Article

Thriving at Work: A Mentoring-Moderated Process Linking Task Identity and Autonomy to Job Satisfaction

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Abstract

Building on two studies, this research explored thriving at work by considering task identity and autonomy as its antecedents and job satisfaction as its outcome, with a focus on the moderating role of mentoring. Through a three-wave survey conducted among 140 Chinese university students with volunteer work, Study 1 found that task identity and autonomy positively predicted thriving, which in turn was positively related to job satisfaction. This mediation effect of thriving was verified in Study 2 with a sample of 522 Australian student nurses undertaking a clinical placement job. Supporting the moderating role of mentoring, Study 2 also found that the effect of task identity on thriving as well as its indirect effect on job satisfaction via thriving became weaker when the quality of mentoring increased. These results not only offer important theoretical insights by confirming relatively new antecedents of thriving and their boundary condition (i.e., mentoring), but also generate practical implications regarding how to use motivating job characteristics and relational resources to foster positive individuals with enhanced well-being at work.

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... Supporting this viewpoint, Jiang et al. (2021) found a positive relationship between thriving and career satisfaction. Regarding the effect of thriving on job satisfaction, Jiang et al. (2020) argue that both components of thriving prompt employees to be immersed at work. Specifically, vitality enables them to develop and use job resources to create favorable work environments, while learning helps nurture their perceptions of capability and efficacy. ...
... Specifically, vitality enables them to develop and use job resources to create favorable work environments, while learning helps nurture their perceptions of capability and efficacy. Such functions of vitality and learning assist with maintaining positive feelings and attitudes such as job satisfaction (Jiang et al., 2020). These arguments are supported by empirical findings that thriving enhances job satisfaction (Jiang et al., 2020;Kleine et al., 2019). ...
... Such functions of vitality and learning assist with maintaining positive feelings and attitudes such as job satisfaction (Jiang et al., 2020). These arguments are supported by empirical findings that thriving enhances job satisfaction (Jiang et al., 2020;Kleine et al., 2019). ...
Article
Based on a three-wave survey of 223 full-time workers, this study investigates how trait conscientiousness affects career satisfaction and job satisfaction and the boundary condition of these effects. We found that conscientiousness fostered career and job satisfaction through enabling thriving at work. Results also revealed that the impact of conscientiousness on thriving at work, and subsequently on career and job satisfaction, was stronger when individuals received less supervisor support. These findings advance our theoretical and practical knowledge of how personality traits and situational factors jointly impact on employee wellbeing.
... For example, an 8-week mindfulness training intervention increased thriving among physicians (Fendel et al., 2020). Greater task identity also induces more thriving (but less so among mentees in high-quality mentorships; Jiang et al., 2020). Receiving coaching can facilitate thriving via increased psychological capital (Iverson, 2016), social support, and skill development (e.g., Raza et al., 2017). ...
... Thriving is positively related to work engagement (Ren et al., 2015), affective organizational commitment (Walumbwa et al., 2018), and job satisfaction (Jiang et al., 2020) and negatively related to turnover intention (Chang et al., 2020). Thriving workers also tend to exhibit more career self-management, like upskilling, feedback-seeking (Paterson et al., 2014;Shan, 2016), adaptability (Jiang, 2017), culminating in enhanced career resilience (Jiang et al., 2021), commitment, engagement, and satisfaction (Jiang et al., 2020). ...
... Thriving is positively related to work engagement (Ren et al., 2015), affective organizational commitment (Walumbwa et al., 2018), and job satisfaction (Jiang et al., 2020) and negatively related to turnover intention (Chang et al., 2020). Thriving workers also tend to exhibit more career self-management, like upskilling, feedback-seeking (Paterson et al., 2014;Shan, 2016), adaptability (Jiang, 2017), culminating in enhanced career resilience (Jiang et al., 2021), commitment, engagement, and satisfaction (Jiang et al., 2020). Noticeably, thriving older workers (55 years and above) report higher levels of perceived employability (Hennekam, 2017), suggesting more positive self/career assessments. ...
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Thriving at work is a notable construct given its role in individual health and developmental outcomes. According to the Socially Embedded Model of Thriving (SEMT), individuals thrive at work when embedded in environments that support agentic behaviors and can self-sustain this state through positive spirals of agentic behaviors, resources, and thriving. The SEMT is inherently multilevel, yet there are two unarticulated but critical multilevel issues in existing scholarship: a paucity of research reflecting these multilevel features of the SEMT and an incipient multilevel conceptualization of thriving that has little theoretical justification. As a catalyst for progress, we present an integrative review drawing from the SEMT and other supplementary theoretical perspectives to define a multilevel conceptualization of thriving at work. Through this lens, we organize, synthesize, and evaluate the body of evidence, integrating the multilevel view of thriving within established scholarship. To substantiate our framework theoretically, we articulate how lower-level processes unfold to develop higher-level collective manifestations of thriving at work. We identify opportunities for theoretical and empirical advancement, coupled with specific, actionable recommendations, to deepen a multilevel conceptualization of thriving. Altogether, we advance thriving at work as a multilevel construct meaningful at three levels - individuals, dyads, collectives.
... Richard Hackman andGreg Oldham in 1976 (Hackman andOldham, 1980) encompasses three psychological states (meaningful work experience, accountability in job and work outcome knowledge) and mostly assumed by employees to improve their performance and maintain internal motivation (Ababneh and Hackett, 2019;Ozturk et al., 2014 &Sulistyo andSuhartini, 2019). The Job characteristics model proposes that works should be designed for intrinsic job-related components (e.g., skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy, and feedback (Ababneh and Hackett, 2019;Jiang et al., 2020;Stoermer et al., 2020;Sulistyo andSuhartini, 2019 &Wegman et al., 2018). Hackman & Oldham (1975) described skill variety as the degree to which a job requires a variety of activities to carry out the work, which involves the use of a number of different skills and talents of the employee. ...
... Where, task identity refers to the degree to which the job requires an individual to complete a whole task from beginning to end, and not just a portion of it (Blanz, 2017;Hackman & Oldham, 1980;Jiang et al., 2020;Ozturk et al., 2014), and he experiences more meaningfulness if he works on the entire process (Blanz, 2017). Besides, task identity refers to the completion of a "whole" and identifiable piece of work with visible outcomes (Keena et al., 2018;Khalil, 2017;Österberg & Rydstedt, 2018). ...
