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Using the Fractal Enterprise Model for Inter-organizational Business Processes

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Inter-organizational processes are important for delivering complex services and products. While these processes are important, they are also difficult to design and change. In this paper, we examine how a particular kind of model, the Fractal Enterprise Model (FEM), can help in describing and analyzing changes to inter-organizational processes. FEM is asset-based, meaning that it is focusing on how processes share and consume resources. We use a case study performed at a health care region in Sweden as the base of our examination. In the case, potential changes that affect the organization have been identified, and we use these changes to create FEMs. Based on the case, the need to extend FEM to improve its utility for modeling inter-organizational processes is identified
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... Organizational boundary (Goal 26, 27): The importance of organizational boundary has been identified in our earlier work [15,31]. It defines the limits of an organization's capabilities. ...
... Boundary control (Goal 27): Initially explored as a modeling element in [31], the concept concerns any type of control between organizations, so as to regulate the interaction. It may refer to any level of control, from an informal agreement, to a detailed formal contract. ...
Conference Paper
Organizations are operating within dynamic environments that present changes, opportunities and threats to which they need to respond by adapting their capabilities. Organizational capabilities can be supported by Information Systems during their design and run-time phases, which often requires the capabilities’ adaptation. Currently, enterprise modeling and capability modeling facilitate the design and analysis of capabilities but improvements regarding capability change can be made. This design science research study introduces a capability change meta-model that will serve as the basis for the development of a method and a supporting tool for capability change. The meta-model is applied to a case study at a Swedish public healthcare organization. This application provides insight on possible opportunities to improve the meta-model in future iterations.
... The FEM toolkit is being developed on the metamodeling platform ADOxx [2]. Though the tool is specialized for FEM and the development is specific to ADOxx, the requirements we derived from using FEM and first tool prototypes in projects, such as [3,4] are more general and can be encountered in other modeling tools being developed for other modeling languages on other metamodeling platforms -or even without such a platform. ...
... In the practical terms, we are working on the next version of FEM toolkit (0.8) with an additional classification option, which will be orthogonal to the existing subclassing, and which will have visualization via coloring the shapes' borders. This kind of classification might be useful in multi-organizational contexts of the type discussed in [3]. Another feature that is considered for the new version is allowing the usage of several subclassing forms along with a switching mechanism to have several, mutually exclusive perspectives on the same FEM diagram. ...
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... FEM technique is relatively new, being fully introduced in a journal paper in 2017 [9]. Even though it has been tested in several research-oriented and practical projects, such as described in [11] [12], its capabilities and limitations are not thoroughly investigated. Also, the initial paper [9] envisions several areas of usage, but the list is generic and does not include a detailed set of problems/scenarios where FEM can be applied. ...
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