Chapter

Nutrient Composition of Mealworm (Tenebrio molitor)

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Abstract

The mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L.) is perhaps the greatest creepy beetles feeding on stored items. Grown-up hatchling weighs about 0.2 g and is 25–35 mm long. The grown-up larvae are utilized as human sustenance in certain countries of the world. The pupa is a free-living, 12–18 mm long and of velvety white color. Mealworms begin to lay eggs 4–17 days after intercourse. The live mealworm is made out of 20% protein, 13% fat, 2% fiber, and 62% moisture, while the dried mealworm is made out of 53% protein, 28% fat, 6% fiber, and 5% moisture. Mealworms are anything but difficult to breed and encourage, and have a profitable protein profile. Consequently, they are delivered modernly as feed for pets and zoo animals, including winged animals, reptiles, little well evolved animals, batrachians, and fish. They are normally encouraged live, yet they are likewise sold canned, dried, or in powder structure.

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