... Besides, task identity refers to the completion of a "whole" and identifiable piece of work with visible outcomes (Keena et al., 2018;Khalil, 2017;Österberg & Rydstedt, 2018). However, task identity helps an individual to learn, comprehend, and be acquainted with a task and its connection to other tasks that leads to an integrated knowledge of that job (Jiang et al., 2020). Hackman and Oldham (1975) have defined task significance as "the degree to which a job has a substantial impact on the lives or work of other people-whether in the immediate organization or in the external environment." ...
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The focus of this research is to measure the job satisfaction of young faculty members in the universities by applying the Job Characteristics Model (JCM). This is an empirical study in which primary information has been collected from 129 faculty members who have less than three years of teaching experience in different public and private universities in Bangladesh. The respondents are selected by using convenience sampling method and information was gathered with a structured questionnaire sent through the Google Form and a printed copy. To depict the relationships between job satisfaction and five dimensions of the Job Characteristics Model, multiple regression analysis was conducted. The study reveals that task variety, feedback, and autonomy have significant impacts on job satisfaction. The findings of this study show that the job satisfaction of young faculty members can be improved by enhancing task variety, giving autonomy, and providing continuous feedback on their performance.
... Thriving individuals are a source of competitive advantage for organizations (Abid et al., 2018). Whereas, the direct influence of thriving on job satisfaction is still scarce in the literature (Jiang et al., 2020). Job satisfaction (the extent to which employees feel about their job) has received substantial attention of researchers as well as managers (Qasim et al., 2012). ...
... We speculate that thriving will be positively linked with job satisfaction. This expectation has received strong support from the recent theoretical as well empirically studies (Jiang et al., 2020;Porath et al., 2012), in which they illustrated that thriving is a strong contributor to job satisfaction. So, based on the above discussion and COR theory, thriving employees create the surpluses of resources in the organizational setting, and finite amount of resources (material, social and psychological) enables them to show a positive attitude towards their job such as job satisfaction. ...
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Given the complexity of employee attitudes toward work, organizations continue to devote their attention to work related attitudes, especially employee job satisfaction. The present study draws on Conservation of Resource Theory (COR) to highlight that the effect of Perceived Organizational Support (POS) on job satisfaction depends on thriving at work. The study also proposes that proactive personality moderates the positive relationship between POS and thriving at work This study tested on a sample of 936 Pakistani employees over a two-waves (T1 and T2), over a period of one month. We were able to find support for the existence of a positive relationship between POS and job satisfaction and thriving at work mediates the above relationship. The results also established that the positive influence of POS on job satisfaction through thriving at work increase as proactivity reduce in the employees. The practical implication of the study proposes that organizations should provide employees with a supportive work to improve their job satisfaction.
... Recent studies also indicate that thriving employees are more likely to engage in takingcharge behavior, which can bring constructive change for organizations . Besides the practical benefits, many scholars regard thriving at work as a mediator that can explain the impact of individual characteristics (e.g., Alikaj et al., 2020), leadership (e.g., Niessen et al., 2017;Xu et al., 2017;Li et al., 2019), and organizational contextual factors (e.g., Chang and Busser, 2020;Jiang et al., 2020) on favorable organizational outcomes (e.g., creativity, job satisfaction, and taking charge). For example, Hildenbrand et al.'s (2018) empirical study demonstrated that transformational leadership can decrease burnout via enhancing thriving at work. ...
... For example, it has been shown that authentic leadership (Xu et al., 2017), empowering leadership (Li et al., 2016), service leadership (Jo et al., 2020), and transformational leadership (Lin et al., 2020) are all positively related to employees' thriving. The third part of the research explores the effect of job and organizational factors (e.g., Prem et al., 2017;Jiang et al., 2020;Strecker et al., 2020). Along with this research stream, some scholars demonstrated that job autonomy (Strecker et al., 2020), workplace civility (Abid et al., 2018), and organizational justice (Kim and Beehr, 2020) are key variables in fostering employees' thriving. ...
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Employees who thrive contribute to their organization’s competitive advantage and sustainable performance. The aim of this study was to explore how employees’ thriving is shaped by their leaders’ behavior. Drawing on social learning theory, we examined the relationship between perceived leader’s helping behavior and employees’ thriving. Positing voice behavior as a mediator and perceived leader’s role overload as a moderator, we constructed a moderated mediation model. Using 205 daily data points from 51 employees in various industries, we found that perceived leader’s helping behavior had a positive effect on employees’ thriving at work and that employees’ voice behavior mediated this effect. With the increase of perceived leader’s role overload, the positive relationship between perceived leader’s helping behavior and employees’ voice behavior as well as the indirect effect of perceived leader’s helping behavior on employees’ thriving via employees’ voice behavior were increasingly strong. The findings of our study have implications for research on employees’ thriving at work, leaders’ helping behavior, and social learning theory. There are also practical implications for the behavior of leaders who experience role overload.
... Niessen et al., 2017;Paterson et al., 2014). As a desirable subjective experience, thriving empowers employees to grow in a positive direction, enabling them to adapt and perform effectively at work (Jiang et al., 2020;Kabat-Farr & Cortina, 2017;Spreitzer et al., 2005). A critical benefit resulting from thriving is employee creativity, defined as the generation of ideas or solutions that are novel and valuable to organizations (Amabile, 1996;Zhou & Shalley, 2003). ...
... Although these studies have facilitated our knowledge regarding contextual enablers of thriving (e.g. transformational leadership, job autonomy, and an involvement climate) (Jiang et al., 2020;Kleine et al., 2019;Wallace et al., 2016), a deeper and fuller understanding of the contextual influence on thriving is significantly impeded (e.g. Kleine et al., 2019;Rahaman et al., 2021) because the existing literature has largely neglected the contextual barriers to thriving. ...
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Drawing on the socially embedded model of thriving and conservation of resources theory, we explore the negative effect of workplace ostracism on employee thriving. We model organization‐based self‐esteem (OBSE) as a moderator and extend our examination to the downstream implications of thriving for employee creativity. Using a scenario‐based experiment (Study 1) with 387 working adults, we find that workplace ostracism is more likely to prevent workers with higher levels of OBSE from thriving at work. This finding is verified in Study 2, in which we use multiwave, multisource data collected from 207 employees and their supervisors to test the proposed model. The results further show that for employees with higher levels of OBSE, thriving at work is more likely to mediate the relationship between workplace ostracism and employee creativity. These findings provide important practical implications for fostering employee thriving and promoting creativity in the workplace by managing workplace ostracism.
... Job autonomy is one of the job resources that can help employees cope with job demands (Van Yperen et al., 2016) by allowing them to make their own decisions about when and how to respond to the demands (Gao & Jiang, 2019). Employees who have greater job autonomy are likely to feel more free from external constraints (Deci et al., 1989), to handle work stress better (Jiang et al., 2020;Schiff & Leip, 2019), and to experience less work burnout (Ahuja et al., 2007;Bakker et al., 2005), all of which also lead to higher job satisfaction (Yeh, 2015;Yucel, 2018). ...
