four distances placed in Table 1. The spring constant value for individual
springs, k0, is found in Eq. 3.5, and the number of springs (n) uses Eq. 3.6. All energy values are found to be equal
to the calculations from previous methods. Electron-based calculations use the fine structure constant again.
(3.9)
(3.10)
Stored and Kinetic Energy
In the previous sound wave example, three experiments are explained that measure motion, light and weight. Each
of these are based on energy, which may change forms, but is always conserved.
In a spring-mass system, a mass on a spring experiences harmonic motion. Its displacement is charted as a sinusoidal
wave over time. When a mass reaches maximum displacement, it stops and returns. At this time, there is no kinetic
energy but its potential energy is at a max. This is illustrated in the next figure and then mathematically in Eq. 3.11.
11
Fig. 9 – Simple harmonic motion and the relation of velocity (v) and displacement (x). [
9
]
(3.11)
Similar to previous equations, energy calculations in this paper assume a mass that expands and contracts, returning
to equilibrium. Or, it may also be thought of as two waves traveling in opposite directions. This equation becomes:
(3.12)
When replacing mass with Planck mass (mP), velocity with the speed of light (c), the spring constant with the unit
spring constant (k0) and amplitude as Planck charge (qP), it is found that all are equal to the Planck energy (EP).
(3.13)
This shows the relationship between stored energy and kinetic energy.
Stored Energy
In one of three experiments to measure energy described earlier, energy is contained in a volume and measured by
weighing it. Particles, such as the electron and proton, and the atoms that they form are measured as energy or mass.
It is stored energy, as particles like the electron may annihilate and release their energy in photons. Earlier, this stored
energy was described as standing waves, where there is motion but no net propagation of energy. The average
displacement (x) is zero.
From Eq. 3.12, and also illustrated in Fig. 9, when x=0, v is max. At this point, it reaches a maximum velocity of
the speed of light (c).
(3.14)
Kinetic Energy (as a Force)
In another experiment to measure energy, the motion of a nearby object can be calculated as a force, such as the ping
pong ball moving away from the speaker due to sound waves. Energy is force over distance. In particles, this force
is calculated as the electric force repelling or attracting particles and calculated by Coulomb’s law.
From Eq. 3.12, and also illustrated in Fig. 9, when v=0, x is at its max. This is the maximum displacement amplitude
(A). The next two equations are the energy of the spring-mass system and spring constant from earlier in this section.
Eq. 3.17 replaces amplitude with the elementary charge, which has been used for all the electron-based calculations.
This is substituted to become Eq. 3.18.
(3.15)
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(3.16)
(3.17)
(3.18)
Eq. 3.18 uses the Bohr radius (rh), calculating the Coulomb energy at this distance. However, it is more commonly
expressed as a force (F), which is energy divided by distance. Eq. 3.19 is the force of two particles at a distance of the
Bohr radius. When distance (r) is variable, and charge (q) is the summation of elementary charges, it is more
commonly known as Coulomb’s Law (Eq. 3.20).
(3.19)
(3.20)
Kinetic Energy (as a Photon)
In a third experiment to measure energy, light is captured. In fact, any electromagnetic wave, not just light, can be
captured. Radio waves, light, gamma rays, etc are all transverse waves of different frequencies (f). Eq. 3.12 will be
used again as the starting point, but for half the energy. As explained earlier, photon energies are half the energy
values at a distance from nucleus. It is given notation Et for transverse energy. The spring constant is substituted
using Eq. 3.16 and amplitude (A) is substituted with the Planck charge and fine structure constant, consistent with all
electron-based calculations in this paper. Finally, Coulomb’s constant is replaced from Eq. 2.7.
(3.21)
(3.22)
(3.23)
The previous energy value is the Rydberg unit of energy (2.18 x 10-18 joules), which is the ionization energy of a photon
from hydrogen’s ground state (1s). This is also half the value of the energy placed in Table 1 for hydrogen.
13
Rearranging these terms derives the Planck constant (h), separated in Eq. 3.24 to the left in parentheses. The
remaining terms on the right are frequency (f), which is the variable in the Planck relation. This is the energy equation
for light and the electromagnetic spectrum (E=hf).
(3.24)
(3.25)
(3.26)
The equations that model the behavior of three experiments for motion, light and weight can be derived from a
spring-mass system. Nevertheless, there are still issues. There is only one variable in Eq. 3.24. If it was only distance
that determined the photon’s energy, it would have been easier to predict and model quantum behaviors.
