Chapter

Autonomous Swarm of Heterogeneous Robots for Surveillance Operations

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Abstract

The introduction of Unmanned vehicles (UxVs) in the recent years has created a new security field that can use them as both a potential threat as well as new technological weapons against those threats. Dealing with these issues from the counter-threat perspective, the proposed architecture project focuses on designing and developing a complete system which utilizes the capabilities of multiple UxVs for surveillance objectives in different operational environments. Utilizing a combination of diverse UxVs equipped with various sensors, the developed architecture involves the detection and the characterization of threats based on both visual and thermal data. The identification of objects is enriched with additional information extracted from other sensors such as radars and RF sensors to secure the efficiency of the overall system. The current prototype displays diverse interoperability concerning the multiple visual sources that feed the system with the required optical data. Novel detection models identify the necessary threats while this information is enriched with higher-level semantic representations. Finally, the operator is informed properly according to the visual identification modules and the outcomes of the UxVs operations. The system can provide optimal surveillance capacities to the relevant authorities towards an increased situational awareness.

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