... To create an enjoyable workplace, managers should pay close attention to the characteristics of the job and to how these characteristics may also improve employees' job satisfaction (Jiang et al., 2020). In particular, managers should consider job autonomy. ...
Article
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Overwork is a common phenomenon worldwide. Although previous studies have found that long working hours can cause physical and mental health problems in employees, the nature of the relationship between working hours and job satisfaction remains little understood. We have theorised that there is a curvilinear association between working hours and job satisfaction, and tested this hypothesis. A total of 771 adult Chinese employees submitted self-reported measures of working hours, job satisfaction, and job autonomy. The results show that working hours have an inverted U-shaped association with job satisfaction. Work scheduling autonomy and decision-making autonomy moderate this relationship. Here we present our data and discuss their theoretical and practical implications. Supplementary information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s12144-021-02463-3.
... Our study distinctively finds that the environment of care, respect, and value act as a premise for bonding between employees and organizations, which further nurtures a quality of exchange relationship (through cognitive an affective trust). Prior studies reported that job autonomy results in numerous beneficial outcomes i.e. job satisfaction, thriving at work, employee creativity, and perceived organizational support (Allen et al., 2008;Jiang et al., 2020;Li, 2018;Sia & Appu, 2015). In nutshell, our findings are consistent with existing body of knowledge as our study reported that threedimensional job autonomy has positive effects on twodimensional trust which in turn boosts ECS. ...
... The empirical investigation of the said linkage is a pioneer to our knowledge and will extend the existing body of knowledge. Previously, overall autonomy has been conceptualized in promoting different organizational outcomes for example job satisfaction, work performance (Dysvik & Kuvaas, 2011;Jiang et al., 2020). The present work is unique as to examine the three-dimensional autonomy based on work of (Breaugh, 1985;Morgeson & Humphrey, 2006) in relation to ECS. ...
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The current study aimed at investigating the role of three dimensions of autonomy (work method autonomy, decision-making autonomy, and work scheduling autonomy) in promoting extra-role customer service behavior (ECS) based on social exchange theory. We also propose the mediating role of cognitive trust and affective trust between three-dimensional autonomy and ECS. Dyadic data (supervisor-employee) was collected through the survey method from front-line hotel employees (N = 255) in China. The results through structural equation modeling (SEM) demonstrate that three forms of autonomy have positive effects on two-dimensional trust and ECS. Moreover, two-dimensional trust mediated the relationship between the three dimensions of autonomy and ECS. The results also highlight theoretical and managerial implications for autonomy, trust, and ECS in the hospitality context.
... As an affective aspect, vitality refers to the sense of aliveness, while learning as a cognitive aspect is regarded as acquiring knowledge and skills and applying it to work. The socially embedded thriving model suggests that unit contextual factors enable agentic work behaviors that act as an engine of thriving (Jiang et al., 2020b). Organizational justice is a contextual factor involving the individuals' fairness of perception related to the distribution of rewards and resources, and to the procedures involved in allocating resources (Colquitt, 2001). ...
... The employees satisfy this obligation by exhibiting prosocial behaviors directed at customers by exhibiting extra-role behavior (Wu & Chen, 2019). As the Chinese hotel industry is growing rapidly , researchers have suggested to managers of Chinese hotels that valuing their employees is vital (Jiang et al., 2020b). Thus, managers should be aware of ways to promote their employees' thriving by strengthening their perception of fairness and making them feel that they are valuable to the organization. ...
Article
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This study tests a model of three-dimensional organizational justice (i.e., distributive, procedural, and interactional) and extra-role customer service, with thriving at work as a mediator, based on social exchange theory. We also explore how servant leadership moderates the linkages between these organizational justice dimensions and thriving. Our analysis of data collected from 292 employee-supervisor dyads in the hotel industry affirms that organizational justice dimensions are positively associated with thriving, and thriving is positively related to extra-role customer service. The analysis also corroborates that thriving mediates the associations among distributive, procedural, interactional justice, and extra-role customer service. Moreover, servant leadership strengthens the positive relationships of all three organizational justice dimensions and thriving at work. Building on the analysis results, our study discusses theoretical contributions and practical implications related to the perception of justice in enabling thriving and illustrates how social exchange shapes employee behavior.
... Finally, role modeling occurs when mentors display the appropriate values, attitudes, skills, and behaviors that the protégé might want to emulate (Kram, 1983). Although many studies have examined the unique effects of the different mentoring functions on protégés' career outcomes and work attitudes (Allen et al., 2004), we focus on the integrated concept of mentoring support, as suggested by recent studies (Jiang et al., 2020). This is because research shows that protégés do not always clearly differentiate the functions of mentoring, and mentors may vary the types of support they provide to their protégés over time to match specific situations (Eby et al., 2008). ...
... In line with recent studies (e.g. Den Hartog et al., 2020;Jiang et al., 2020), we also report the index of moderated mediation (Hayes, 2015), which was statistically significant (index = 0.07, SE = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.03, 0.13), further confirming that the indirect effect of perceiving a calling on team member proactivity via living out a calling varies significantly depending on mentoring. Our moderation results thus suggest that the direction of the mediated effect is different under high versus low levels of mentoring (positive versus negative), and it is thus not the strength of the moderation effect that matters. ...
Article
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With the growing interest in the joint effects of individual and contextual factors in predicting team member proactivity, this paper examines why and when pursuing one’s career calling can lead to team member proactivity. Drawing on the Work as a Calling Theory, we propose that “living out a calling” explains why employees’ perceived career calling positively relates to team member proactivity, and especially when the employee receives high levels of mentoring support. Our hypotheses are tested using a multi‐source and time‐lagged study design with a sample of 296 dyads of Chinese employees and their direct supervisors. We found support for the mediating role of living out a calling (Time 2) in the positive relationship between perceiving a calling (Time 1) and team member proactivity (Time 3). Mentoring (Time 2) moderated the perceiving a calling and living out a calling link such that when employees received more mentoring, the relationship was positive, whereas under lower levels of mentoring, the relationship was negative. Similarly, the indirect relationship between perceiving a calling and team member proactivity through living out a calling was positive at higher levels of mentoring, but the relationship was negative at lower levels of mentoring.
... Initially it was developed to study how job characteristics influence job satisfaction, and the mediating effect of the three main critical psychological states, namely experienced meaningfulness of work, experienced responsibility for work outcomes, and knowledge [13,14]. However, wide application of the model has shown that job characteristics have an influence not only on the job satisfaction, but also on the individual job outcomes and performance [22], thriving [23], responsibility [24], empowerment and organizational commitment ...