4. Wave Energy (1D)
When two or more waves collide and combine, constructive wave interference occurs changing the resultant
amplitude of the collective wave. It is this property of waves that is missing in the equation for frequency in Eq. 3.24.
It is also important for the creation of particles, which will be explained in Section 5.
Wavelength is another variable property of waves. Transverse wavelengths and frequencies may vary based on the
speed at which a particle vibrates. And longitudinal wavelengths may vary when a particle is in motion, experiencing
the Doppler effect and responsible for relativistic behaviors. It is for this reason that wave equations are preferred.
A simple equation for the energy of a wave in a volume (V) with a given density (r), wave speed (c) and amplitude
(A) that declines with distance (r) is shown in Eq. 4.1:
(4.1)
Earlier in Eq. 2.9, the magnetic constant was derived and shown to be a linear density, with units of kg/m. This
represents the density between two particles, as it is a property that was determined from measuring the forces of
these particles. Fig. 10 illustrates two particles separated a distance r, and the volume between them as a pyramid with
height (r) and base width and length (re). The pyramid shape is often used to describe forces and how such force
decreases with distance. In this case, it acts upon the electron at distance and the base of the pyramid is the electron’s
radius. Note the pyramid base should be 2 times radius, but it corrects for the Planck charge which is 2 times amplitude and they both
cancel in the upcoming Eq. 4.5.
14
Fig. 10 – Linear density derived from a volume (V) of pyramid shape with length r and base/width re.
The density calculated from Eq. 3, using the Planck mass and the volume of hydrogen is shown again in Eq. 4.2.
Now, the linear density from the magnetic constant is converted to density by dividing the volume of the electron,
since this constant is based on electron calculations. Note that it is divided by the square of the electron radius, not cube, since
the magnetic constant is already a linear density with one electron radius accounted for in the constant.
(4.2)
(4.3)
Both density values, when rounded, are 4 x 1022 (kg/m3). This is also the same density derived a third way in energy
wave equations, although a more refined value of 3.86 x 1022 is used for density when considering g-factors [
10
].
Given that the magnetic constant is a linear density, a special volume is used as described in Fig. 10. The volume of
the pyramid is:
(4.4)
Next, the 1D wave equation from Eq. 4.1 is used, then substituted for density (Eq. 4.3) and volume (Eq. 4.4). After
simplifying, it becomes the single mass spring equation (Eq. 2.4), showing that the equations are identical.
(4.5)
As the equations are equal, the values are also the same and placed into Table 1.
5. Wave Energy (3D)
While the wave and spring-mass equations work for forces and photons in one-dimension, it doesn’t adequately
describe particles. It works for forces between two particles because a one-dimensional line can be drawn between
particles. However, particles are three-dimensional objects.
15
Fig. 11 describes a spherical particle, generating energy flowing as waves with a defined wavelength and an amplitude
that decreases from the center. It includes a transition between standing waves and traveling waves, for a definition
of a particle’s stored energy boundary. Energy continues beyond this boundary as kinetic energy that may cause
motion of nearby particles or create photons from their transverse vibration.
These longitudinal waves have an amplitude (A) that may change based on constructive wave interference with other
particles, and particle motion is an effect of moving the wave center to equalize amplitude. The longitudinal wave
has a constant wavelength, but it may change based on motion, consistent with the Doppler effect [
11
].
Fig. 11Wave energy in a spherical volume with variable amplitude (A) and a wavelength (l) that changes with motion.
The 1D version of wave energy from the previous section is shown again and compared to the 3D version in Eq. 5.2:
(5.1)
(5.2)
The three-dimensional creation of the equation includes wave amplitude (A) in three dimensions (A3). It decreases
with distance, but now wavelength is considered. One of the squares in which wavelength is included becomes the
in-wave frequency (f=c/l) and the other component of the square is the out-wave frequency. Each in-wave and out-
wave has a three-dimensional amplitude decreasing at the square of distance. The volume is now spherical.
(5.3)
One of the benefits of using the Wave Energy (3D) equations is calculating particle energies beyond the electron.
Energies from the neutrino to the Higgs boson were calculated using a method that considers constructive wave
interference for multiple wave centers (K) combined at a core, much like how protons (and neutrons) combine at the
core of an atomic nucleus. Due to similarities with atomic elements, the findings were linearized and then organized
into a periodic structure and reported in a separate paper [
12
].
