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The Impact of Food Intakes on Skin Health Mini Review

Authors:

Abstract

Nutrition refers the necessary foods for health and the states of being free from illnesses [1]. A healthy diet contains natural foods , plant-based nutrients, wholegrains to meet human daily requirements. A mix of proper proteins, carbohydrates, and fat and enough vitamins are the keys for optimal diet. Poor nutrition primary can result in undesired appearances in human [2]. Research shows low quality food components at the first stage exacerbate the skin integrity. Among different foods and beverages frequents drinks intakes such as alcohol dramatically affect the appearances and skin features. Per each time of drinking alcohol body gets dehydrated which initially can deplete skin blood's capil-laries flow (fluids). Consequently, chronic drinking of alcohol can have detrimental impacts on skin health in long-terms [3]. Some evidence-based studies outline consuming dairy products which combined with high levels of refined foods negatively impact skin texture. It is believed that, eliminating dairy intakes products like skimmed milk, yogurt, and cheese can protect skin features from conditions such as acne and rosacea [4].
ACTA SCIENTIFIC NUTRITIONAL HEALTH (ISSN:2582-1423)
Volume 3 Issue 12 December 2019
The Impact of Food Intakes on Skin Health
Nasim Habibzadeh*
School of Health and Life Since, Teesside University, United Kingdom
*Corresponding Author: Nasim Habibzadeh, School of Health and Life Since, Teesside University, United Kingdom.
Mini Review
Received: October 14, 2019; Published: November 04, 2019
Nutrition refers the necessary foods for health and the states
of being free from illnesses [1]. A healthy diet contains natural
foods , plant-based nutrients, wholegrains to meet human daily re-
quirements. A mix of proper proteins, carbohydrates, and fat and
enough vitamins are the keys for optimal diet. Poor nutrition pri-
mary can result in undesired appearances in human [2].

exacerbate the skin integrity. Among different foods and beverages
frequents drinks intakes such as alcohol dramatically affect the
appearances and skin features. Per each time of drinking alcohol
body gets dehydrated which initially can deplete skin blood's capil-
  
have detrimental impacts on skin health in long-terms [3].
Some evidence - based studies outline consuming dairy prod-
    
impact skin texture. It is believed that, eliminating dairy intakes
products like skimmed milk, yogurt, and cheese can protect skin
features from conditions such as acne and rosacea [4].
Introduction
Keywords: Skin; Foods; Drinks; Health
Abstract
Good nutrition is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle. Healthy food intakes will lead to an optimal health condition that ini-

-

as skimmed milk impair the skin layer. Nonetheless, using natural foods and drinks in daily consumptions and avoiding unhealthy
types of diet can boost skin health and skin quality in long terms.

its appearance. Lack of water can cause dry skin. A balanced -water
consumption can help to remove toxins and any other by-products
from body which improves skin tone [5]-


      

Saturated fats, sugars and salt foods such as pizza, chips and
hamburgers notably alter skin surface as individual who often con-
sume these type of foods look older than those individual which
consume natural or conventional foods [6]. More consumptions of
-
ing natural sweets like dried fruits and dates are good substitutes
for junk foods like chips for continuing skin health tone [7].
More importantly, consuming not enough fruits, vegetables are
associated with ill skin health. Fruits and vegetables are foods for
healthy skin and because they contain great amount of antioxi-
Citation: Nasim Habibzadeh. “The Impact Food Intakes on Skin Health". 
The Impact of Food Intakes on Skin Health
35
Bibliography
Volume 3 Issue 12 December 2019
© All rights are reserved by Nasim Habibzadeh.
dants can help to protect skin from early skin – ageing appearance
[8]      
which enhance skin aesthetic [9].
 
contents essential fats or fatty acids, vitamin E and B vitamins
which retain skin elasticity and quality toward glowing skin. Sun-

promote skin health [10,11]. Therefore, nuts are healthy snakes to
maintain skin heath if one’s can get used to it.
Generally, the type of diets affect skin health in different indi-
vidual. Evidence proves that some foods or drinks ensure the skin
health and its appearance and some other cause skin lesions. Un-
-
gurt, and cheese and foods such as pizza, chips and hamburgers.

consumptions are associated with ill skin health. Heavily drinking
         
texture. Nevertheless, a proper diet that could contain a balanced
  
skin health and its features in all individual over time.
Conclusion
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
2. Smith RN., et al. “The effect of a high-protein, low glycemic-
load diet versus a conventional, high glycemic-load diet on
-
domized, investigator-masked, controlled trial”. 
American Academy of Dermatology 
3. Acta
Dermatovenerologica Croatica 
4. et al  
      
and Young Adults”. 
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
6. 
lead to the several health. 

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Health
10. Habibzadeh N. “Nuts, Optimum Substitutes for any Meal”. Acta
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11.     
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Citation: Nasim Habibzadeh. “The Impact of Food Intakes on Skin Health". 
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There are significant data supporting the role of diet in acne. Our Western diet includes many dairy sources containing hormones.. The natural function of milk being to stimulate growth, it contains anabolic steroids as well as true growth hormones and other growth factors. The presence of 5α-pregnanedione, 5α-androstanedione, and other precursors of 5α-dihydrotestosterone add to the potency of milk as a stimulant of acne. In addition, foods with significant sugar content and other carbohydrates yielding high glycemic loads affect serum insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels, both of which promote increased production of available androgens and the subsequent development of acne.
Relationship between the dietary intake of water and skin hydration
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Palma ML., et al. "Relationship between the dietary intake of water and skin hydration". Journal Biomedical and Biopharmaceutical Research 9 (2012): 173-181.