... The variable consists of three items: "I am satisfied with my position in the team"; "My work is satisfactory"; "I feel satisfied with my role in the organization". The question was based on Jiang et al. [99]. ...
Article
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The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the mental health of employees. Deterioration of the well-being of workers is also caused by changes in the working environment. Remote working can affect both social interactions and job satisfaction. The purpose of the study is to examine what factors influence job satisfaction in the context of remote work caused by a pandemic. The study analyses whether employee relations and interpersonal trust are related to the level of perceived job satisfaction. The investigation started with a literature review and then research hypotheses have been formulated. Based on an empirical study, carried out on a sample of 220 IT employees during the pandemic, an analysis of the mediating role of trust in links between employee relations and perceived job satisfaction was conducted. The current study found that positive employee relations contribute to the level of job satisfaction. Additionally, trust is an important factor that mediates these relationships. Based on the results of the research, it was possible to describe the mechanism of shaping a supportive work environment during a pandemic.
... Several taxonomies of knowledge types that represent varying degrees of knowledge complexity (e.g. know-what, know-how, know-when and know-why; Alavi and Leidner, 2001;Jiang et al., 2020) exist that could be used to further understand the motivational forces involved in sharing and receiving different types of knowledge. ...
Article
Purpose: Knowledge exchange between older and younger employees enhances the collective memory of an organization and therefore contributes to its business success. In this study, we take a motivational perspective to better understand why older and younger employees share and receive knowledge with and from each other. Specifically, we focus on generativity striving–the motivation to teach, train, and guide others–as well as development striving–the motivation to grow, increase competence, and master something new–and argue that both motives need to be considered to fully understand intergenerational knowledge exchange. Design/methodology/approach: We take a dyadic approach to disentangle how older employees’ knowledge sharing is linked to their younger colleagues’ knowledge receiving and vice versa. We applied an actor-partner interdependence model based on survey data from 145 age-diverse coworker dyads to test our hypotheses. Findings: Results showed that older and younger employees’ generativity striving affected their knowledge sharing, which in turn predicted their colleagues’ knowledge receiving. Moreover, we found that younger employees were more likely to receive knowledge that their older colleagues shared with them when they scored higher (vs. lower) on development striving. Originality: By studying the age-specific dyadic cross-over between knowledge sharing and knowledge receiving, this research adds to the knowledge exchange literature. We challenge the current age-blind view on knowledge exchange motivation and provide novel insights in the interplay of motivational forces involved in knowledge exchange between older and younger employees.
... Examples of job resources are autonomy and social support. 1 Autonomy can help individuals to have flexibility and freedom when they work, improving the level and depth of their job-related knowledge. 8 The JD-R theory cannot only focus on employee wellbeing (e.g., work engagement), but also predict organizational citizenship behavior. 9 Job resources can have a positive impact on job performance through work engagement based on the motivational process. 1 Keyko et al found that job autonomy positively related to work engagement, leading to positive outcomes among nurses. ...
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Background: Little is known about the associated factors with organizational citizenship behavior among Chinese nurses combating COVID-19. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships between autonomy, optimism, role conflict, work engagement, and organizational citizenship behavior based on moderated mediation models among Chinese nurses combating COVID-19. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on a sample of 368 nurses supporting the COVID-19 epidemic in Wuhan Leishenshan Hospital, China. According to the Job Demands-Resources model, two moderated mediation models were tested, in which autonomy/optimism was associated with organizational citizenship behavior through work engagement, when role conflict served as a moderator. Results: This current study found the mediating effect of work engagement and the moderating effect of role conflict on the relationship between autonomy/optimism and organizational citizenship behavior among nurses. Of note, nurses working in the COVID-19 epidemic viewed role conflict as challenge job demands rather than hindrance job demands. Conclusion: Based on the findings, organizational citizenship behavior can be affected by work engagement and role conflict. Nursing management is suggested to put emphasis on work engagement and role conflict among nurses supporting the COVID-19 epidemic.
... Studies that aim to capture actual learning typically use knowledge tests or task performance as indicators of learning (e.g., Niessen et al., 2012;Wielenga-Meijer et al., 2011). However, self-report measures are also frequently used (e.g., Furlan et al., 2019;Jiang et al., 2020) and seem to be reasonable indicators of learning as demonstrated by positive association between actual and perceived learning (Arbaugh & Benbunan-Finch, 2006). Nevertheless, future research may utilize objective measures, such as knowledge tests or objective performance measures, to capture learning. ...
Article
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To get their work done and achieve their daily work-related goals, employees seek knowledge from their coworkers. While the benefits of knowledge seeking have been established in the literature, we have yet to understand the potential downsides of daily knowledge seeking. We adopt a cognitive perspective to carve out the negative effect of daily knowledge seeking, while controlling for its established positive effect via perceived learning. Based on cognitive load theory, we argue that daily knowledge seeking produces intrinsic cognitive load that can hinder daily goal attainment through the experience of knowledge overload and subsequent resource depletion. However, the relational context in which knowledge seekers interact with knowledge sources represents an important contextual boundary condition. Coworker contact quality can mitigate the effect of knowledge seeking on knowledge overload because high coworker contact quality reduces extraneous (i.e., ineffective) and increases germane (i.e., productive) cognitive load that knowledge seekers experience when navigating the social interaction with knowledge sources. Under this condition, cognitive capacity is freed up and knowledge overload is less likely to occur. Based on an experience sampling study in which we collected data across 10 working days from 189 German employees, we found support for our hypotheses. An employee’s knowledge seeking had a negative indirect effect on goal attainment via knowledge overload and subsequent resource depletion, however, the downsides of daily knowledge seeking became less pronounced when coworker contact quality increased. We discuss the implications of our findings for research on knowledge seeking and resource exchange behaviors.
... From engineering perspective, they increase structural job resources including performing behaviors that aim to increase the autonomy, skill variety and other motivational characteristics of the job Hackman and Oldham, 1976). This creates a context for employees to flourish and thrive through satisfying the fundamental psychological needs of autonomy, competence and relatedness (Jiang et al., 2020;Spreitzer and Porath, 2014;Wrzesniewski and Dutton, 2001). Overall, our study extends existing research on the antecedents and mechanisms leading to thriving at work. ...
