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THE COLLABORATIVE PROJECT OWNER IN THEORY AND PRACTICE. EXAMPLES FROM PROJECT HALF DOUBLE

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Abstract

Top management support and the involvement of project owners in projects has been high on the agenda for a long time. Research suggests that this is more critical for project success than any other success factor. Studies show that the relationship between project owner and project manager is complex characterized by information asymmetry and potential mistrust. Studies also show that top managers may actually be reluctant to play an active role during the project life cycle. In this paper, we examine how the involvement of project owners unfolds in the project process, when given explicit attention in six projects in six different companies. We use data from Project Half Double, which is a Danish project management initiative intended at enhancing performance in projects. The paper shows that three of the organizations seem to develop efficient collaboration between project owner and project, while three other projects struggle to make this happen due to the project owners' lack of time and focus.

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Project Half Double. Addendum: Current Results for Phase 1
  • P Svejvig
  • A G Rode
  • S H Frederiksen
Svejvig, P., Rode, A. G., & Frederiksen, S. H. (2017). Project Half Double. Addendum: Current Results for Phase 1 January 2017. Can be downloaded from: http://www.projecthalfdouble.dk/en/research/