Conference Paper

Enabling the Creation of Intelligent Things: Bringing Artificial Intelligence and Robotics to Schools

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  • Austrian Computer Society
  • Austrian Computer Society
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... In order to meet these challenges, the European Driving License for Robots and Intelligent Systems (EDLRIS) was developed [39,41,49] 1 . This novel educational project aimed at the development and implementation of a professional, standardized, and internationally accepted system for training and certifying teachers and educators (in this context referred to as trainers) and school students, apprentices and young people (referred to as trainees, learners respectively) in AI and Robotics. ...
... In general, the project comprises four stages [41]: Stage 1-foundation: The EDLRIS project consortium is composed of two technical universities in Austria (AT) and Hungary (HU) which have a strong research background in AI and Robotics ensuring sound technological preparation, one university of teacher education (AT) ensuring the sound didactical preparation as well as two computer societies (AT, HU) with long-term experience in conducting computer certifications across Europe. As a first step, the educational needs of society and economy as well as the expected Robotics and AI skills of graduates were assessed by conducting a survey among various stakeholders from educational institutions and industry. ...
... It turned out that certain teaching methods, and teaching materials/ tools had to be adapted, and the complexity and extend of certain contents had to be reduced in order to impart AI/ Robotics topics in a target group specific manner. Based on the insights of this pilot implementation, the further AI and Robotics modules were developed and adapted accordingly [41]. The thesis of Lassnig [44] describes in detail the development, realization, and evaluation as well as results and conclusions of this first pilot implementation. ...
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This article presents a novel educational project aiming at the development and implementation of a professional, standardized, internationally accepted system for training and certifying teachers, school students and young people in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Robotics. In recent years, AI and Robotics have become major topics with a huge impact not only on our everyday life but also on the working environment. Hence, sound knowledge about principles and concepts of AI and Robotics are key skills for this century. Nonetheless, hardly any systematic approaches exist that focus on teaching principles of intelligent systems at K-12 level, addressing students as well as teachers who act as multipliers. In order to meet this challenge, the European Driving License for Robots and Intelligent Systems—EDLRIS was developed. It is based on a number of previously implemented and evaluated projects and comprises teaching curricula and training modules for AI and Robotics, following a competency-based, blended learning approach. Additionally, a certification system proves peoples’ acquired competencies. After developing the training and certification system, the first 32 trainer and trainee courses with a total of 445 participants have been implemented and evaluated. By applying this innovative approach—a standardized and widely recognized training and certification system for AI and Robotics at K-12 level for both high school teachers and students—we envision to foster AI/Robotics literacy on a broad basis.
... One special method to highlight is the in-application ask questions of Microsoft Power BI [43] which allows the users to ask a question related to the data set they are currently working on. Tool-specific: For the scientific publications we identified three onboarding approaches which can be categorized as tool-specific [45,69,32]. The remaining six are non-tool-specific [2,40,62,52,8,19]. ...
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