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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether perceived organizational support for strength use (POSSU) predicts employee thriving at work and the underlying mechanisms that explain this relationship. Design/methodology/approach The analysis is based on data from an online, time-lagged survey of 209 employees. Latent moderated structural equations (LMS) method was used to test the mediating role of job crafting and meaningfulness and the moderating role of core self-evaluation (CSE) in the organizational support-employee thriving relationship. Findings POSSU has a direct, positive relationship with employee thriving at work. Moreover, this relationship is fully mediated by employees' job crafting (as an agentic work behavior) and meaningfulness (as a resource produced at work). In addition, contextual factor of POSSU synergistically interacts with individual characteristic of CSE to foster thriving at work. Research limitations/implications Based on a time-lagged survey, causal relationships cannot be drawn from this study. Results point to future research that can incorporate specific types of work climate and organizational practices in a multilevel design to investigate how context at team, unit and organizational levels impact employee thriving. Practical implications The study results highlight the importance of fostering employee thriving at work by implementing organizational practices that create supportive, innovative and meaningful workplaces. Management needs to pay close attention to develop a supportive organizational climate geared to identifying, developing and utilizing employees' strengths. Originality/value This study provides theoretical explanations and empirical tests on the mechanisms linking organization support and employee thriving based on the socially embedded model of thriving.
... A range of researches reported a positive connection between university autonomy and job satisfaction (Gözükara & Çolakoğlu, 2016;Rodríguez et al., 2016). Workers that are given high university autonomy show positive consequences and have the feelings of a determined job which is obvious from their efforts, hard work, and decisions (Jiang et al., 2020). Besides, the study highlights that the high level of institutional autonomy enhances employee's positive feelings and job outcomes (Liu & Lo, 2018). ...
... Regarding interest value perception, modern education aims to develop people's career choices based on their interests [59][60][61]. Studies have found that the congruence between interests and occupation is a crucial factor affecting job satisfaction [62][63][64][65]. Further, job satisfaction can have significant effects on health, especially mental health (e.g., burnout, self-esteem, depression, anxiety) [66][67][68][69]. ...
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Research on the effect of work value perception on workers’ health, especially in emerging economies, is scarce. This study, therefore, explored how work value perception affects the physical and mental health of workers in China. We also examined the mediating role of life satisfaction in the relationship between work value perception and health. Taking a random sample of 16,890 individuals in China, we used ordered probit regression and instrumental variable ordered probit regression to test the links between work value perception and workers’ health based on existence, relatedness, and growth (ERG) theory. The results showed that work value perception significantly affected both the physical and mental health of workers; the results remained robust after solving the endogeneity problem. The subsample regression results showed that work value perception significantly affected the physical and mental health of female, male, married, unmarried, religious, and nonreligious workers. Furthermore, life satisfaction mediated the effect of work value perception on workers’ health. These results shed light on the relationship between work value perception and health and thus have implications for improving workers’ physical and mental health. This study can provide a reference for both governmental and corporate policymakers in emerging economies.
... Another moderator was mentoring of the manager. Mentoring moderates the effects of task identity and autonomy on thriving at work, such that these effects will be stronger for those who receive lower-quality mentoring [92]. ...
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There has been a significant increase in studies on personal energy at work. Yet, research efforts are fragmented, given that scholars employ a diversity of related concepts. To bring clarity, we executed a two-fold systematic literature review. We crafted a definition of personal energy at work and a theoretical framework, outlining the dimensions, antecedents and boundary conditions. The theoretical implication of the framework is that it allows one to explain why—given similar work—some employees feel energized whereas others do not. The difference depends on the context that the employer offers, the personal characteristics of employees and the processes of strain and recovery. The paper concludes with a discussion of how future research can build on the proposed framework to advance the theoretical depth and empirical investigation of personal energy at work.
... A range of researches reported a positive connection between university autonomy and job satisfaction (Gözükara & Çolakoğlu, 2016;Rodríguez et al., 2016). Workers that are given high university autonomy show positive consequences and have the feelings of a determined job which is obvious from their efforts, hard work, and decisions (Jiang et al., 2020). Besides, the study highlights that the high level of institutional autonomy enhances employee's positive feelings and job outcomes (Liu & Lo, 2018). ...
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This study aims to stimulate extensive research to determine the role ambiguity as a mediating variable between university autonomy and its possible outcomes (Job satisfaction, job performance) through conditioning influence of cultural tightness-looseness. A survey was used to gather the data from 348 (with 77% response rate of participants) respondents working at various positions (i.e., managerial and teaching, etc.) in both public and private universities and tested the proposed hypotheses and model. The findings show that university autonomy significantly relates to job satisfaction rather than job performance. Results also depict that role ambiguity works as a partial mediator (in case of autonomy and job satisfaction), while as a full mediator (for autonomy and job performance) the direct association of university autonomy and job performance are not found. This study develops theoretical knowledge about university autonomy and job outcomes through the moderated mediation of culture tightness-looseness and role ambiguity in the context of Pakistani universities. As an important dimension of culture, CTL is an amount, the strength of social standards in a civilization and the degree to which deviations from these norms are tolerated. This study also explores the key mechanism of submissively holding back of the relevant thoughts, by which role ambiguity hampers job performance and satisfaction. Thus, the ways to control this process through encouraging the staff, receptive attention and the awareness of current experiences have also been discussed.
... However, Parker and Grote (2020) also highlighted the case when iPads were introduced into nursing homes and reduced the perception of autonomy due to the constant surveillance of job activities (Moore and Hayes 2018). Such excessive supervision in healthcare organisations may lead to a lower level of job satisfaction, and therefore healthcare professionals' autonomy, which is important to improve their motivation and offer quality healthcare services (Jiang et al. 2020). Overall, AI tools seem to be already widely used to keep track of the timing and completion of a variety of tasks of professionals in health-care, as illustrated by the examples of Klick Health (Kellogg, Valentine and Christin 2020) and reported by Lebovitz, Lifshitz-Assaf and Levina (2019), who have shown that radiologists have to deal with increased ambiguity and doubt and can often overrule the introduced AI diagnostics system. ...
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We introduce social networks theory and methods as a way of understanding mentoring in the current career context. We first introduce a typology of "developmental networks" using core concepts from social networks theory - network diversity and tie strength - to view mentoring as a multiple relationship phenomenon. We then propose a framework illustrating factors that shape developmental network structures and offer propositions focusing on the developmental consequences for individuals having different types of developmental networks in their careers. We conclude with strategies both for testing our propositions and for researching multiple developmental relationships further.
