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Seeking common ground in contested energy technology landscapes

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Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to identify distinct discourses on energy development in the south-western region of Alberta and to identify areas of overlapping interest (common ground) that can serve as a focal point and a foothold for progress on participatory governance within this energy landscape.

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Sumario: The new environmental conflict -- Discourse analysis -- The historical roots of ecological modernization -- Accumulating knowledge, accumulating pollution?. Ecological modernization in the United Kingdom -- The micro-powers of apocalypse: ecological modernization in the Netherlands -- Ecological modernization: discourse and institutional change Bibliografía: P. 297-318
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