Without reproducing all the steps in that paper, the derivation of Eq. 5.2 into an equation that calculates the energy
of standing, longitudinal waves is found in Eq. 5.4. All constants are placed in the Appendix. The only variable in
the equation is the count of wave centers (K) at the core of the particle. The energy of a single wave center (Ev) is
calculated in Eq. 5.5. The energy of the electron (Ee) is found with a count of 10 wave centers.
16
(5.4)
(5.5)
(5.6)
In Section 4, it was found that 1D wave and 1D spring-mass equations were equal. This is not surprising since a
speaker creates sound waves. So, it follows that 3D waves and 3D spring-mass systems should also be equal. To
model electron-based behaviors using a 3D spring-mass system, a spring constant (k3) was determined. Note this k has
different units than a 1D spring constant k.
(5.7)
Because it is used to calculate energies based on the electron, the elementary charge is used. This equation is the only
method that does not work to calculate the Planck energy in Table 1. The equation for this method is:
(5.8)
(5.9)
Eq 5.8 is used to calculate the electron’s rest energy in Eq. 5.9. The same steps were taken using the equation to solve
for the energies of hydrogen and helium and all results were placed into Table 1. All values for all methods used in
this paper are equal.
Conclusion
As implausible as it could be that sound exists without air, it is equally strange to consider that electromagnetic waves
are explained as waves traveling through space in which no medium exists. Empty space. Nevertheless, the
mathematics were shown to be the same when modeling empty space as radiating energy, as a massive particle
vibrating in a spring-mass system, or as multiple particles vibrating as a spring-mass or calculated as the formation of
waves. Sound waves were used as a physical model to explain this behavior but the values for air molecule size and
mass were replaced with subatomic scales. The equations are equal regardless of values. Thus, shouldn’t it be possible
that the universe could be filled with Planck-sized objects that vibrate in harmonic motion to create waves?
17
At the very least, it has been shown that subatomic particles and the atoms which they form can be modeled with
classical mechanics, by using 5 different methods in this paper. This finding is significant because of the simplification
of all objects in the universe, from the smallest of particles to the largest of galaxies, obeying the same laws of physics.
It leads to the possibility of computer simulations that can model the behavior of particles and atoms. While this
paper calculates energies of atoms for the first two elements – hydrogen and helium the framework has also been
set for the calculations of atoms beyond helium in a separate paper. Furthermore, the framework has been set for
the calculations of particle energies beyond the electron.
It is the conclusion of this paper that wave equations that model three-dimensional spherical particles best represents
the true nature of the subatomic realm, not only for their ability to calculate the energies of electron-based experiments
found in Table 1, but also because natural properties of waves explain relativistic effects and quantum behaviors.
Variable wavelengths allow for classical mechanics equations to explain relativity as a change in wavelength for a
particle in motion and constructive wave interference that affects wave amplitude accounts for quantum behaviors.
18
Appendix
Constants
The following constants are used in this paper, separated by the distances used in energy calculations, classical
constants (CODATA values), wave constants found in Energy Wave Theory (EWT) and other constants calculated
in this paper.
Symbol
Definition
Value (units)
Distances
lP
Planck length
1.6162 x 10-35 (m)
re
Electron classical radius
2.8179 x 10-15 (m)
rh
Hydrogen 1s radius (Bohr radius – a0)
5.2918 x 10-11 (m)
rhe
Helium 1s radius
3.0 x 10-11 (m)a
Classical Constants
c
Wave velocity (sp eed of l igh t)
299,792,458 (m/s)
mP
Planck mass
2.1765 x 10-8 (kg)
EP
Planck energy
1.9561 x 109 (kg*m2/s2)
ke
Coulomb constant
8.9876 x 109 (kg*m/s2)b
µ0
Magnetic constant
1.2566 x 10-6 (kg/m)b
qP
Planck charge
1.8756 x 10-18 (m)b
ee
Elementary charge
1.6022 x 10-19 (m)b
ae
Fine structure constant
0.00729735
e
Euler’s number
2.71828
Wave Const ants
Al
Amplitude (longitudinal)
9.215405708 x 10-19 (m)
λl
Wavel ength (longitu dinal)
2.854096501 x 10-17 (m)
ρ
Density (aether)
3.859764540 x 1022 (kg/m3)
Other Constants
mg
Granule mass
1.18936x 10-80 (kg)
N
Number granules in hydrogen
1.82995 x 1072
k0
Unit spring constant (1D)
5.56081 x 1044 (kg/s2)
k3
Unit spring constant (3D)
1.36395 x 1085 (kg/m3*s2)
aHelium 1s radius uses 30pm instead of an estimated 31pm to fit experimental data [
13
].
bCorrected units when units of Coulombs (C) is replaced with distance (meters).