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The present diary study examines how employees thrive at work in response to resources (i.e., positive meaning, relational resources, and knowledge). Thriving is conceptualized as the joint experience of vitality and learning. A total of 121 employees working in the social services sector responded to three daily surveys (in the morning, at lunchtime, and at the end of the work day) for a period of five work days. Intra-individual analyses (hierarchical linear modeling) revealed that on days when employees experience positive meaning at work in the morning, they feel more vital at the end of the work day and have a higher sense of learning. Work behaviors such as task focus and exploration mediated the relation between positive meaning and both components of thriving. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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We develop and test a model of successful aging at work in 2 studies. The first identifies key human resource (HR) practices that late-career workers find valuable, and explores workers’ experiences of them. The second examines the role of those practices along with individual behavioral strategies in successful aging at work, as expressed by a sense of thriving and by 3 dimensions of job performance. We also introduce the new construct of surviving at work, contrasting with thriving. Study 1 reports qualitative data from interviews with 37 older workers (nearly all 55+) and 10 HR managers in the United Kingdom and Bulgarian healthcare and information and communication technology sectors. Study 2 employs quantitative data from 853 U.K. older workers in the same 2 sectors. We find (Study 1) 8 types of HR practices that seem particularly salient to older workers, and which they experience to varying extents. These practices cut across existing typologies, and we recommend them for future research. In Study 2 we find that selection, optimization, and compensation strategies adopted by individuals are directly related to self-rated job performance, and mediate some of the effects of HR practices on job performance. In addition, optimization specifically affects performance via thriving, and to a lesser extent via surviving. The same is true for availability of HR practices. The results demonstrate the importance of both HR practices and individual strategies in fostering successful aging at work, and the important role of thriving in this process.
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I: Background.- 1. An Introduction.- 2. Conceptualizations of Intrinsic Motivation and Self-Determination.- II: Self-Determination Theory.- 3. Cognitive Evaluation Theory: Perceived Causality and Perceived Competence.- 4. Cognitive Evaluation Theory: Interpersonal Communication and Intrapersonal Regulation.- 5. Toward an Organismic Integration Theory: Motivation and Development.- 6. Causality Orientations Theory: Personality Influences on Motivation.- III: Alternative Approaches.- 7. Operant and Attributional Theories.- 8. Information-Processing Theories.- IV: Applications and Implications.- 9. Education.- 10. Psychotherapy.- 11. Work.- 12. Sports.- References.- Author Index.
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Studies that combine moderation and mediation are prevalent in basic and applied psychology research. Typically, these studies are framed in terms of moderated mediation or mediated moderation, both of which involve similar analytical approaches. Unfortunately, these approaches have important shortcomings that conceal the nature of the moderated and the mediated effects under investigation. This article presents a general analytical framework for combining moderation and mediation that integrates moderated regression analysis and path analysis. This framework clarifies how moderator variables influence the paths that constitute the direct, indirect, and total effects of mediated models. The authors empirically illustrate this framework and give step-by-step instructions for estimation and interpretation. They summarize the advantages of their framework over current approaches, explain how it subsumes moderated mediation and mediated moderation, and describe how it can accommodate additional moderator and mediator variables, curvilinear relationships, and structural equation models with latent variables.
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This article presents two studies that examine the moderated serial multiple mediation model between Family Supportive Supervisors Behaviors (FSSB) and individual’s thriving at work through psychological availability and work-family enrichment at conditional levels of need for caring. Drawing on the Resource-Gain-Development framework (Wayne et al., 2007) and self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985), the results of the 6-month time-lagged data demonstrate, in Study 1 (Italian sample = 156), that FSSB is associated with greater individual thriving at work via work-family enrichment and that this indirect relationship is significant exclusively for those who perceive a higher need for caring. In Study 2 (Chinese sample = 356), the results demonstrate the relationship between FSSB and thriving at work is serially mediated by both psychological availability and work-family enrichment at conditional level of need for caring. In particular, the results demonstrate that individuals with a higher need for caring responded more favorably to the presence of a family supportive supervisor than those experiencing a lower need for caring. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
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This study was designed to test the relationship between perceived social impact, social worth, supervisor-rated job performance (one month later), and mediating effects by commitment to customers and work engagement. The hypotheses were tested with SEM analysis in a field study with 370 customer service employees from bank, retail, and sales positions. Results confirm that perceived social impact is associated with better job performance and that this relationship is mediated by work engagement. Furthermore, results support a second mediating mechanism in which perceived social impact and social worth are associated with engagement through affective commitment to customers. Finally, it was found that engaged employees are rated as better performers by supervisors one month later. This study supports the motivational approach to performance and highlights the role that interactions with customers may play in motivating service employees. Practical implications are discussed highlighting the need to consider the social dynamics in service contexts.
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Eudaimonia is an ancient Greek concept that focuses on becoming the best one can be. The purpose of this theoretical paper is to integrate the concept of eudaimonia into management literature to enhance our understanding of employees’ optimal functioning in the workplace. By drawing on literature on eudaimonia from both the philosophy and psychology disciplines, I proposed a high-order construct of eudaimonic orientation which describes one’s desire to develop the best in one’s self and to express one’s core self in the service of the greater good. I further delineated a theoretical model of eudaimonic orientation to illustrate the mechanisms through which eudaimonic orientation influences work behaviors and outcomes.
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This study began with the premise that people can use varying degrees of their selves. physically. cognitively. and emotionally. in work role performances. which has implications for both their work and experi­ ences. Two qualitative. theory-generating studies of summer camp counselors and members of an architecture firm were conducted to explore the conditions at work in which people personally engage. or express and employ their personal selves. and disengage. or withdraw and defend their personal selves. This article describes and illustrates three psychological conditions-meaningfulness. safety. and availabil­ ity-and their individual and contextual sources. These psychological conditions are linked to existing theoretical concepts. and directions for future research are described. People occupy roles at work; they are the occupants of the houses that roles provide. These events are relatively well understood; researchers have focused on "role sending" and "receiving" (Katz & Kahn. 1978). role sets (Merton. 1957). role taking and socialization (Van Maanen. 1976), and on how people and their roles shape each other (Graen. 1976). Researchers have given less attention to how people occupy roles to varying degrees-to how fully they are psychologically present during particular moments of role performances. People can use varying degrees of their selves. physically, cognitively, and emotionally. in the roles they perform. even as they main­ tain the integrity of the boundaries between who they are and the roles they occupy. Presumably, the more people draw on their selves to perform their roles within those boundaries. the more stirring are their performances and the more content they are with the fit of the costumes they don. The research reported here was designed to generate a theoretical frame­ work within which to understand these "self-in-role" processes and to sug­ gest directions for future research. My specific concern was the moments in which people bring themselves into or remove themselves from particular task behaviors, My guiding assumption was that people are constantly bring­ ing in and leaving out various depths of their selves during the course of The guidance and support of David Berg, Richard Hackman, and Seymour Sarason in the research described here are gratefully acknowledged. I also greatly appreciated the personal engagements of this journal's two anonymous reviewers in their roles, as well as the comments on an earlier draft of Tim Hall, Kathy Kram, and Vicky Parker.
