Conference Paper

P4-NetFPGA-based network slicing solution for 5G MEC architectures

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... GRED is implemented in P4, but the authors do not specify on which target. [389] 2018 bmv2 Aghdai et al. [390,391] 2018/19 Netronome GRED [392] 2019 bmv2 HDS [393] 2020 -Shen et al. [394] 2019 Xilinx SDNet Lee et al. [395] 2019 Tofino Ricart-Sanchez et al. [396] 2019 ...
... Ricart-Sanchez et al. [396] propose an extension for the P4-NetFPGA framework for network slicing between different 5G users. The authors extend the capabilities of the P4 pipeline and implement their mechanism on the NetFPGA-SUME. ...
Preprint
With traditional networking, users can configure control plane protocols to match the specific network configuration, but without the ability to fundamentally change the underlying algorithms. With SDN, the users may provide their own control plane, that can control network devices through their data plane APIs. Programmable data planes allow users to define their own data plane algorithms for network devices including appropriate data plane APIs which may be leveraged by user-defined SDN control. Thus, programmable data planes and SDN offer great flexibility for network customization, be it for specialized, commercial appliances, e.g., in 5G or data center networks, or for rapid prototyping in industrial and academic research. Programming protocol-independent packet processors (P4) has emerged as the currently most widespread abstraction, programming language, and concept for data plane programming. It is developed and standardized by an open community and it is supported by various software and hardware platforms. In this paper, we survey the literature from 2015 to 2020 on data plane programming with P4. Our survey covers 497 references of which 367 are scientific publications. We organize our work into two parts. In the first part, we give an overview of data plane programming models, the programming language, architectures, compilers, targets, and data plane APIs. We also consider research efforts to advance P4 technology. In the second part, we analyze a large body of literature considering P4-based applied research. We categorize 241 research papers into different application domains, summarize their contributions, and extract prototypes, target platforms, and source code availability.
... In [6] a NetFPGA-based network slicing implementation for 5G MEC computing architecture is presented, however it does not present support for multi-tenancy and therefore, it is not flexible enough to be compared with this contribution and also to be considered as a 6G solution. In [7], a hardwarebased network slicing solution for smart grids self-healing scenarios over 5G networks is described. ...
... Recent research trends are exploring selected hardware offloading solutions. For example, FPGA implementation of offloading the GPRS Tunnelling Protocol (GTP) function in the MEC platforms are proposed in [2], or slicing solution based on programmable switch in [3] and, finally, stateless translations of GTP protocol in Segment Routing version 6 in [4]. Offloading of 5G virtualised Radio Access Network (vRAN) functions to programmable hardware has been also proposed [5]. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This demo shows a 5G X-haul testbed enhanced with P4 switches implementing the offloading of the User Plane Function module. The P4 code includes GTP protocol encapsulation/decapsulation function, fully configurable N3-N6- N9 steering, and advanced online monitoring of the experienced latency metadata.
... Several P4-based UPF implementations have been proposed commercially and in the literature. Most of their software is not open source [133][134][135]. ...
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Fifth generation (5G) cellular networks will serve a wide variety of heterogeneous use cases, including mobile broadband users, ultra-low latency services and massively dense connectivity scenarios. The resulting diverse communication requirements will demand networking with unprecedented flexibility, not currently provided by the monolithic black-box approach of 4G cellular networks. The research community and an increasing number of standardization bodies and industry coalitions have recognized softwarization, virtualization, and disaggregation of networking functionalities as the key enablers of the needed shift to flexibility. Particularly, software-defined cellular networks are heralded as the prime technology to satisfy the new application-driven traffic requirements and to support the highly time-varying topology and interference dynamics, because of their openness through well-defined interfaces, and programmability, for swift and responsive network optimization. Leading the technological innovation in this direction, several 5G software-based projects and alliances have embraced the open source approach, making new libraries and frameworks available to the wireless community. This race to open source softwarization, however, has led to a deluge of solutions whose interoperability and interactions are often unclear. This article provides the first cohesive and exhaustive compendium of recent open source software and frameworks for 5G cellular networks, with a full stack and end-to-end perspective. We detail their capabilities and functionalities focusing on how their constituting elements fit the 5G ecosystem, and unravel the interactions among the surveyed solutions. Finally, we review hardware and testbeds on which these frameworks can run, and provide a critical perspective on the limitations of the state-of-the-art, as well as feasible directions toward fully open source, programmable 5G networks.
... Several P4-based UPF implementations have been proposed commercially and in the literature. Most of their software is not open source [121][122][123]. ...
Preprint
Fifth generation (5G) cellular networks will serve a wide variety of heterogeneous use cases, including mobile broadband users, ultra-low latency services, and massively dense connectivity scenarios. The resulting diverse communication requirements will demand networking with unprecedented flexibility, not currently provided by the monolithic and black-box approach of 4G cellular networks. The research community and an increasing number of standardization bodies and industry coalitions have recognized softwarization, virtualization, and disaggregation of networking functionalities as the key enablers of the needed shift to flexibility. Particularly, software-defined cellular networks are heralded as the prime technology to satisfy the new application-driven traffic requirements and to support the highly time-varying topology and interference dynamics, because of their openness through well-defined interfaces, and programmability, for swift and responsive network optimization. Leading the technological innovation in this direction, several 5G software-based projects and alliances have embraced the open source approach, making new libraries and frameworks available to the wireless community. This race to open source softwarization, however, has led to a deluge of solutions whose interoperability and interactions are often unclear. This article provides the first cohesive and exhaustive compendium of recent open source software and frameworks for 5G cellular networks, with a full stack and end-to-end perspective. We detail their capabilities and functionalities focusing on how their constituting elements fit the 5G ecosystem, and unravel the interactions among the surveyed solutions. Finally, we review platforms on which these frameworks can run, and discuss the limitations of the state-of-the-art, and feasible directions towards fully open source, programmable 5G networks.
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The evolution from the current Fourth-Generation (4G) networks to the emerging Fifth-Generation (5G) technologies implies significant changes in the architecture and poses demanding requirements on network infrastructures. One of the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) in 5G is to ensure a secure network with zero downtime. In this paper, we focus on the provisioning of protection capabilities for 5G infrastructures. Our objective is to implement a new 5G firewall that allows the detection, differentiation and selective blocking of 5G network traffic in the edge-to-core network segment of a 5G infrastructure, using a hardware-accelerated framework based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), developed using the P4 language. The proposed 5G firewall has been prototyped with the new capabilities proposed empirically validated.