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Preliminary forecasts of catch and stock abundance for 1993 Alaska Herring Fisheries. Regional Information Report 5J93-06. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Juneau, Alaska.

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The Pacific herring Clupea pallasi sac roe harvest in Alaska for 1993 is projected to be 76,063 tons (ton=2,000 pounds). Herring food/bait harvests for 1993 are projected to be 9,938 tons. Herring spawn-on-pound-kelp fisheries are expected to produce 335 tons of product and spawn- on-wild-kelp harvests are expected to produce an additional 443 tons. The projected sac roe, food/bait, and spawn-on-kelp harvests are expected to increase from the 1992 levels. The 1992 herring harvest had an estimated value to fishermen of $31,504,867. Of the total 1992 value, sac roe fisheries contributed $25,160,330, spawn-on-pound-kelp fisheries $3,722,000, food/bait fisheries $2,135,156, and spawn-on-wild-kelp fisheries $487,38 1. Excellent recruitment from the 1988 year class in most areas has caused stock levels to increase. In many areas the 1988 year class appears to be the largest on record. This strong year class will be age 5 for the 1993 harvest. KEY WORDS: Herring, Clupea pallasi, herring harvest projection, herring stock assessment, herring sac roe fishery, herring food/bait fishery, herring spawn-on-kelp fishery
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... Typically, the kelp constitutes 21-25% of the weight. Sources: Lebida et al. 1984, ADF&G 1986, 2004, Lebida 1986, Hamner 1988, Savikko 1989, Savikko and Page 1990, Funk 1991, Funk and Harris 1992, ADF&G 2018. those that are most easily accessible from the road system. ...
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... Typically the kelp constitutes 21-25% of the weight. References: Lebida, Whitmore and Sandone, 1984, ADF&G 1986, 2004., Lebida 1986, Hamner 1988, Savikko 1989, Savikko and Page 1990, Funk 1991, Funk and Harris 1992 There exists a much smaller harvest in SE Alaska of the red alga Porphyra. The main species harvested are Porphyra abbottae and P. torta. ...
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