Article
This study examined the role of subordinate voice in creating positive attitudes in the performance appraisal context. Two aspects of voice, instrumental and non-instrumental, were assessed. Both aspects of voice were related to satisfaction with the appraisal, while only non-instrumental voice had an impact on attitudes toward the manager. Implications for procedural justice and performance appraisal are discussed.
Article
In this paper, we establish the relationship between de-energizing relationships and individual performance in organizations. To date, the emphasis in social network research has largely been on positive dimensions of relationships despite literature from social psychology revealing the prevalence and detrimental impact of de-energizing relationships. In 2 field studies, we show that de-energizing relationships in organizations are associated with decreased performance. In Study 1, we investigate how de-energizing relationships are related to lower performance using data from 161 people in the information technology (IT) department of an engineering firm. In Study 2, in a sample of 439 management consultants, we consider whether the effects of de-energizing relationships on performance may be moderated by the extent to which an individual has the psychological resource of thriving at work. We find that individuals who are thriving at work are less susceptible to the effects of de-energizing relationships on job performance. We close by discussing implications of this research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).
Article
I describe a test of linear moderated mediation in path analysis based on an interval estimate of the parameter of a function linking the indirect effect to values of a moderator—a parameter that I call the index of moderated mediation. This test can be used for models that integrate moderation and mediation in which the relationship between the indirect effect and the moderator is estimated as linear, including many of the models described by Edwards and Lambert (200710. Edwards, J.R., & Lambert, L.S. (2007). Methods for integrating moderation and mediation: A general analytical framework using moderated path analysis. Psychological Methods, 12, 1–22.[CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®]View all references) and Preacher, Rucker, and Hayes (200743. Preacher, K.J., Rucker, D.D., & Hayes, A.F. (2007). Assessing moderated mediation hypotheses: Theory, methods, and prescriptions. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 42, 185–227.[Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®]View all references) as well as extensions of these models to processes involving multiple mediators operating in parallel or in serial. Generalization of the method to latent variable models is straightforward. Three empirical examples describe the computation of the index and the test, and its implementation is illustrated using Mplus and the PROCESS macro for SPSS and SAS.
Article
Theory suggests that thriving, the feeling of vitality and experience of learning, is in large part determined by the social environment of employees’ workplace. One important aspect of this social environment is the position of an individual in the communication network. Individuals who are sources of communication for many colleagues often receive benefits because other employees depend heavily on these individuals for information; however, there may also be drawbacks to this dependence. In particular, employees who are central in the communication network may experience more role overload and role ambiguity and, in turn, lower levels of workplace thriving. Individual differences are also likely to explain why some individuals are more likely to thrive. Relying on research that views organizations as political arenas, we identify political skill as an individual difference that is likely to enhance workplace thriving. Using a moderated-mediation analysis, we find support for the indirect cost of communication centrality on workplace thriving through role overload and role ambiguity. Furthermore, we identify both direct and moderating effects of political skill. Specifically, political skill mitigates the extent to which employees experience role ambiguity, but not role overload, associated with their position in the communication network, and these effects carry through to affect thriving. Star employees are often central in communication networks; with this in mind, we discuss the implications of our findings for employees and organizations.
Article
In this article, the author describes a new theoretical perspective on positive emotions and situates this new perspective within the emerging field of positive psychology. The broaden-and-build theory posits that experiences of positive emotions broaden people's momentary thought-action repertoires, which in turn serves to build their enduring personal resources, ranging from physical and intellectual resources to social and psychological resources. Preliminary empirical evidence supporting the broaden-and-build theory is reviewed, and open empirical questions that remain to be tested are identified. The theory and findings suggest that the capacity to experience positive emotions may be a fundamental human strength central to the study of human flourishing.
Article
We know little about what determines an effective placement experience, yet vocational placements are an integral part of many professional degree programmes. The aim of this research was to examine the influence of job (task variety, task identity, task significance, feedback, and autonomy) and supervisor (relationship quality and mentoring) characteristics on placement outcomes. The findings were tested on samples from two professions for which placement were a compulsory part of their course. Sample 1 consisted of 266 undergraduate nurses, and sample 2 consisted of 176 postgraduate psychologists. The findings showed that job and supervisor characteristics explained unique variance in professional development and placement satisfaction. Of the five job characteristics examined, skill variety, feedback from the job, and task significance influenced placement outcomes. Mentoring emerged as the most important supervisor characteristic that was associated with professional development and placement satisfaction, and to a slightly less extent, supervisor–student relationship quality was also important. The research and practical implications of the findings were discussed.
Article
Purpose ‐ Based on soft HRM and self-determination theory, the aim of this paper is to test whether basic need satisfaction mediates the relationship between five HR practices and HRM outcomes. An important distinction (in line with soft HRM and self-determination theory) is made between the presence of, and the quality of, a practice's implementation (in terms of the degree to which employees' talents, interests and expectations are taken into account). Design/methodology/approach ‐ A theoretically grounded model is developed and tested using survey data from 5,748 Belgian employees. Findings ‐ The results indicate that autonomy and relatedness satisfaction partially mediate the relationship between HR practices and HRM outcomes. Taking into account talents, interests and expectations within HR practices is associated with higher basic need satisfaction and subsequently HRM outcomes in addition to the presence of practices. Research limitations/implications ‐ Future research could focus on HR practices and job design as both might affect basic need satisfaction and subsequently HRM outcomes. Additionally, behavior of the supervisor when administering HR practices can be further explored as a catalyst of basic need satisfaction. Practical implications ‐ HR actors should be aware that merely implementing soft HR practices may not suffice. They should also devote attention towards sufficiently taking into account individual talents, interests and expectations of employees when implementing them. Originality/value ‐ This paper contributes to the HRM literature by integrating soft HRM and self-determination theory into one model. In doing so, it sheds light on the possible pathways through and conditions under which HR practices lead to favorable outcomes.
Article
Self-determination theory (SDT) posits the existence of distinct types of motivation (i.e., external, introjected, identified, integrated, and intrinsic). Research on these different types of motivation has typically adopted a variable-centered approach that seeks to understand how each motivation in isolation relates to employee outcomes. We extend this work by adopting cluster analysis in a person-centered approach to understanding how different combinations or patterns of motivations relate to organizational factors. Results revealed five distinct clusters of motivation (i.e., low introjection, moderately motivated, low autonomy, self-determined, and motivated) and that these clusters were differentially related to need satisfaction, job performance, and work environment perceptions. Specifically, the self-determined (i.e., high autonomous motivation, low external motivation) and motivated (i.e., high on all types of motivation) clusters had the most favorable levels of correlates; whereas the low autonomy (i.e., least self-determined) cluster had the least favorable levels of these variables.