Table 2Values and units of constants used in this paper
19
1
Mohr, P., Newell, D. and Taylor, B., 2014. CODATA Recommended Values of the Fundamental Physical Constants, Rev. Mod. Phys. 88,
035009.
2
White, H., White, D., 1980. Physics and Music: The Science of Musical Sound. Dover Publications, Mineola, NY.
3
Wikipedia, 2019. Standing Wave. Online: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standing_wave.
4
Wikipedia, 2020. Mechanism of Sonoluminescence. Online: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechanism_of_sonoluminescence.
5
Yee, J., Gardi, L., 2019. The Geometry of Spacetime and the Unification of the Electromagnetic, Gravitational and Strong Forces.
ResearchGate. Online: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/334316805.
6
Yee, J., 2018. Atomic Orbitals: Explained and Derived with Energy Wave Equations, Vixra.org, 1708.0146.
7
Davis, J., 2000. Mathematics of Wave Propagation. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.
8
Greiner, W., 2004, Classical Mechanics, Point Particles and Relativity. Springer-Verlay, New York, NY.
9
State University of New York, 2020. Energy in Simple Harmonic Motion. Online: https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-
osuniversityphysics/chapter/15-2-energy-in-simple-harmonic-motion/.
10
Yee, J., 2020. The Relationship of Planck Constants and Wave Constants, ResearchGate, Online:
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/338376047
11
Possel, M. 2017. Waves, motion and frequency: the Doppler effect. Einstein Online, Vol. 5. Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics,
Potsdam, Germany.
12
Yee, J., 2018. The Periodic Table of Subatomic Particles, ResearchGate, Online: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/330144517
13
Webelements, 2020. Helium Orbital Distance. Online: https://www.webelements.com/helium/atom_sizes.html
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
This paper gives the 2006 self-consistent set of values of the basic constants and conversion factors of physics and chemistry recommended by the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) for international use. Further, it describes in detail the adjustment of the values of the constants, including the selection of the final set of input data based on the results of least-squares analyses. The 2006 adjustment takes into account the data considered in the 2002 adjustment as well as the data that became available between 31 December 2002, the closing date of that adjustment, and 31 December 2006, the closing date of the new adjustment. The new data have led to a significant reduction in the uncertainties of many recommended values. The 2006 set replaces the previously recommended 2002 CODATA set and may also be found on the World Wide Web at physics.nist.gov/constants.
Physics and Music: The Science of Musical Sound
  • H White
  • D White
White, H., White, D., 1980. Physics and Music: The Science of Musical Sound. Dover Publications, Mineola, NY.
Mechanism of Sonoluminescence
  • Wikipedia
Wikipedia, 2020. Mechanism of Sonoluminescence. Online: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechanism_of_sonoluminescence.
The Geometry of Spacetime and the Unification of the Electromagnetic, Gravitational and Strong Forces. ResearchGate
  • J Yee
  • L Gardi
Yee, J., Gardi, L., 2019. The Geometry of Spacetime and the Unification of the Electromagnetic, Gravitational and Strong Forces. ResearchGate. Online: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/334316805.
Atomic Orbitals: Explained and Derived with Energy Wave Equations
  • J Yee
Yee, J., 2018. Atomic Orbitals: Explained and Derived with Energy Wave Equations, Vixra.org, 1708.0146.
The Relationship of Planck Constants and Wave Constants, ResearchGate
  • J Yee
Yee, J., 2020. The Relationship of Planck Constants and Wave Constants, ResearchGate, Online: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/338376047
Waves, motion and frequency: the Doppler effect
  • M Possel
Possel, M. 2017. Waves, motion and frequency: the Doppler effect. Einstein Online, Vol. 5. Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Potsdam, Germany.
The Periodic Table of Subatomic Particles
  • J Yee
Yee, J., 2018. The Periodic Table of Subatomic Particles, ResearchGate, Online: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/330144517