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Culture, Norms, and the Assessment of Communication Contexts: Discussion and Pointers for the Future

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... Much work in social/cross-cultural psychology and the intercultural field has focused on the impact of different values on behaviour (e.g., Gudykunst, 2004;Hofstede, 2001;Triandis, 1995), but recently there has been increasing awareness of the potential impact of conceptions of situation or context (Lefringhausen et al., 2019Leung & Morris, 2015;Smith, 2015;Ting-Toomey & Oetzel, 2013). The notion of situation or context can be unpacked in various ways, but for understanding communicative interaction, Brown and Fraser (1979) classic depiction is extremely useful (see Lefringhausen et al., 2019 for an overview). ...
... Much work in social/cross-cultural psychology and the intercultural field has focused on the impact of different values on behaviour (e.g., Gudykunst, 2004;Hofstede, 2001;Triandis, 1995), but recently there has been increasing awareness of the potential impact of conceptions of situation or context (Lefringhausen et al., 2019Leung & Morris, 2015;Smith, 2015;Ting-Toomey & Oetzel, 2013). The notion of situation or context can be unpacked in various ways, but for understanding communicative interaction, Brown and Fraser (1979) classic depiction is extremely useful (see Lefringhausen et al., 2019 for an overview). They draw a fundamental distinction between participants and scene, and within the latter they propose several particularly helpful concepts, one of which is activity type. ...
... tools needed), and environment (social features like atmosphere and physical features like furniture). From an intercultural perspective, activity type is a very important construct because participants of any given activity may hold different conceptions and expectations around each of these features (Lefringhausen et al., 2019;Spencer-Oatey & Kádár, in press). Any mismatch in expectations can affect participants' evaluations of each other and hence impact on their relations. ...
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Roberts, C., & Campbell, S. (2006). Talk on trial: Job interviews, language and ethnicity (A report of research carried out by King's College London on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions, Research Report No 344). Retrieved from https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130125095941/http:// research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd5/summ2005-2006/344summ.pdf
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Allwood, J. (2007). Activity based studies of linguistic interaction. Gothenburg Papers in Theoretical Linguistics. Retrieved from https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/hprints-00460511/document
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Culpeper, J., & Kan, Q. (2019). Communicative styles, rapport, and student engagement: An online peer mentoring scheme. Applied Linguistics. Advance online publication. doi:10.1093/applin/amz035