Article
Thriving at work is a positive psychological state characterized jointly by learning and vitality. Conventional wisdom and some initial research indicate that such thriving benefits both employees themselves and their organizations. This study specifically tests thriving at work by linking it to a theoretically important personal outcome variable (self-development), refining its relationship with agentic work behaviors (task focus and heedful relating), and proposing and testing two new antecedent variables (psychological capital and supervisor support climate). Using structural equation modeling on a sample of 198 dyads (employees and their supervisors), strong support was found for the theory-driven hypothesized relationships. The results contribute to a better understanding of positive organizational scholarship and behavior in general and specifically to the recently emerging positive construct of employees' thriving at work. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Article
Mentoring has been studied extensively as it is linked to protégé career development and growth. Recent mentoring research is beginning to acknowledge however that mentors also can accrue substantial benefits from mentoring. A meta-analysis was conducted where the provision of career, psychosocial and role modeling mentoring support were associated with five types of subjective career outcomes for mentors: job satisfaction, organizational commitment, turnover intent, job performance, and career success. The findings indicated that mentors versus non-mentors were more satisfied with their jobs and committed to the organization. Providing career mentoring was most associated with career success, psychosocial mentoring with organizational commitment, and role modeling mentoring with job performance. Turnover intent was not linked significantly with any of the subjective career outcome variables. The findings support mentoring theory in that mentoring is reciprocal and collaborative and not simply beneficial for protégés. Longitudinal research is needed however to determine the degree to which providing mentoring impacts a mentor’s career over time. By alerting prospective mentors to the possible personal benefits of providing career, psychosocial, and role modeling mentoring support for protégés, HRD professionals can improve recruitment efforts for mentoring programs.
Article
It has been proposed that a clear separation of measurement from structural reasons for model failure can be obtained via a procedure testing 4 nested models: (a) a factor model, (b) a confirmatory factor model, (c) the anticipated structural equation model, and (d) possibly, a more constrained model. Advocates of the 4-step procedure contend that these nested models provide a trustworthy way of determining whether one's model is failing as a result of structural (conceptual) inadequacy, or as a result of measurement misspecification. We argue that measurement and structural issues can not be unambiguously separated by the 4 steps, and that the seeming separation is incomplete at best and illusory at worst. The prime difficulty is that the 4-step procedure is incapable of determining whether the proposed model contains the proper number of factors. As long as the number of factors is in doubt, measurement and structural assessments remain dubious and entwined. The assessment of model fit raises additional difficulties because the researcher is implicitly favoring of the null hypothesis, and the logic of the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) as a test of "close fit" is inconsistent with the logic of the 4-step. These discussions question whether factor analysis can dependably determine the proper number of factors, and argue against the routine use of. 05 as the probability target for structural equation model chi-square fit.
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating role of mentoring on the relationships between perceived organizational support, supervisor support, and job fit on turnover intentions. Design/methodology/approach – The paper explains the topics, provides background and discussion of the main concepts. The study uses regression analyses to test the moderating relationships using a total sample of 610 employees split among three separate organizations. Findings – The results suggest that mentoring becomes more effective in reducing turnover intentions as employees experience increasing levels of perceived organizational support, supervisor support, and job fit. Practical implications – The results suggest mentoring can be beneficial to both organizations and individuals. Organizations benefit by improving employee retention. Likewise, individuals benefit through strengthened relationships provided by mentoring and the associated positive outcomes. Originality/value – The paper makes a contribution to the literature by being among the first to examine mentoring as a potential moderator in the context of perceived organizational support, supervisor support, job fit, and turnover intentions.
Article
Translated but unstandardised psychological instruments are widely used in non-English speaking countries. For many of these instruments meagre information is available on the method of translation, extent of adaptations, reliability, validity and other psychometric properties. This lack of information has unforeseen consequences for test-takers and decision making in clinical and other applied settings. In this paper it is argued that there is a need for guidelines outlining the minimum requirements to justify professional and ethical use of unstandardised psychological instruments. Eight criteria are suggested and all of these should be met in order to justify the use of unstandardised instruments in applied settings. Finally, it is emphasised that the use of unstandardised instruments should be viewed as temporary and tentative; the final aim of all translations and adaptations of psychological instruments that are to be used in a clinical or other applied context should be proper standardisation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
Murray provides step-by-step guidelines for putting together cost-effective mentoring programs that foster employee learning and growth, are personally rewarding for mentors, and contribute measurably to both individual and organizational performance. Using seven case examples of thriving and highly valued mentoring programs, Murray shows the diverse forms mentoring programs can take and how they serve a variety of needs, such as developing leadership skills, increasing employee versatility through cross-training, and encouraging top-drawer people to commit their careers to the organization. This book reveals what successful programs have in common and offers advice on how to avoid common pitfalls. The author details how to select competent, committed mentors who have the interpersonal skills to develop productive relationships with their protégés. She explains how to match protégés with compatible mentors and create useful working agreements between them. She demonstrates how to build in opportunities for vital midstream course corrections by making evaluation an integral part of the program rather than merely a report card at the end. And she provides frank advice about what to do when a mentoring relationship just isn't working. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
Describes the Job Diagnostic Survey (JDS) which is intended to (a) diagnose existing jobs to determine whether (and how) they might be redesigned to improve employee motivation and productivity and (b) evaluate the effects of job changes on employees. The instrument is based on a specific theory of how job design affects work motivation, and provides measures of (a) objective job dimensions, (b) individual psychological states resulting from these dimensions, (c) affective reactions of employees to the job and work setting, and (d) individual growth need strength (interpreted as the readiness of individuals to respond to "enriched" jobs). Reliability and validity data are summarized for 658 employees on 62 different jobs in 7 organizations who responded to a revised version of the instrument. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
This study investigated the relationships among leader–member exchange (LMX), perceived job security, and employee performance. Drawing on the job demands–resources model and conservation of resources theory, we expected both LMX and perceived job security would affect employee altruism and work performance in a positive manner. In addition, LMX and perceived job security were expected to interact to predict the two outcome variables. The hypotheses were tested with a sample of 184 employees in a state-owned enterprise in China. Our results showed that LMX, but not perceived job security, was positively related to employee altruism and work performance. Additionally, the effect of LMX on altruism was stronger for employees perceiving less job security. The findings indicated that LMX as a job resource becomes more impactful to altruistic performance when employees feel less secure at work.