PosterPDF Available

SOCPacific's transdisciplinary research protocol based on children's drawings

Authors:
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD) - Montpellier
  • Institute of Research for Development (IRD)

Abstract

Children are often marginalized in research on local perceptions and values of the environment, and even more of marine spaces and species. Yet, as users and future managers of fisheries, they are directly concerned by issues related to their sustainability. Moreover, they not only receive, but also contribute to produce, hybridize, and circulate fisheries-related knowledge. As shown in several recent research projects and the growing scientific literature on the matter, drawings allow children to express their relationships with their environment in a playful and age-appropriate way, and are therefore a particularly relevant tool for exploring children's ecological knowledge. As part of the research project 'A Sea of Connections: Contextualizing Fisheries in the South Pacific Region' (SOCPacific, 2018-2022), we have designed a transdisciplinary protocol based on drawings made by children in order to provide innovative insights into the social values of fisheries-related places and resources.
SOCPacific’s transdisciplinary research protocol based on children’s drawings
Elodie Fache1, Stéphanie M. Carrière1, Catherine Sabinot2
1 UMR GRED, IRD Montpellier, elodie.fache@ird.fr & stephanie.carriere@ird.fr,
2 UMR Espace-Dev, IRD Nouméa, catherine.sabinot@ird.fr
With the contribution of Annette Breckwoldt, Gilbert David, Solène Delebecque, Juliette Kon Kam King, Ulamila Matairakula, Arno Pascht, Simonne Pauwels, Léa Riera, Mere Veitayaki.
Children are often marginalized in research on local perceptions and values of the environment, and even more of marine spaces
and species. Yet, as users and future managers of fisheries, they are directly concerned by issues related to their sustainability.
Moreover, they not only receive, but also contribute to produce, hybridize, and circulate fisheries-related knowledge.
As shown in several recent research projects and the growing scientific literature on the matter, drawings allow children to
express their relationships with their environment in a playful and age-appropriate way, and are therefore a particularly
relevant tool for exploring children’s ecological knowledge.
As part of the research project A Sea of Connections: Contextualizing Fisheries in the South Pacific Region (SOCPacific, 2018-
2022), we have designed a transdisciplinary protocol based on drawings made by children in order to provide innovative insights
into the social values of fisheries-related places and resources.
Terres cultivées
Brief description of SOCPacific: Brief description of the research protocol:
A Sea of Connections:
Contextualizing Fisheries in the South Pacific Region
Main objective:
Explore the large web of
social, policy and geopolitical connections
within which coastal and oceanic fishing practices occur
Three study areas in the South Pacific:
Fiji, New Caledonia, Vanuatu
Three thematic areas:
1- Social values of places and resources
2- Interwoven fishing and conservation issues
3- Fisheries and marine spatial planning
Where? In schools of our three study areas: Fiji, New Caledonia, Vanuatu
When? September 2019 March 2020
Who? Children between 9 and 14 years of age
Instruction? Draw the saltwater and what you and other people do in the saltwater
(also translated into Fijian, French and Bislama languages)
Corpus ? About 450 drawings
Organization of drawing workshops in 9 different settings:
Organization of each drawing workshop:
- Introduction by the team + distribution of drawing material
- Drawings by children (1-2 hours)
- Short face-to-face interview with each child
+ Interview with teachers and/or principals of the school concerned
The research team:
- In Fiji: Elodie Fache, Simonne Pauwels, Annette Breckwoldt, Ulamila Matairakula, Mere Veitayaki
- In New Caledonia: Elodie Fache, Catherine Sabinot, Annette Breckwoldt, Gilbert David, Solène
Delebecque, Juliette Kon Kam King, Léa Riera
- In Vanuatu: Elodie Fache, Catherine Sabinot, Arno Pascht, et al.
Fiji
Lami
(58 children)
Kadavu Island
(52 children)
Cicia Island
(44 children)
New Caledonia
Nouméa
(49 children)
Hienghène
(38 children)
Yaté
(50 children)
Vanuatu (forthcoming…)
Port-Vila
(50 children)
Village(s) near a MPA
(50 children)
Village(s) without MPA
(50 children)
For more information:
https://socpacific.net/
Afew drawings made by children in Fiji (Sept.-Nov. 2019) and in New Caledonia (Nov. 2019):
This protocol mainly aims to:
- explore children’s perceptions and values of the sea and the resources therein in the South Pacific region;
- analyze whether and how these children express (dis)connections between fishing practices and the social and
environmental contexts in which they occur;
- establish comparative perspectives (between children’s and adults’ perceptions and values, between urban and rural
settings, between SOCPacific’s three study areas, possibly between the South Pacific and other regions of the world);
- facilitate dialogue pathways between the academic world and the various stakeholders of fisheries and their management.
Fiji, Kadavu (boy, 10 years old)
New Caledonia, Yaté (boy, 12 years old)
Fiji, Kadavu (girl, 12 years old)
New Caledonia, Yaté (boy, 10 years old)
Fiji, Lami (boy, 12 years old)
New Caledonia, Yaté (boy, 10 years old)
Fiji, Cicia (girl, 12 years old) Fiji, Lami (girl, 13 years old)
New Caledonia, Hienghène (girl, 11 years old) New Caledonia, Hienghène (girl, 10 years old)
Fiji, Lami (boy, 13 years old)
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